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Friday, May 26
 

3:00pm

Totebag Stuffing
Limited Capacity seats available

Friday May 26, 2017 3:00pm - 6:00pm
TBA
 
Saturday, May 27
 

5:00pm

Taste of the World Fair: Food and Architecture Walk with Tastings
Limited Capacity full

Arriving early to the conference? Join us for this Saturday evening walking and tasting tour.
While the date of the World's Fair dictates much of the tour's content, you won't visit the site of the fair. Instead, we focus on the downtown area to show you what visitors to the World's fair would have seen when they explored this part of the city after spending a day at the event. 

In 1893, not only were new buildings being developed to coincide with the Exposition, but many different types of food were being dreamed up as well. From meals to desserts, people from all over the country got to try the tasty, and now iconic, Chicago treats. The classic Chicago hot dog, Cracker Jacks and Wrigley Spearmint gum; these were all introduced to fairgoers for the first time. Take a culinary journey back through time as you gear up for the AIC Annual meeting. Cost $29


 
Sunday, May 28
 

8:00am

(Collection Care) Reading Between the Lines: Understanding Construction and Exhibit Design Drawings
Limited Capacity seats available

Preservation professionals, be they conservators, collection managers, registrars, or others, have an initial opportunity to shape the preservation of collections by contributing to planning of construction and renovation projects. Being able to understand architectural drawings and the preservation outcomes that the built environment will achieve is central to making good decisions for collection preservation.

This two-day workshop will bring together architects and engineers experienced in working with conservators to teach skills involved with understanding architectural, mechanical, electrical, and exhibition design drawings. Without formalized training in reading drawings, conservators and allied collection professionals may be missing crucial details that will affect their work and preservation of their collections. This course will enable the preservation professional to be better advocates for the collections and the staff that work with them in producing sustainable and effective preservation spaces. It will improve preservation professionals' abilities as project team members, providing benefits for institution and collection preservation alike.

 Cost: $279

Speaker(s)
avatar for Jeffrey Hirsch

Jeffrey Hirsch

Principal, EwingCole
Jeffrey Hirsch, AIA, LEED AP With over 25 years of experience as an architect, Jeff Hirsch serves as the Director of EwingCole’s Cultural practice. He oversees the design and development of all work and leads the planning of projects that involve large numbers of stakeholders and... Read More →
avatar for William Jarema

William Jarema

Architect/Engineer, EwingCole
Mr. Jarema is a principal at EwingCole, in charge of managing the HVAC engineering and design staff for their Cultural, Higher Education and Government Practices. He has been the lead HVAC engineer for a variety of projects at Smithsonian's NMNH, NMAH, Museum Support Center, CHNDM... Read More →
avatar for Mike Lawrence

Mike Lawrence

Chief of Design, Office of Exhibits, National Museum of Natural History
As Chief of Design for the Office of Exhibits, Mike Lawrence is responsible for the design quality of all permanent and temporary exhibits, graphics and signage within the Museum. He provides oversight and guidance to contract design firms on major exhibits such as the Sant Ocean... Read More →
avatar for Angela Matchica

Angela Matchica

Principal, Engineer, EwingCole
Angela Matchica, PE, LC, LEED AP Angela is a lighting designer and electrical engineer who incorporates her knowledge of emerging lighting technologies and integrated system design with her creativity and unique expression for a cohesive lighting display. She has applied these visions... Read More →

Sponsors
avatar for Collection Care Network

Collection Care Network

AIC's Collection Care Network (CCN) was created in recognition of “the critical importance of preventive conservation as the most effective means of promoting the long-term preservation of cultural property” (from Guidelines for Practice of the American Institute for Conservation... Read More →



Sunday May 28, 2017 8:00am - Monday May 29, 2017 5:00pm
Picasso Concourse Level, West Tower

8:30am

Approaches to the Conservation of Contemporary Murals
Limited Capacity filling up

This unique two-day workshop will focus on visits to outdoor community murals in Chicago from the past half-century, in various states of preservation. A key component will be presentations and discussions by artists, community members, and conservators regarding various approaches to conservation, treatment, repainting, or renewal of these public murals. Destinations will include visits to oil-based, acrylic-based, spray-painted and mosaic and bricolage murals on a variety of exterior walls. Considerations of the lifespan of various mural materials will be central to the on-site observations of the murals. Discussions will include such topics as the history of community murals in Chicago, significance of community murals today, rights, roles and responsibilities of artists, arts organizations, conservators, and community; philosophical questions of value and community choice, materials, methods and approaches for conservation, restoration and renewal, and maintenance of community murals. The latest research on protective and anti-graffiti coatings will also be presented.

Cost: $279 

Speaker(s)
avatar for Will Shank, [Fellow]

Will Shank, [Fellow]

Independent Conservator and Curator, Rescue Public Murals
Trained at the Villa Schifanoia in Florence, the Institute of Fine Arts of NYU, and the Harvard University Museums, Will Shank is former head of conservation at SFMOMA. Based in Barcelona, he specializes in the care of contemporary painting collections and murals. A Fellow of AIC... Read More →
avatar for Leslie Rainer, [PA]

Leslie Rainer, [PA]

Wall Paintings Conservator, Senior Project Specialist, Getty Conservation Institute
Leslie Rainer is a wall paintings conservator and senior project specialist at the Getty Conservation Institute. She has been involved in the conservation of wall paintings on projects in the US, France, Italy, West Africa, China, Mexico, Guatemala and Peru. She is currently project... Read More →
avatar for Rahmaan Barnes

Rahmaan Barnes

Street Artist and Muralist
Growing up on the South Side of Chicago, surrounded by urban art and public murals, I became inspired to be involved with the subculture of urban graffiti. A consequent arrest for “vandalism” put me on a mission to legitimize the production of aerosol murals. This became the main... Read More →
AF

Astrid Fuller

Artist of historic murals
avatar for Olivia Gude

Olivia Gude

School of the Art Institute of Chicago, Muralist and Professor
Angela Paterakis Professor of Art Education (2015). BA, Webster College, St. Louis. MFA, University of Chicago. Publications: Art Education; Journal of Korean Society for Education through Art; Studies in Art Education; Teaching Tolerance Magazine; Chapters in Art, Culture, and... Read More →
avatar for Jeff Huebner

Jeff Huebner

Journalist
I'm an arts journalist and freelance writer who's a regular contributor to the Chicago Reader. My articles and occasional reviews have also appeared in ARTnews, Public Art Review, Sculpture, New Art Examiner, Ceramics Monthly, Labor's Heritage, and Chicago magazine and the Chicago... Read More →
avatar for Nancy Plax

Nancy Plax

Community Organizer
avatar for Jon Pounds

Jon Pounds

Executive Director Emeritus, Chicago Public Art Group
Jon Pounds was formerly the Executive Director of the Chicago Public Art Group. Pounds, whose early public work involved creating temporary street installations, joined Chicago Public Art Group in 1983 and began creating collaborative public artworks. Through building playground structures... Read More →
avatar for Steve Weaver

Steve Weaver

Executive Director, Chicago Public Art Group
Steve Weaver is the Executive Director of Chicago Public Art Group (CPAG), a 45-year-old non-profit organization whose mission is to unite artist and communities in partnership to produce quality public art. Steve collaborates with schools, parks, libraries, community-based organizations... Read More →
avatar for John Pitman Weber

John Pitman Weber

Artist
Best known as a public artist, John Pitman Weber has also been active in the studio for over thirty years. Mr. Weber has created public works in England, France, New York City, Los Angeles, Minneapolis, and Chicago as well as for small cities in Georgia and Iowa. In over 40 major... Read More →
avatar for Bernard Williams

Bernard Williams

Artist and restorer
Bernard Williams is a native of Chicago, Illinois. He holds a BFA degree from the University of Illinois at Champaign-Urbana and a Master of Fine Arts degree from Northwestern University in Evanston. He also studied at the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture, Maine, 1987. Williams... Read More →
avatar for Caryl Yasko

Caryl Yasko

Muralist
Caryl Yasko graduated from Dominican College with a bachelor's degree in art in 1963.  She sold her first painting, The Blue Pail, to help pay for the birth of her first child.  When her husband was awarded a Fullbright scholarship in 1968, the couple moved to Japan with their... Read More →

Sponsors
avatar for Golden Artist Colors

Golden Artist Colors

Golden Artist Colors is a manufacturing company that focuses almost entirely on paints used in fine art, decoration, and crafts. Based in New Berlin, New York, the company produces the largest line of acrylic colors that is currently available to artists, including recreations of... Read More →
avatar for ICOM-CC Murals

ICOM-CC Murals

The Murals, Stone, and Rock Art Working Group aims to promote conservation of wall paintings, stone, rock art, and mosaics and to consider their survival in their original locations. The materials covered by this group have common physical attributes of being both porous and brittle... Read More →
avatar for National Endowment for the Humanities

National Endowment for the Humanities

The National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) is an independent federal agency created in 1965. It is one of the largest funders of humanities programs in the United States. Because democracy demands wisdom, NEH serves and strengthens our republic by promoting excellence in the... Read More →
avatar for Nova Color Artists' Acrylic Paint

Nova Color Artists' Acrylic Paint

Nova Color Artists' Acrylic Paint is a top quality artists’ acrylic paint suitable for use on canvas, paper, fabric, wood, plaster, masonry, and most non-slick, non-oily surfaces. Nova Color Artists' Acrylics are as a fine art paint and mural paint as well as for fabric painting... Read More →
avatar for Voices in Contemporary Art

Voices in Contemporary Art

Voices in Contemporary Art (VoCA) is a non-profit organization that generates critical dialogue and interdisciplinary programming to address the production, presentation, and preservation of contemporary art. Though based in New York City, VoCA is a mobile organization, partnering... Read More →



Sunday May 28, 2017 8:30am - Monday May 29, 2017 5:00pm
Tour Departure Area - Crystal Foyer At the Hyatt Regency WEST TOWER

10:00am

Tools and Techniques for UV/Visible Fluorescence Documentation
Limited Capacity filling up

This workshop will provide an opportunity for conservators to learn more about the tools and techniques needed to create high quality UV/visible fluorescence images that can be meaningfully analyzed, compared and viewed. UV/visible fluorescence is a powerful, non-destructive, imaging technique that can be used as a diagnostic tool and to inform conservation treatment. However, this technique's usefulness for these applications is compromised by inconsistencies in approach and expectations. Through lecture and demonstration, participants will learn about practical tools such as filters, UVA lamps, UV safety equipment, standardization targets, reflectance targets, and post-processing techniques. Scientific data will be used to illustrate the positive and negative aspects of materials, giving participants the knowledge to evaluate new tools and equipment. When possible, low-cost and practical options will be presented.

Cost: $169

Speaker(s)
avatar for Jennifer McGlinchey Sexton, [PA]

Jennifer McGlinchey Sexton, [PA]

Conservator, McGlinchey Sexton Conservation, LLC
Jennifer McGlinchey Sexton is an independent Conservator of Photographs and works on paper in Colorado Springs, CO. Jennifer holds a BFA in Photography from Massachusetts College of Art and Design. In 2010, she earned an MA in Art Conservation from Buffalo State College with a concentration... Read More →


Sunday May 28, 2017 10:00am - 5:00pm
Comiskey Concourse Level, West Tower

10:30am

Out Damn Spot: An Exploration of Chelating Agents and Alternative Methodologies for Removing or Reducing Staining in Paper
Limited Capacity full

Due to the complex origins of paper discoloration and staining, conservators need numerous materials and procedures to address disfiguring elements on artwork. Metals in paper, such as contaminants, brought in environmentally, or intentionally included in the paper pulp, are problematic from a preservation point of view, and can initiate many disfiguring stains.

This workshop looks beyond the treatments (light bleaching, hydrogen peroxide, and sodium borohydride) often used to address cellulose degradation resulting in visible staining, and focuses on the use of ammonium citrates and DPTA (diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid) to reduce discoloration caused by pollution, grime, or paper additives and accidental inclusions.  With lectures that cover chelating agents and buffers combined with a day and half of hands-on treatment exercises, participants will explore methods to reduce discoloration in paper in the form of foxing, mat burn, and other types of staining.   Participants will leave the workshop with an understanding of the theories and practices for incorporating chelating agents into treatments as well as practical experience in using chelating agents for common paper conservation problems.

The workshop organizers encourage participation from paper conservators who have little knowledge of chelating agents, but who do have significant experience in the treatment of paper.

Cost: $349

Speaker(s)
avatar for Antoinette Dwan, [Fellow]

Antoinette Dwan, [Fellow]

Paper Conservator, Art Conservation Services
M.S. Art Conservation U. of Delaware M.A. Art History UC Davis BA English & Art UC Berkeley. Head of paper conservation: Smithsonian Institution MAH. Head of Conservation Baltimore Museum of Art. Mellon Fellow in paper conservation National Gallery of Art. AIC Fellow 15 years. ww... Read More →
avatar for Chris Stavroudis-[PA]

Chris Stavroudis-[PA]

Paintings Conservator, Chris Stavroudis, Paintings Conservator
Chris Stavroudis is a paintings conservator in private practice based in West Hollywood, California. He is a graduate of the Winterthur/University of Delaware Program. He is the creator of the Modular Cleaning Program and has taught over 40 workshops on using the MCP. He is a co-instructor... Read More →



Sunday May 28, 2017 10:30am - Monday May 29, 2017 5:00pm
Art Institute of Chicago 111 S Michigan Ave, Chicago, IL 60603

12:30pm

Afternoon at the University of Chicago with Reception at the Smart Art Museum with Robie House
Limited Capacity filling up

The University of Chicago is home to several world class museums that are on the forefront of conservation. In this "open House” style tour you will have the opportunity to visit 2 or 3 institutions and tour the conservation labs, storage, and collections.The Oriental Institute is a world-class research institute at the University of Chicago specializing in the archaeology, history and art of the ancient Middle East. The museum, which opened its doors in 1931, contains a renowned collection of antiquities from ancient Egypt, Nubia, Persia, Mesopotamia, Syria, Anatolia and the ancient site of Megiddo. Take this rare opportunity to go behind the scenes, visit the Conservation Laboratory and learn about past and ongoing preservation projects. Be sure to make time on your visit to view the galleries which showcase spectacular finds, the majority of which were excavated during Oriental Institute expeditions to the Middle East in the early 20th century. In addition to the collections, architecture enthusiasts will enjoy the building's exquisite Art Deco details including the symbolic imagery of the tympanum over the building entrance and the superbly decorated museum ceiling. The Joe and Rika Mansueto Library, in the heart of the University of Chicago campus, features a soaring elliptical glass dome capping a 180-seat Grand Reading Room, state-of-the-art conservation and digitization laboratories, and an underground high-density automated storage and retrieval system for 3.5 million volumes. The Mansueto Library, opened in 2011, speeds scholarly productivity by allowing for the retrieval of materials within an average time of 3 minutes through use of robotic cranes. The University of Chicago Library, committed to providing support for research, teaching, and learning, consists of six libraries containing renowned world class collections. Robie House – Frank Lloyd Wright's masterpiece located on the grounds of the University of Chicago isan icon of modern architecture. Trained interpreters offer insights into amazing contemporary spaces designed by Wright over a hundred years ago. Our tour will include the: children's playroom, entry hall, living room, dining room, guest room, master bedroom, butler's pantry and kitchen. The University of Chicago tour will end with a reception at the University's Smart Museum of Art. The Smart collects Asian art, European art, contemporary art, and modern art & design, and is well known for collecting clusters of works that introduce important, though lesser known areas of art history. In addition to the permanent galleries, on exhibit during the visit will be Classicisms, which will trace the shifting parameters of classicism from antiquity to the early 20th century. Additionally, Vostell Concrete, 1969-1973 will explore the ways in which leading Fluxus artist Wolf Vostell used concrete as an actual material and artistic motif. This exhibition was inspired by the re-discovery, conservation, and 2016 reinstallation of the University's Vostell sculpture Concrete Traffic, located just inside a parking garage near the museum. Cost - $69 without Robie House and $80 with Robie House


Sponsors
avatar for UChicago Arts

UChicago Arts

The arts are central to the mission of the University of Chicago. With a strong tradition of cross-disciplinary practices, intricately mixed with intellectual curiosity and creative energy, the University fosters a bustling arts community on Chicago’s South Side. In response to... Read More →



12:30pm

Afternoon at the University of Chicago with Reception at the Smart Art Museum without Robie House
Limited Capacity seats available

The University of Chicago is home to several world class museums that are on the forefront of conservation. In this "open House” style tour you will have the opportunity to visit 2 or 3 institutions and tour the conservation labs, storage, and collections.The Oriental Institute is a world-class research institute at the University of Chicago specializing in the archaeology, history and art of the ancient Middle East. The museum, which opened its doors in 1931, contains a renowned collection of antiquities from ancient Egypt, Nubia, Persia, Mesopotamia, Syria, Anatolia and the ancient site of Megiddo. Take this rare opportunity to go behind the scenes, visit the Conservation Laboratory and learn about past and ongoing preservation projects. Be sure to make time on your visit to view the galleries which showcase spectacular finds, the majority of which were excavated during Oriental Institute expeditions to the Middle East in the early 20th century. In addition to the collections, architecture enthusiasts will enjoy the building's exquisite Art Deco details including the symbolic imagery of the tympanum over the building entrance and the superbly decorated museum ceiling. The Joe and Rika Mansueto Library, in the heart of the University of Chicago campus, features a soaring elliptical glass dome capping a 180-seat Grand Reading Room, state-of-the-art conservation and digitization laboratories, and an underground high-density automated storage and retrieval system for 3.5 million volumes. The Mansueto Library, opened in 2011, speeds scholarly productivity by allowing for the retrieval of materials within an average time of 3 minutes through use of robotic cranes. The University of Chicago Library, committed to providing support for research, teaching, and learning, consists of six libraries containing renowned world class collections. Robie House – Frank Lloyd Wright's masterpiece located on the grounds of the University of Chicago isan icon of modern architecture. Trained interpreters offer insights into amazing contemporary spaces designed by Wright over a hundred years ago. Our tour will include the: children's playroom, entry hall, living room, dining room, guest room, master bedroom, butler's pantry and kitchen. The University of Chicago tour will end with a reception at the University's Smart Museum of Art. The Smart collects Asian art, European art, contemporary art, and modern art & design, and is well known for collecting clusters of works that introduce important, though lesser known areas of art history. In addition to the permanent galleries, on exhibit during the visit will be Classicisms, which will trace the shifting parameters of classicism from antiquity to the early 20th century. Additionally, Vostell Concrete, 1969-1973 will explore the ways in which leading Fluxus artist Wolf Vostell used concrete as an actual material and artistic motif. This exhibition was inspired by the re-discovery, conservation, and 2016 reinstallation of the University's Vostell sculpture Concrete Traffic, located just inside a parking garage near the museum. Cost - $69 without Robie House and $80 with Robie House



2:15pm

Devil in the White City
Limited Capacity seats available

Inspired by Erik Larson's best-selling book, go back to 1893 to follow the trails of Daniel Burnham and the devilish doings of H. H. Holmes. Visit the historic fairgrounds, the Garden of the Phoenix in Jackson Park, and discover what has become an iconic Chicago story and how the World's Fair shaped the city. For fans of the book, this tour is a must. However, it is also an excellent introduction to Chicago and if you have not yet read the book there is still time before the Annual Meeting. This tour combines bus riding and walking.

Cost - $59


4:00pm

A Gilded Afternoon: A visit to the Richard H. Driehaus Museum with Wine Reception
Limited Capacity seats available

Immerse yourself in the Gilded age as we take a private tour of the Driehuas mansion. The Richard H. Driehaus Museum immerses visitors in one of the grandest residential buildings of 19th-century Chicago, the Gilded Age home of banker Samuel Mayo Nickerson. Philanthropist Richard H. Driehaus founded the museum on April 1, 2003 with a vision to influence today's built environment by preserving and promoting architecture and design of the past. To realize his vision, Mr. Driehaus commissioned a five-year restoration effort to preserve the structure and its magnificent interiors. Today the galleries feature surviving furnishings paired with elegant, historically-appropriate pieces from the Driehaus Collection of Fine and Decorative Arts, including important works by such celebrated designers as Herter Brothers and Louis Comfort Tiffany. Today, the Museum is a premier example of historic preservation, offering visitors an opportunity to experience through its architecture, interiors, collection, and exhibitions how the prevailing design philosophies of the period were interpreted by artists, architects, and designers at the waning of the 19th-century and the dawn of the 20th-century. Guests at the mansion would never have been turned away without being offered food and drink and neither will we. Enjoy a light wine reception at the end of our tour. The Museum is located on the Magnificent mile, perfect to grab a bit of dinner and/or some shopping at the end of the tour. Cost - $59


4:00pm

Chicago Bridge Walk (Sunday)
Limited Capacity seats available

View the new Riverwalk and cities iconic bridges on this two-hour walking tour. Learn how the new Chicago Bridge became a linear park that makes Chicago a magnet for outdoor recreation. Understand how the Riverwalk was built—and why. Walk over, around and under Chicago famed bridges with Patrick McBriarty, author of Chicago River Bridges, winner of the 2015 Ferguson Prize. Mc Briarty will present the untold history and development of Chicago's iconic bridges from the first wood footbridge, built by a tavern owner in 1832, to the fantastic engineering and architectural marvels spanning the Chicago River today. See the story of Chicago as seen through some of its bridges. This tour will involve walking over bridges. Cost $25


4:00pm

River North Walking Tour and Pub Crawl
Limited Capacity seats available

Looking for a great way to meet some of your fellow attendees before the start of the conference? Join us on the River North Walking Tour and Pub Crawl. Admire River North's architecture and explore some of the neighborhood's favorite watering holes while you learn about Chicago's role as the center of the brewing industry, the 1850s "beer wars” and more. We'll visit an Irish pub, an English bar and an adaptively reused warehouse, where you'll enjoy the skyline from the rooftop tap. The tour will start at the Hyatt Regency and end at the last pub. Attendees can walk or take an uber or taxi back to the Hyatt. The cost of drinks is not included in the tour price, however there will be opportunities to purchase drinks at the pub stops. Tour open to those 21 and older. Cost - $25

 
Monday, May 29
 

8:30am

Building Emergency Response Skills
Limited Capacity filling up

The unpredictable impact of disasters on cultural heritage property and the community will challenge collection managers and conservators with even the best emergency response training. Salvage of collections requires quick thought and measured action under difficult circumstances, making our usual handling and treatment methods impractical. Conservators and allied professionals can, nevertheless, use their knowledge of materials and conservation strategies to make sound salvage decisions – if they remain calm, focused, and are prepared for the inevitable time and resource constraints of a disaster situation.

This workshop is designed to develop and hone salvage decision-making skills for conservators and allied professionals, with any level of prior emergency response training. The presentation by the three very experienced responders will lay a foundation for understanding the arc of immediate response to long-term recovery. Using provided tools and information sources, workshop participants will increase their ability to make resourceful, creative, and confident on-the-spot salvage decisions.

Cost: $89 

Speaker(s)
avatar for Susan Duhl, [PA]

Susan Duhl, [PA]

Conservator/Collections Consultant, Conservator/Collections Consultant/AIC CERT Working Group/AIC Emergency Committee
Susan is a Foundation of the American Institute for Conservation National Heritage Responder (FAIC -NHR) and on the Boards of FAIC Emergency Committee and FAIC-NHR Working Group.  Susan teaches Disaster Protection and Recovery worldwide, including Nepal and Greece. She responded... Read More →
avatar for Robert Herskovitz, [PA]

Robert Herskovitz, [PA]

Outreach Conservator, Minnesota Historical Society
Bob Herskovitz has been an objects conservator since 1975, first with the Arizona Historical Society and, since 1987, with the Minnesota Historical Society. He is responsible for the development and implementation of the Minnesota Historical Society Conservation Outreach Program... Read More →
avatar for Ann Frellsen

Ann Frellsen

Collections Conservator, Emory University Libraries
Ann Frellsen has just retired after nearly 27 years as the Book and Paper Collections Conservator for the Emory University Libraries. Her other specialties are training, disaster planning and response, and bookbinding.

Sponsors
avatar for Emergency Committee

Emergency Committee

The charge of the committee to promote awareness and increase knowledge of the AIC membership in the areas of emergency preparedness, response and recovery for cultural heritage by: contributing to the production of articles (published or web-based), brochures and handouts which provide... Read More →
avatar for National Heritage Responders

National Heritage Responders

The National Heritage Responders (NHR) - formerly the American Institute for Conservation - Collections Emergency Response Team (AIC-CERT) - responds to the needs of cultural institutions during emergencies and disasters through coordinated efforts with first responders, state agencies... Read More →



Monday May 29, 2017 8:30am - 12:30pm
Acapulco Ballroom Level, West Tower

8:30am

Essential Frank Lloyd Wright: Home and Studio, Oak Brook and Bach House
Limited Capacity filling up

A must while in Chicago, join us for this full day tour. We will head out to Oak Park in the morning with our first stop for a tour of Frank Lloyd Wright's home and studio. Frank Lloyd Wright used his first home to experiment with design concepts that contain the seeds of his architectural philosophy. In his adjacent studio, Wright and his associates developed a new American architecture - the Prairie style. We will then exporle Oak Park on foot. Oak Park is home to the world's largest collection of Wright-designed buildings. Discover the development of Wright's style between 1889 and 1909, and trace the evolution of American residential architecture as trained interpreters guide you through the Frank Lloyd Wright Historic District surrounding the Home and Studio. You will then enjoy a tasty box lunch aboard our motorcoach as we taken in the architectural delights of more far-flug sites Oak Park and River Forest from the comfort of your motorcoach. Our expert guide joins your coach group at the Home and Studio to offer a tour of historic Oak Park and River Forest, featuring structures designed by Frank Lloyd Wright and his contemporaries. Afterwards we say good by to Oak Park and visit Bach House on our way back to Chicago. This richly conceived yet intimately scaled residence was built in 1915 for Emil Bach, president of Chicago's Bach Brick Co. A modification of Wright's design for "A Fireproof House for $5000,” published in Ladies Home Journal in 1907, the Bach House was executed between Wright's return from Europe in 1911 and his departure to Japan in 1916 to oversee construction of the Imperial Hotel. In contrast to the expansive, open Prairie houses Wright designed prior to his European sojourn, the Bach House is strongly centered and self-contained. While adopting the vocabulary of Wright's Prairie house, the Bach House looks toward future stylistic directions in Wright's work, in its contained geometry, efficient scale, and distinctive window designs. This full day tour includes lunch and efficiently covers the essential Frank Lloyd Wright sites. Cost =$95

9:00am

Art of Breakfast at the Union League Club
Limited Capacity seats available

Start your Memorial Day off right by joining your colleagues for an early morning tour of the Union League Club's art collection. Collecting art has been a tradition at the Union League Club since 1886. Today, the art collection is a vital part of the Club's identity and a significant part of Chicago's art history. The art collection is one of the oldest and most important private collections of American art in the Midwest, and it has one of the best collections of Illinois art.The majority of the art collection is on view throughout the Club. There are nearly 800 works in the Club's collection which represent more than 150 years of art making in America. The collection features a range of art movements, styles, and subjects, from traditional to contemporary art, and it includes paintings, sculptures, drawings, watercolors, prints, photographs, and decorative arts. Learn about some of the conservation challenges for caring for a collection outside of a museum environment. Enjoy a delicious breakfast. Cost $35


9:00am

Preservation on a Budget
Limited Capacity filling up

Panelists from Europe, United States, Latin America and the Caribbean will share experiences in carrying out preservation projects in various fields with limited resources and to share their challenges and lessons learned with emphasis on Latin America and the Caribbean regions. U.S. conservators who have worked in Latin America and the Caribbean, as well as conservators from the region, who have worked successfully in challenging projects, will share their experiences and foster discussions to explore techniques for achieving positive results for preservation projects with limited budget, limited human resources, limited training, or other limitations. The discussion groups will address specific short- and long-term tips for carrying out preservation on a budget. In addition, the discussion session will provide an opportunity for expanding networking, communications, and interactions.

Cost: $169

Sponsors
avatar for APOYOnline

APOYOnline

In 1989, a group of Latin American and North American conservation professionals met to discuss and identify needs of colleagues in Latin America, and to propose ways of supporting their professional activities. This network has continued to grow and currently it includes over 4,500... Read More →
avatar for Getty Foundation

Getty Foundation

The Getty Foundation (initially called the Getty Grant Program) was established in 1984 in the belief that philanthropy is a key ingredient in carrying out the mission of the J. Paul Getty Trust. The Getty Trust is an international cultural organization that includes the Getty Conservation Institute, Getty Foundation, Getty Research Institute, and J. Paul Getty Museum. Drawing on our unique position as a grant-making entity within the larger Getty Trust, we utilize the expertise... Read More →



Monday May 29, 2017 9:00am - 3:00pm
Comiskey Concourse Level, West Tower

9:00am

(Electronic Media) Examining the Composition and Structure of Digital Collection Objects: Strategies and Guidance for Ongoing Management and Preservation
Limited Capacity filling up

Caring for digital collections is a complex responsibility. Digital preservation is a not a single activity, but a knowledge framework and a suite of activities that stewards carry out on digital collection objects throughout the duration of their care within the custody of a collecting organization. This workshop illustrates the fundamental nature and elements of digital objects, from bits to bytes to formal format structures to file systems to operating systems to interpreting software. This ecosystem of related objects is what in fact constitutes the digital object as a conceptual or information object.

Instructors will demonstrate methods for understanding and interpreting these many technological layers, including how to translate bytes into understandable information based on file format specifications, and how to distinguish file object information from file system information in order to understand the true boundaries of a digital object within a given computer system. Instructors will also demonstrate methodologies for digital object management according to a set of common digital preservation activities, including appraisal, acquisition, characterization, metadata management, fixity management, packaging, storage, and monitoring. Participants will engage in hands-on activities and are encouraged to bring a personal computer.

Cost: $169 

Speaker(s)
avatar for Bertram Lyons

Bertram Lyons

Senior Consultant, AVP
Bertram Lyons provides digital preservation consulting and training for the Society of American Archivists, the International Association of Sound and Audiovisual Archives, the Conservation Center for Art and Historic Artifacts, the FBI, the Library of Congress, the Smithsonian Institution... Read More →
avatar for Porter Olsen

Porter Olsen

Ph.D. candidate, University of Maryland
Porter Olsen is a Ph.D. candidate at the University of Maryland studying born-digital and hybrid literary collections under the direction of Matthew Kirschenbaum. Porter was a member of the original BitCurator team serving first as a graduate assistant and then as the BitCurator community... Read More →

Sponsors
avatar for Electronic Media Group

Electronic Media Group

The purpose of the Electronic Media Group is twofold: (1) to preserve electronic art, electronic-based cultural materials, and tools of their creation; and (2) to provide a means for conservators and related professionals to develop and maintain knowledge of relevant new media and... Read More →



Monday May 29, 2017 9:00am - 4:30pm
Toronto Ballroom Level, West Tower

9:00am

Illumination of Collections: Optimization of the Visual Experience
Limited Capacity seats available

This workshop will analyze key factors that influence the visual experience of objects on exhibition. The focus will be on how to balance the need for a high-quality visual experience while limiting light-induced damage. Pertinent theoretical and practical issues will be explained through lectures, group discussions and demonstrations. A discussion of essential cognitive principles of vision will provide a theoretical frame-work for understanding the "visual experience.” The workshop will explore how to implement these fundamental principles in a museum setting utilizing recent advances in lighting technology, including LEDs, new lighting control options, the use of daylight, and the merging of new and legacy lighting systems. Although the focus will be on the fine arts, the workshop will consider the unique concerns specific to historical and natural history collections.

This workshop will provide participants with the knowledge to make better decisions about implementing practical lighting solutions at their institutions, enhancing the visual experience while minimizing light-induced damage. This course is intended for museum professionals who are involved in decision making about illumination of collections.

Cost: $169

Speaker(s)
avatar for Gordon Anson

Gordon Anson

Deputy Chief of Design, Head of Exhibitions Production, and Chief Lighting Designer, National Gallery of Art
Gordon O. Anson, IES, IALD, is a designer that specializes in the in the areas of lighting design, museum exhibits, design and planning.  Since 1977, Gordon Anson has worked in the Design Department at the National Gallery of Art where he has been directly involved more than of... Read More →
avatar for Steven Weintraub

Steven Weintraub

Consultant, Art Preservation Services
Steven Weintraub founded Art Preservation Services in 1988. Steven holds an MA in Art History and an Advanced Certificate in Conservation from the Institute of Fine Arts, NYU. From 1975 to 1986, he was an objects conservator at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Among his many activities... Read More →

Sponsors
avatar for Lighting Services Inc

Lighting Services Inc

Lighting Services Inc
Lighting Services Inc (LSI) is the premier manufacturer of track, accent, display and LED lighting systems. Since 1958, LSI has been dedicated to designing, engineering and manufacturing lighting fixtures of the highest quality. Our reputation for creativity and innovative design... Read More →
avatar for National Endowment for the Humanities

National Endowment for the Humanities

The National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) is an independent federal agency created in 1965. It is one of the largest funders of humanities programs in the United States. Because democracy demands wisdom, NEH serves and strengthens our republic by promoting excellence in the... Read More →



Monday May 29, 2017 9:00am - 5:00pm
Water Tower Concourse Level, West Tower

9:30am

Effectively Using Portable IR and Raman Instruments for Art Object Analysis
Limited Capacity full

It is often necessary or desirable to conduct an infrared or Raman analysis of art objects that is non-destructive and can be accomplished in the field or in a gallery. Infrared and Raman spectroscopy have long been established as effective non-destructive tools for the analysis of art objects. Only recently have portable infrared and Raman devices come on the market that function reliably with sufficient performance characteristics for the conduct of these measurements. The benefits of using portable infrared and Raman units will be discussed with examples shown of the successful employment of these devices. The pitfalls associated with making such methods will also be discussed. In the hands-on workshop, participants will have the opportunity to run portable infrared and Raman spectrometers on objects provided by the instructors. Participants are invited to bring objects of their own for testing.

Cost: $89

Speaker(s)
avatar for Francesca Casadio

Francesca Casadio

Andrew W. Mellon Senior Conservation Scientist and Co-director NU-ACCESS, The Art Institute of Chicago and Northwestern University
Francesca Casadio joined the Art Institute of Chicago in 2003 to establish and direct a state of the art conservation science laboratory. In January 2018, she will assume the post of Executive Director of Conservation and Science in the same institution. Dr. Casadio has also established... Read More →
avatar for Tom Tague

Tom Tague

Bruker Elemental



Monday May 29, 2017 9:30am - 12:00pm
Michigan 1A-B Concourse Level, East Tower

10:00am

Historic Skyscrapers Walk
Limited Capacity seats available

Discover the many stages of the skyscraper, on this walking tour, you will take a step back in time to the late 1800s, to hear stories behind the city's world-famous early tall buildings and get an illustrated look at how Chicago grew from a city devastated by a great fire to a leader in skyscraper engineering and design. Walking Tour starts at the Hyatt and ends at 224 N. Michigan. This tour pairs well with Chicago Modern Architecture Walking Tour which starts at 224 N. Michigan at 1 pm.
Cost = $25


10:00am

CAP, MAP, and StEPS: Collections Care Opportunities for Small Institutions
Do you work with small or mid-sized museums? Join program managers from the Collections Assessment for Preservation (CAP) program, Museum Assessment Program (MAP), and Standards and Excellence Program (StEPs) for History Organizations to learn how these programs can help with collections care and overall institutional development.

The goal of the session is to help attendees better understand the three programs so that they can advise clients and colleagues. The first hour of the session will consist of presentations on each of the programs, focusing on the differences among them and the benefits of each. In the second half, the speakers will hold casual "office hours," to speak with attendees one-on-one about specific questions or scenarios.

Speaker(s)
avatar for Tiffani Emig

Tiffani Emig

CAP Program Coordinator, American Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works
Tiffani came to FAIC to coordinate the administration of the Collections Assessment for Preservation Program (CAP). Previously, she served as Director of Market Operations for the Boston Public Market during the nonprofit's development and opening year. She has also served as Curator... Read More →
avatar for Chris Reich

Chris Reich

Chief Administrator, Office of Museum Services, Institute of Museum and Library Services
Chris Reich has worked with IMLS since 2006 and currently provides oversight supervision for grants management activities in the Office of Museum Services. He serves as an advisor to the Deputy Director for Museums on a broad range of organizational, managerial and technical issues... Read More →
avatar for Danyelle Rickard

Danyelle Rickard

Museum Assessment Program Officer, American Alliance of Museums
Danyelle Rickard has her B.A. in History from the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC) and her M.A. in Museum Studies from Johns Hopkins. She has worked in museum collections for 13 years at various museums including the Maryland Historical Society, Winterthur, The Jewish... Read More →
avatar for Laura Hortz Stanton

Laura Hortz Stanton

Executive Director, Conservation Center for Art & Historic Artifacts
Laura Hortz Stanton is Executive Director of CCAHA. Laura assumed this role in 2014 after having served seven years as CCAHA’s Director of Preservation Services. In this position, she conducted vulnerability and needs assessments, formulated disaster plans for museums, libraries... Read More →


Monday May 29, 2017 10:00am - 12:00pm
Crystal Ballroom A Lobby Level, West Tower

12:00pm

(CIPP) Business Meeting and Lunch
Attend the CIPP business meeting and hear about the group's plans for next year. CIPP members will be treated to a complimentary lunch. While there is no cost for CIPP members, please purchase a free ticket through the system so we can have an accurate count for the lunch. We want to have enough food for everyone.

Monday May 29, 2017 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Michigan 1C (Concourse Level, East Tower)

12:30pm

Glessner House Museum and Historic Prairie Avenue Walk
Limited Capacity seats available

This exclusive tours explores the significant architecture of Glessner House. Controversial at the time of its completion in 1887, it foreshadowed the development of modern residential architecture, and architect H. H. Richardson had a profound impact on architects to follow, including Louis Sullivan and Frank Lloyd Wright. This special two-hour tour will focus on the architecture from basement to attic. Attendees will see areas not included on public tours as well as objects rarely shown, including Richardson's original sketch. Then discover the fascinating history of Chicago's Prairie Avenue on this two-hour walking tour through the neighborhood led by Bill Tyre, Executive Director and Curator of the Glessner House Museum and author of Chicago's Historic Prairie Avenue. The tour will cover 200 years of history, from the Battle of Fort Dearborn through the recent rebirth of the area as Chicago's hottest residential neighborhood. Visitors will see historic photos of homes that have been lost and walk past the eleven houses that remain in the area. Tours of the John J. ‘Jack' Simmerling Gallery of Prairie Avenue History and the incredible Arts & Crafts sanctuary of Second Presbyterian Church, featuring nine Tiffany windows, will be included.

Cost: $45


1:00pm

Chicago Modern Architecture Walk
Limited Capacity seats available

Iconic modern and contemporary skyscrapers, as well as works by world-renowned artists, are featured on this 90-minute walking tour. Chicago was at the forefront of Modernism, the style that revolutionized our visual world during the mid-20th century, and the city has remained a leading center for innovation in architecture.

This tour pairs well with the Historic Skyscrapers Walking Tour. For those of you also taking the Historic Skyscrapers Walking Tour pleae wait for the group at CAF headquaters.

Cost: $25


1:00pm

Walking With Giants: The Sculptures of Lincoln Park
Limited Capacity seats available

Join Krista August, author of Giants in the Park for a walking tour highlighting Lincoln Park's numerous sculptures. She will discuss the fascinating histories behind several of the park's "giants" including, The Alarm, LaSalle, Lincoln, Grant, and Fountain Girl (originally named Willard Fountain, for Evanston's Frances Willard). She will also discuss the broader history of the park, including "missing" statuary and the park's cemetery years. August has been leading walking and biking tours in Chicago for many years, guiding people through the city for the Chicago Architecture Foundation.

Cost - $25

Speaker(s)
avatar for Krista August

Krista August

Tour Guide, Giants in the Park
Krista August holds mathematics and graduate education degrees from Northwestern and DePaul Universities, respectively. Her fine art study includes coursework at the Palette and Chisel, the Old Town Triangle Association, the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, Richeson School... Read More →



1:00pm

Managing Risk: Conservators who care for collections - are you insured inside and out?
  • This session will explore and discuss insurance needs for conservators who work for institutions who may also have their own private practice either inside or outside of the institution setting.
  • What are the insurance responsibilities and requirements for conservators on staff at museums/corporate collections also taking on private projects using museum space? What is the separation between museum work and client work?
  • What are the implications and pitfalls from an insurance perspective for conservators who also act as consultants? 
  • Disaster/catastrophe events: Museums and other organizations that open their doors to the public and other institutions for protection and damage assessment. How would insurance protect conservators who volunteer their services during a disaster

Speaker(s)
avatar for Sameena Merchant

Sameena Merchant

Assistant Vice President, Huntington T. Block Insurance Agency, Inc.
Sameena provides business insurance service to museums, art galleries and historic properties.  Sameena has 27 years of experience in commercial insurance, including underwriting, reinsurance and brokerage. | | Sameena joined HTB’s Commercial Insurance Department in January 2008... Read More →
avatar for Ever Song

Ever Song

Conservator, Huntington T. Block Insurance Agency, Inc.
avatar for Casey Wigglesworth

Casey Wigglesworth

Supplier/Service Provider, Huntington T. Block Insurance Agency, Inc.


Monday May 29, 2017 1:00pm - 3:00pm
Columbian Concourse Level, West Tower

1:00pm

Advancing Leadership in Conservation – A Workshop and Focus Group
Limited Capacity seats available

This session will address the issue of how to create leadership development opportunities in conservation and solicit feedback regarding the establishment of a Leadership Focus Group for Department Heads in Conservation and Science. The session will consist in a round table with presentations of personal stories of professional leadership development and a leadership workshop led by Paul Ingram, Kravis Professor of Business, Columbia Business School and instructor for the Center for Curatorial Leadership.

The session will also include a general discussion period where AIC members are solicited for what they would like to see in a new network designed to support their roles as managers and leaders in the conservation field. 
All AIC members are welcome. You do not have to be a department head to join this session.

The meeting will take place at the Art Institute of Chicago on Monday, May 29, 2017, from 1:00 pm to 5 pm. See schedule attached below.

 Registration $89

Speaker(s)
avatar for Narayan Khandekar, [Fellow]

Narayan Khandekar, [Fellow]

Director, Straus Center for Conservation and Technical Studies, Harvard Art Museums/Straus Center for Conservation and Technical Studies
Narayan Khandekar leads the Straus Center’s conservation and research activities, as well as those for the Center for the Technical Study of Modern Art. Specializing in the scientific analysis of paintings and painted surfaces, he has published extensively on the subject. His laboratory... Read More →
avatar for Tiarna M. Doherty, [PA]

Tiarna M. Doherty, [PA]

Chief of Conservation, Smithsonian American Art Museum
Tiarna became Chief of Conservation at the Smithsonian American Art Museum in 2011. Previously, Tiarna worked for nine years as a paintings conservator at the J. Paul Getty Museum in Los Angeles. She holds a bachelor’s degree in both chemistry and art history from Tufts University... Read More →
avatar for Francesca Casadio

Francesca Casadio

Andrew W. Mellon Senior Conservation Scientist and Co-director NU-ACCESS, The Art Institute of Chicago and Northwestern University
Francesca Casadio joined the Art Institute of Chicago in 2003 to establish and direct a state of the art conservation science laboratory. In January 2018, she will assume the post of Executive Director of Conservation and Science in the same institution. Dr. Casadio has also established... Read More →
avatar for Nicholas Dorman-[PA]

Nicholas Dorman-[PA]

Chief Conservator, Seattle Art Museum
Nicholas Dorman studied conservation at the University of Northumbria, England, at the Doerner Institut in Munich and on an Andrew W. Mellon Fellowship at The Metropolitan Museum of Art. He worked as a conservator at the Doerner Institut and at the Stichting Kollektief Restauratie... Read More →
avatar for Paul Ingram

Paul Ingram

Kravis Professor of Business, Columbia Business School
Paul Ingram is the Kravis Professor Business at the Columbia Business School, and Faculty Director of the Columbia Senior Executive Program. His PhD is from Cornell University and he was on the faculty of Carnegie Mellon University before coming to Columbia. He has held visiting professorships... Read More →
avatar for Per Knutås-[PA]

Per Knutås-[PA]

Chief Conservator, Cleveland Museum of Art
Per Knutås is the Eric and Jane Nord Chief Conservator at the Cleveland Museum of Art where he oversees a department of 15 conservators and conservation technicians. He graduated from The School of Conservation at the Royal Danish Academy of Art, in Copenhagen, Denmark with a focus... Read More →



Monday May 29, 2017 1:00pm - 5:00pm
Art Institute of Chicago 111 S Michigan Ave, Chicago, IL 60603

1:00pm

CIPP Seminar: Using Innovative Tools to Enhance Your Business

This year's seminar will include presentations and discussions about innovative and useful gadgets, apps, technology, computer programs, websites, etc. that are targeted to how to enhance your private conservation business.  Topics and speakers include:

 

* Magnification Technology by Seth Irwin

 

* Digital photography equipment upgrades by Gordon Lewis

 

* Environmental monitoring by Claudio Heitkamp, Testo Inc.

 

* Alarm systems by Beth Nunan

 

* Mold remediation issues and technology by Elise Rousseau

 

* UV inspection lights/illumination by Gloria Velandia Ludmer

 

* Shipping insurance innovations by Elaine Lockard

 

Discussion will focus on various uses of the new ideas, their uses, and technologies

 

applications. Can you line-item these in a conservation project estimate? Is there a

 

subcontractor/expert to offer this service or expertise as members of your

 

“business team?



Cost is $49 for CIPP members and includes a complimentary respirator fit test (by appointment the following day).

Monday May 29, 2017 1:00pm - 5:00pm
Michigan 1C (Concourse Level, East Tower)

1:30pm

National Heritage Responders Business Meeting
All members of the National Heritage Responders are encouraged to attend this year's annual business meeting. Topics of discussion include future grant activities, training needs, and group sustainability. 

Moderator(s)
avatar for Rebecca Elder

Rebecca Elder

Conservator, Rebecca Elder Cultural Heritage Preservation
Rebecca Elder is an experienced cultural heritage preservation consultant who specializes in finding practical and achievable solutions for challenging situations.In 2014, Rebecca founded Rebecca Elder Cultural Heritage Preservation to provide preservation advice to library, museum... Read More →


Monday May 29, 2017 1:30pm - 3:30pm
Acapulco Ballroom Level, West Tower

2:00pm

Scholarly Writing for Conservation
Does your conservation project need some exposure at the national and international scale? Would you like to get the word out about the conservation work you do, but do not know how to begin to write a paper for a journal? Then this pre-session is for you. This informative session will help you organize and summarize your work in order to meet the strict requirements of a peer-reviewed journal article.

The JAIC editorial board wants to encourage and provide guidance to potential authors wishing to submit articles to our journal. Our goal is to assist in the development of skills needed to write and submit journal manuscripts to improve the dissemination of research, treatments, and enhanced knowledge sharing. Scholarly communication, at both the national and international levels, is a skill that is not often prioritized by conservation programs, while the ability to publish in peer-reviewed journals is an essential part of communicating research and results, which is necessary for professional development.

Within this framework, the pre-session will take participants through the process of planning, preparing, and writing a manuscript for submission to a journal in the conservation field, with a clear emphasis on JAIC. 

The session will consist of short presentations, a roundtable discussion with Q&A, and practical exercises with feedback from speakers. Attendees can bring research ideas and/or basic outlines to share for discussion by the editors.

Planned speakers also include Michele Derrick (former JAIC editor-in-chief), Robin Hanson, and Ellen Pearlstein.

Speaker(s)
avatar for Michele Derrick

Michele Derrick

Scientist/Researcher, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston
Michele R. Derrick is a chemist and conservation scientist with more than twenty years’ experience analyzing and characterizing materials. She worked at the University of Arizona Analytical Center and then for twelve years as a conservation scientist at the Getty Conservation Institute... Read More →
avatar for Robin Hanson-[Fellow]

Robin Hanson-[Fellow]

Associate Conservator of Textiles, Cleveland Museum of Art
Robin Hanson has managed the textile conservation lab at the Cleveland Museum of Art for the past 17 years. In 1997 she completed graduate training in conservation, with a specialization in textiles, at the Winterthur / University of Delaware Program in Art Conservation. She is a... Read More →
avatar for Julio M. del Hoyo-Meléndez

Julio M. del Hoyo-Meléndez

Research Scientist, National Museum in Krakow
Julio M. del Hoyo-Meléndez holds a PhD in science and conservation of cultural heritage from the Department of Conservation and Restoration of Cultural Heritage of the Polytechnic University of Valencia, Spain. He received a bachelor’s and a master’s degree in chemistry... Read More →
avatar for Ellen Pearlstein-[Fellow]

Ellen Pearlstein-[Fellow]

Professor, UCLA/Getty Program in the Conservation of Archaeological and Ethnographic Materials
Ellen Pearlstein is a professor and member of the founding faculty in the UCLA/Getty Program in the Conservation of Archaeological and Ethnographic Material, where she teaches graduate classes in the conservation of organic materials, ethics of working with indigenous communities... Read More →



Monday May 29, 2017 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Michigan 1A-B Concourse Level, East Tower

2:30pm

Art Deco and Decadence Walk
Limited Capacity full

During this walking tour travel back in time to the late 1920's. Discover how hot jazz and secret speakeasies kept nightlife ablaze despite Prohibition. See the emergence of Art Deco and its place in the architectural history of Chicago. Cost =$25

3:30pm

ECPN Poster Lightning Round
The Emerging Conservation Professionals Network (ECPN) is excited to host our first Poster Session Lightning Round! This fun and informal event will highlight the contributions of emerging conservation professionals to the Annual Meeting Poster Session. Selected participants will each give a very short presentation—essentially an "elevator pitch”—on their poster topic and have an opportunity to field questions from colleagues.

The posters featured during the Lightning Round represent a wide range of specializations, types of collections, and areas of scientific research. Join us to hear authors discuss the conservation treatments of comic books, clocks, costumes, a Hopi doll and Victorian dollhouses. Attendees will gain insight into the challenges faced in addressing bedbug infestations and establishing documentation practices in archives, and learn about innovative materials used for varnish removal on Old Master paintings and for loss compensation in Modern design objects. Exciting advances in material characterization techniques and successful interdisciplinary collaborations will also be presented. 

Conference attendees at any career stage are welcome and encouraged to attend this event! We invite participants and audience members to stay for a Happy Hour reception immediately after the event.

The following posters will be discussed during the Lightning Round:

Conservation in Miniature: The merger of museum objects and historic interiors in the conservation of a Victorian era dollhouse, Sarah Giffin
 
The Alfred Stieglitz Collection: Photographs - Conservation and Art Historical Data goes digital at the Art Institute of Chicago, Kaslyne O'Connor, Ariel Pate, Sylvie Penichon

Applying Fills to Losses in a Polyurethane Foam Chair at the Museum of Modern Art, Alexandra Nichols

Chemical cleaning and Intervention criteria in a brass dial clock from the XIX century, João Henrique Ribeiro Barbosa, Luiz Antônio Cruz Souza

History, Treatment, and Preparation for Digitization of 14th century Estate Rolls, Annabel Pinkney

Treatment and Reconstruction of a Badly Damaged Hopi Katsina Doll Made of Gourd
, Haley Monroe

Towards Noninvasive Characterization of Black Drawing Media, Nathan Daly, Lynn Lee, Michelle Sullivan, Karen Trentelman  

Bedbugs: A Pesky Problem, Meredith Wilcox-Levine

Treatment of a Shattered Bark Basket from Australia, Marci Jefcoat Burton

Lifting the Microfiber Veil: Utilizing Evolon fabric at the Mauritshuis to remove aged varnish from Hendrick Heerschop's A Visit to the Doctor, Julie Ribits

Captain America Encounters Klucel M, Cathie Magee, Michiko Adachi

Under close observation – a pilot study monitoring change in objects' conditions, Ashley Freeman, Foekje Boersma, Jim Druzik, Joel Taylor, Michal Lukomski, Vincent Beltran

Stabilization of Urushi (Japanese lacquer) Based Asian Metallic Threads, Elinor Dei Tos Pironti

(I Can't Get No) Documentation: Preservation Reporting in the Archives, Marissa Vassari, Julia Welby


Moderator(s)
avatar for Rebecca Gridley

Rebecca Gridley

Assistant Conservator, Objects Conservation Department, The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Rebecca holds a BA in Art History from Yale University, and an MS in Conservation and MA in Art History & Archaeology from the Conservation Center, The Institute of Fine Arts, NYU. She is currently an Assistant Conservator in the Objects Conservation Department at The Metropolitan... Read More →
avatar for Michelle Sullivan

Michelle Sullivan

Assistant Conservator, Department of Paper Conservation, J. Paul Getty Museum
Michelle Sullivan is Assistant Conservator of Drawings at the J. Paul Getty Museum. She holds an M.S. and Certificate of Advanced Study in Art Conservation from the Winterthur/University of Delaware Program in Art Conservation and a B.A. in the Art History and Studio Art from the... Read More →

Speaker(s)
avatar for João Henrique Ribeiro Barbosa

João Henrique Ribeiro Barbosa

Substitute Professor, Federal University of Minas Gerais (UFMG)
João Henrique Ribeiro Barbosa has a BA in Cultural Heritage Artifact Conservation and Restoration from the School of Fine Arts at the Federal University of Minas Gerais (EBA-UFMG). He is in the second year of the master's program in Cultural Heritage Preservation offered by School... Read More →
avatar for Marci Jefcoat Burton

Marci Jefcoat Burton

Graduate Student, UCLA/Getty Master\'s Program
Marci Jefcoat Burton is a graduate student in her last year with the UCLA/Getty Conservation of Archeological and Ethnographic Materials program. After graduating from California State University, Sacramento with a BA in Forensic Chemistry and a Minor in Art History, she gained experience... Read More →
avatar for Nathan Daly

Nathan Daly

Postdoctoral Fellow, Getty Conservation Institute
avatar for Ashley Freeman

Ashley Freeman

Research Lab Associate, Getty Conservation Institute
Ashley Freeman joined the GCI in 2016 to work on the Managing Collections Environments Initiative. She graduated from Queen's University with a M.A.C. in Conservation Science, received a study certificate for restoration and conservation from the Lorenzo de' Medici, MS in Chemistry... Read More →
avatar for Sarah Giffin

Sarah Giffin

Assistant Conservator, RLA Conservation
Sarah Giffin is an assistant objects conservator for the Los Angeles studio of RLA Conservation. She graduated with an MA and an MSc in Conservation for Archaeology and Museums from University College London in 2016. Prior to working at RLA she worked for the National Park Service... Read More →
avatar for Catherine Magee

Catherine Magee

Mellon Fellow in Book Conservation, The Walters Art Museum
Cathie Magee is a 2016 graduate of the Winterthur/University of Delaware Program in Art Conservation, where she studied Library and Archives Conservation with a minor concentration in Conservation of Photographic Materials. During graduate school, she completed summer internships... Read More →
avatar for Hayley Monroe

Hayley Monroe

Master's Student, UCLA/Getty Program for the Conservation of Archaeological and Ethnographic Materials
Hayley Monroe is a third year student in the UCLA/Getty Master’s Program in the Conservation of Archaeological and Ethnographic Materials. She graduated from Mount Holyoke College with a BA in Classics. She gained field experience in the conservation of ceramics, metals, glass and... Read More →
avatar for Alexandra Nichols

Alexandra Nichols

Sherman Fairchild Foundation Fellow, Metropolitan Museum of Art
Alexandra Nichols is a Sherman Fairchild Foundation Fellow at the Metropolitan Museum of Art focusing on the conservation of time-based media art. Prior to the Met, she completed a Samuel H. Kress Foundation Fellowship in Time-based Media at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum. In 2016... Read More →
avatar for Kaslyne O'Connor

Kaslyne O'Connor

Paper Conservator
Kaslyne O’Connor is paper conservator in private practice. She was previously the Assistant Conservator at the Provincial Archives of Alberta, where she focused on the treatment and rehousing of damaged archival maps, prints, and records. She came to Edmonton directly from Chicago... Read More →
avatar for Annabel Pinkney

Annabel Pinkney

Student, The Ohio State University
Annabel Pinkney is an undergraduate student at the Ohio State University majoring in chemistry and minoring in the history of art. Annabel has been working as a student assistant at the University Libraries Technical Center preservation unit at Ohio State for two years, apprenticing... Read More →
avatar for Elinor Dei Tos Pironti

Elinor Dei Tos Pironti

Textile Conservator, Fashion Institute of Technology
I am a recent graduate of the Fashion Institute of Technology's, Fashion and Textiles Studies program in NYC.  I am in the process of opening a small conservation studio in Brooklyn, with the intention of working on small private conservation projects and to be available to work... Read More →
avatar for Julie Ribits

Julie Ribits

NEH Fellow in Paintings Conservation, Chrysler Museum of Art
Julie Ribits is a graduate of the SUNY Buffalo State Art Conservation Program, class of 2016. Julie completed a bachelor's double degree in Art (Printmaking) and Art History (Northern European Renaissance) from the University of Minnesota, with continued studies in Organic Chemistry... Read More →
MV

Marissa Vassari

Assistant Archivist and Educator, Rockefeller Archive Center
avatar for Meredith Wilcox-Levine

Meredith Wilcox-Levine

Textile Conservator, Textile Conservation Workshop
Textile Conservator at the Textile Conservation Workshop. 2015 Graduate from the University of Rhode Island, with internships at the Museum of Fine Arts Boston and the National Museum of American History.



Monday May 29, 2017 3:30pm - 5:30pm
Crystal Ballroom A Lobby Level, West Tower

4:00pm

Eastland Disaster: an Augmented Reality Tour
Limited Capacity seats available

John Russick and Alan Rhodes of the Chicago History Museum provide a tour of the site of the Eastland Disaster in downtown Chicago. This Augmented Reality (AR) mobile app creatively interprets images from the Chicago History Museum's massive photo archive and brings them back to the site where they were originally recorded. The app, called Chicago 00, is a new kind of experience with historical imagery. The AR technology and the user experience provide an opportunity to talk about digital preservation, mobile interpretation, and the future of historical collections.

Cost: $25

Speaker(s)
avatar for Geoffrey Alan Rhodes

Geoffrey Alan Rhodes

Full-Time Faculty, Department of Visual Communication Design, School of the Art Institute of Chicago
Geoffrey Alan Rhodes is a writer, artist, and film maker. He works across disciplines to create, for viewers and users, experiences which challenge the borders between the real and the virtual, the cinematic and the actual, fine art and popular experience. His work is a convolvement... Read More →
avatar for John Russick​

John Russick​

Vice President for Interpretation and Education, Chicago History Museum
John Russick​ is the vice president for interpretation and education at the Chicago History Museum. Since 1998, he has led the development of a host of exhibitions and digital experiences for the Museum. Prior to that, he held positions at Chicago’s Field Museum and the National... Read More →



4:00pm

STASH FLASH IV
At the item or collection level, storage solutions are often part of a treatment plan, and often provide the basis for continuity in collections care. This year's conference theme addresses treatment and collections care programs that are designed to prolong the lifetime of cultural property. To complement this year's theme, The STASH FLASH session will focus on storage and support solutions can avert the need for treatment by removing the need for intervention or enhancing a complex treatment.

Speaker(s)
avatar for Rachael Perkins Arenstein-[PA]

Rachael Perkins Arenstein-[PA]

Partner, AM Art Conservation LLC
Rachael Perkins Arenstein is a Professional Associate member of the American Institute for Conservation. She is a principal of A.M. Art Conservation, LLC, the private practice that she co-founded in 2009. She has worked at the Bible Lands Museum Jerusalem, the Smithsonian's National... Read More →
avatar for Lisa Goldberg

Lisa Goldberg

Conservator, Goldberg Preservation Services, LLC
Project leader for STASH, AIC News Editor and conservator in private practice. Lisa Goldberg is a private conservator with a focus on preventive care as well as health and safety issues. She is a member of SPNHC and AAM, and is a Professional  Associate of AIC. As long time editor... Read More →



Monday May 29, 2017 4:00pm - 6:00pm
Michigan 1A-B Concourse Level, East Tower

5:30pm

Publications Committee Meeting
Publications Committee meeting, by invitation.

Monday May 29, 2017 5:30pm - 6:30pm
Atlanta

5:30pm

ECPN Happy Hour
Meet in Crystal Foyer for bus transportation to The Conservation Center.


Monday May 29, 2017 5:30pm - 7:00pm
The Conservation Center 400 N. Wolcott, Chicago, IL 60622

5:30pm

A Facilitated Conversation about Inclusion and Equity in Conservation and Preservation
Limited Capacity filling up

This workshop will focus on the ways in which we as conservators of cultural heritage include or exclude people and their perspectives, and how we may begin to actively recognize this dynamic in order to pursue a more inclusive and equitable professional practice. Through discussions led by Chicago-based activist Nikhil Trivedi, participants will explore concepts of power and privilege and how these dynamics play out in our professional relationships, including one-on-one interactions, team situations and more broadly within our institutions and/or professional work environments.  Facilitator-led conversations will explore the ways in which race, gender, sexual orientation, socio-economic status, etc. influence the power dynamics in these relationships, and identify strategies for recognizing and consciously shifting these dynamics.  The goal of this workshop is to raise awareness about inclusion and equity (or lack thereof) within our field so as to effect change in our professional practice through both short-term and long-term actions.
The workshop organizers encourage participation from conservators working in all areas of the field, including museums, universities, libraries, archives and in private practice. Pizza and drinks will be provided. 

Moderator(s)
avatar for Lisa Marie Pickens

Lisa Marie Pickens

Independent Consultant to Nonprofits, including Philanthropy
Specializing in Organizational Development, Strategic Planning, Research and Evaluation with an Asset Based and Participatory Approach
avatar for Nikhil Trivedi

Nikhil Trivedi

I'm an application developer at a museum in Chicago and a social justice activist. My activism work focuses on ending rape culture and patriarchy through my role as a volunteer educator for Rape Victim Advocates. I'm also a regular contributor at The Incluseum, co-creator of visitorsofcolor.tumblr.com... Read More →

Speaker(s)
avatar for Manju Rajendran

Manju Rajendran

Manju Rajendran is a member of AORTA as of October 1, 2015. Manju also works for Vimala’s Curryblossom Cafe, her family’s food justice restaurant in Chapel Hill, North Carolina. She presently serves on the national committee of the War Resisters League and as a board member of the ACLU of North Carolina. Manju brings 22 years of local, state, regional, and national-level experience in liberation education, strategy, fundraising, community organizing, and communications. Her work is grounded in popular education pedagogy. Manju has shared her skills in projects including grassroots organizing efforts, cooperatives, transformative justice experiments, popular education and oral history spaces, environmental justice organizations, progressive publications, and statewide campaigns. She loves how creative resiliency-building, collective healing work, and nourishing meals integrate with social transformation. Manju is a queer, working class, South Asian immigrant woman who grew up in North Carolina. Her father or, AORTA (Anti-Oppression Resource and Training Alliance)
Manju Rajendran is a member of AORTA as of October 1, 2015. Manju also works for Vimala's Curryblossom Cafe, her family's food justice restaurant in Chapel Hill, North Carolina. She presently serves on the national committee of the War Resisters League and as a board member of the... Read More →

Sponsors
avatar for Association of North American Graduate Programs in the Conservation (ANAGPIC)

Association of North American Graduate Programs in the Conservation (ANAGPIC)

The Association of North American Graduate Programs in the Conservation of Cultural Property (ANAGPIC) is an organization comprising universities located in North America that offer graduate programs in the field of art conservation. Each association member's primary mission is to... Read More →
avatar for Equity and Inclusion Working Group

Equity and Inclusion Working Group

AIC formed the Equity and Inclusion working group in December of 2016 to formalize AIC's commitment to the issues of equity and inclusion within the organization and the field of conservation at large.
avatar for Suzanne Deal Booth

Suzanne Deal Booth

Suzanne Deal Booth, a philanthropist, arts advisor and collector, has long been committed to the recognition, preservation and conservation of visual arts and cultural heritage. A native of Texas, Deal Booth graduated cum laude with a degree in art history from Rice University followed... Read More →
avatar for Tru Vue

Tru Vue

Museum and Conservation Liaison, Tru Vue, Inc.
With over 45 years of proven protection and preservation, Tru Vue fine art acrylic and glass solutions, including Optium® Acrylic Glazing and UltraVue® Laminated Glass, are trusted by conservation and fine art professionals to protect and display the most celebrated artworks in... Read More →



Monday May 29, 2017 5:30pm - 9:30pm
Field Museum - Lecture Room 2

6:30pm

Architecture River Cruise
Limited Capacity filling up

Start your Annual Meeting experience off right – join your colleagues for the "must-do tour” when in Chicago. AIC will offer the Chicago History Museum River Cruise on a private boat. In 90 minutes, you will get the story of Chicago's history and architecture while serenely floating down the river bathed in the soft light of sunset. Regardless of whether this is your first or 51st trip to Chicago this experience is not to be missed. Catch up with colleagues and meet new friends as Chicago's world class architecture welcomes us to the city. Cost $49. Beer, Wine, and Soft Drinks will be inculded in the cost.  Meet in the Crystal Foyer at 6:30 pm to walk over to the boat.


 
Tuesday, May 30
 

8:15am

(Opening General Session) Welcome and Awards Presentation (Part 1)
Join us at 8:15 am for the start of an action-packed General Session. AIC President Pam Hatchfield will welcome attendees and introduce Paula Gangopadhyay of IMLS. The Keck Award will be presented to Gary Albright, Judith Levinson, & James Hamm.

Speaker(s)
avatar for Pamela Hatchfield-[Fellow]

Pamela Hatchfield-[Fellow]

Head of Objects Conservation, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston
Pamela Hatchfield is the Robert P. and Carol T. Henderson Head of Objects Conservation at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. She received her Master’s degree in Art History and Certificate in Conservation from the Institute of Fine Arts at New York University, with an advanced... Read More →


Tuesday May 30, 2017 8:15am - 9:00am
Regency Ballroom Ballroom Level, West Tower

8:45am

(Health & Safety) Respirator Fit Testing
The Respirator Fit Test process is NEW and IMPROVED!

What's new?
  • Online lecture! That means no more conflicts with Annual Meeting programming!
  • More options for medical evaluations! Medical evaluations can be provided through AIC (and are included in the price of the fit test), or you can still see your own doctor.
  • CIPP members get a discount! FREE Fit Test if you sign up for the CIPP Seminar!

Whether you are using hazardous chemicals in your laboratory or working with mold-infested artifacts after a flood, you need to be sure you are protected with a properly fitting respirator. This workshop will provide the participant with access to an online lecture on respirator selection, care, and use as well as a 20-minute, individual appointment for a personal respirator fit test to ensure an acceptable face-to-facepiece seal/fit of their respirator.  This AIC Respirator Fit Test Program is targeted towards conservators who may not have access to a Safety Professional to conduct the test or do not have respirator fit testing available through their employer, but is open to all interested parties.  This workshop is in accordance with the U.S. OSHA Standard (29CFR1910.134 - Respiratory Protection). The online lecture and fit test appointments will be conducted by a Certified Industrial Hygienist.  

Individuals wishing to be fit for a respirator MUST:
  1. Register for and attend a 20-minute fit test appointment at the Annual Meeting.

  2. Complete a REQUIRED medical evaluation within the twelve months PRIOR to fit testing. 

  3. Watch the REQUIRED online lecture and take the corresponding quiz. 
Fit test appointments will be scheduled in 20 minute intervals from 9:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m on Tuesday May 30, 2017. The individual appointment is also an opportunity for participants to ask any specific questions and to try a variety of half-mask, air-purifying respirators, if they are interested in finding a new respirator. Please bring your personal respirator if you have and use one. 

Participants must complete the OSHA Respirator Medical Evaluation Questionanire prior to the fit test and have it reviewed by their own healthcare professional (at their own expense) or the clinic contracted by AIC (included in the registration fee). All forms can be found at http://www.conservation-us.org/fittest.

Registrants will be directly contacted by the Health & Safety Committee to provide a link to the online lecture, discusss medical evaluation options and to facilitate scheduling appointments.

With the generous support of the Conservators in Private Practice (CIPP) Specialty Group, fit tests are being offered for free or at a discounted price to CIPP members. Registrants who attend the CIPP Seminar can select to have a free fit test.  All other CIPP members will receive a 50% discount.

Appointments are limited, so register now!

Cost: $60 (non-CIPP members) /$30 (CIPP members) /$0 (if you register for the CIPP seminar!)

Moderator(s)
avatar for Tara D. Kennedy

Tara D. Kennedy

Conservator, Yale University Library
avatar for Anne Kingery Schwartz-[PA]

Anne Kingery Schwartz-[PA]

Principal Objects Conservator, Kingery Conservation LLC
Anne Kingery-Schwartz is an objects conservator in private practice in Washington DC. Since starting her business in 2011, she’s worked for various Smithsonian museums, other local institutions, and private clients. Prior to going into private practice, Anne worked at the Philadelphia... Read More →


Tuesday May 30, 2017 8:45am - 5:00pm
Toronto Ballroom Level, West Tower

9:00am

(Opening General Session) Revision & Reflection; The Conservation/Restoration project of the Ghent Altarpiece
In October 2012 the Royal Institute for Cultural Heritage began a five-year conservation/restoration campaign for the Ghent Altarpiece painted by the Van Eyck brothers (1432). After an extensive preliminary study in 2010 it was decided that the main focus of the project would be a conservation treatment carried out in three phases rather than a comprehensive restoration. This treatment would take place in front of the public in the Museum of Fine Arts Ghent (Belgium) where an exhibition gallery was redesigned as a conservation studio. With the first phase finished (two years behind the initial schedule) we could look back on how this conservation treatment took a completely different turn after the varnish removal. The paper will focus on how, although a comprehensive pre-study was conducted, unforeseen findings resulted in a reconsideration of the scope of the project. What are the implications when one changes course mid treatment? How do you challenge decisions that were made well before the conservation team was assembled? How to neutrally address significant financial and timing consequences to all the different stakeholders, when the conservators are challenged on what the outcome of the revised treatment should be? What is the impact of these changes for the future two phases of the project? These thorny issues will be addressed by the author`s personal experiences in these unique circumstances as the projects on-site coordinator for the past four years. This case study could be of particular interest to the American conservation community, as strict oversight from multiple entities (both religious and political) is a more common occurrence in Europe.

Speaker(s)
avatar for Bart Devolder

Bart Devolder

Onsite Coordinator for the Restoration of the Ghent Altarpiece, Royal Institute for Cultural Heritage
Bart J. C. Devolder received his M.A. in painting conservation in 2002 at the Royal Academy of Fine Arts Antwerp, Belgium. He held internships at the Akademia Sztuk Pieknych Krakow, Poland, the Royal Institute for Cultural Heritage (KIK-IRPA), Brussels and at the Musée du Louvre... Read More →



Tuesday May 30, 2017 9:00am - 9:30am
Regency Ballroom Ballroom Level, West Tower

9:30am

(Opening General Session) When An Airplane Acts Like a Painting: Applying Established Conservation Methodologies to Ephemeral Aircraft Materials
Large scale, functional material culture has long suffered the onus of being considered somewhat exempt from established stewardship practices. This is primarily the result of the impracticalities and fiscal limitations of caring for macro artifacts but also the deference that most conservators have paid to traditional restoration practices. This paper will illustrate one example of how a conservator's understanding of materials and modes of deterioration has altered long-established practices for treating ephemeral materials. Doped fabric is not often found in the fine art world, but is ubiquitous to the collection at the National Air and Space Museum (NASM). Doping is the practice of applying a waterproof coating to fabric which also serves to shrink the material over a rigid structure. A doped surface is traditionally made of multiple coats of clear cellulosic resins with light blocking layers and final decorative finishes over a cotton or linen fabric. Because of the inherent chemical instability of the cellulosic resins and the requirement for scheduled inspections of the structures beneath, doped fabric materials have long been considered to be dispensable and expected to be replaced during routine operational maintenance or during a restoration. However, when viewed as a multi-media artifact with inherent preservation challenges similar to those in other realms of conservation, a new approach can be devised. Comparing the similarities and recognizing the differences between doped fabric structures and canvas paintings inspired a new treatment methodology for preserving historic aircraft fabric. This concept represents a major departure from the long-standing restoration traditions at NASM. A new approach to preserving doped fabric structures will be illustrated through the treatment of the control surfaces on a World War Two Martin B-26 Marauder, named "Flak Bait”. The case study will detail materials analysis, decision-making processes, encountered problems and solutions, loss compensation and varnish selection. It will also emphasize how the benefits of cross-disciplinary collaboration, coupled with practical research has influenced these innovative and adaptive treatments and altered established methodologies.

Speaker(s)
avatar for Lauren Horelick

Lauren Horelick

Object Conservator, National Air and Space Museum
Lauren Horelick has a BFA in Sculpture from the San Francisco Art Institute, a BA in art conservation and anthropology from the University of Delaware, and an MA in archaeological and ethnographic conservation from University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA)/Getty Conservation... Read More →

Co-Author(s)
avatar for Malcolm Collum

Malcolm Collum

Engen Conservation Chair and Chief Conservator, Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum
Malcolm Collum is the Engen Conservation Chair at the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum and has been the Chief Conservator since 2008. He has a B.A. from the University of Minnesota and an M.A. and Certificate of Advanced Study in Art Conservation from Buffalo State College... Read More →


Tuesday May 30, 2017 9:30am - 10:00am
Regency Ballroom Ballroom Level, West Tower

10:00am

Break in the Exhibit Hall

Tuesday May 30, 2017 10:00am - 10:30am
Riverside West Exhibit Hall Exhibit Level, East Tower

10:30am

(Opening General Session) Award Presentations (Part 2)
Award Presentations for: Allied Professional: Teri Rofkar (pos), Honorary Membership: Stephen Koob & Terry Drayman-Weisser

Tuesday May 30, 2017 10:30am - 10:45am
Regency Ballroom Ballroom Level, West Tower

10:50am

(Opening General Session) Preventive Conservation in the Renovation of the Harvard Art Museums: Before, During, and Ever After
The Harvard Art Museums reopened in 2014 after a six-year renovation and closure. Conservation involvement in the planning of this building project influenced all art-related spaces, processes, and procedures. This talk reflects on the question: what is the role of conservation in a museum renovation project? The success of conservation initiatives relies on effective collaboration, predominantly with professionals outside our field. We must cultivate trusting relationships with museum colleagues to get approval, support, and funding. This talk will share three projects from the Harvard Art Museums' renovation that demonstrate preventive conservation practiced through communication and collaboration: a large scale materials testing program, the integration of light sensitive materials throughout new galleries, and a program of gallery art incident tracking and response. Each program demonstrates the importance and power of collaboration in preventive conservation. A materials testing program was devised for the design and construction of two consecutive major building projects, totaling 77,000 square feet of art spaces. Conservators, conservation scientists, and administrators played integral roles in the design and planning process. They devised a materials testing program, primarily using the Oddy test, to review all construction materials proposed first for an interim facility and then for the renovated the Harvard Art Museums. The program sought to minimize harmful off-gassing of construction materials by making the best choices of materials where possible, understanding that concessions would be necessary. Over eight years of testing, 900+ materials were evaluated for use. Lessons learned will be shared about this ongoing program. A new curatorial directive to integrate light sensitive materials throughout the museum's galleries (43,000 square feet) prompted the need for clear guidelines on exhibiting, lending, and teaching with light sensitive materials. While conservators initially perceived this charge as being in tension with the light-focused architectural design by Renzo Piano, they worked closely with architects and lighting engineers to understand the predicted effects of natural light in a building with 9500+ square feet of glass and to plan for optimal control of natural light with a system of 450+ operable and fixed shades. Conservators then developed and implemented a light monitoring program that measured light levels at 40 points throughout a full year to verify the predicted light effects, prescribe shade programming and focus on problematic areas. In response to concerns about visitors' frequent contact with art on view in the museum's intimate gallery spaces, a simple, collaborative program devised by Conservation, Collections Management, Security, and IT tracks and responds to gallery art incidents. With their standard duties, the museum's 46 security attendants record minor and major incidents on "Art Touch Cards.” The notes are compiled and the aggregate data is analyzed by a cross-departmental team, which identifies and diagnoses the objects suffering the most frequent incidents. The museum has made effective changes in response to the analyses, and the impact has been measurable. In addition to reduced incidents, the program has improved upkeep of non-art conditions in galleries, and, surprisingly, staff engagement.

Speaker(s)
avatar for Angela Chang, [PA]

Angela Chang, [PA]

Assistant Director and Conservator of Objects and Sculpture, Harvard Art Museums/Straus Center for Conservation and Technical Studies
Angela Chang is the Assistant Director of the Straus Center for Conservation and Technical Studies and Head of the Objects Lab at the Harvard Art Museums. She has special interests in preventive conservation, technical research, artist interviews, and project management. Her recent... Read More →

Co-Author(s)
avatar for Penley Knipe, [Fellow]

Penley Knipe, [Fellow]

Philip and Lynn Straus Senior Conservator of Works on Paper, Straus Center for Conservation and Technical Studies, Harvard Art Museums
Penley Knipe is the Head of the paper lab at the Harvard Art Museums and the Philip and Lynn Straus Senior Conservator of Works on Paper. Penley has worked at the Harvard Art Museums as a conservator since 1999. She was the Chair of the Book and Paper Group and she is a Fellow of... Read More →
avatar for Kate Smith

Kate Smith

Conservator of Paintings, Straus Center/Harvard Art Museums
Kate Smith is the Head of the Paintings Conservation Laboratory at the Straus Center for Conservation and Technical Studies, Harvard Art Museums. Kate was trained at the Buffalo State College Art Conservation Program where she received her MA and CAS in Art Conservation in 2001. She... Read More →


Tuesday May 30, 2017 10:50am - 11:15am
Regency Ballroom Ballroom Level, West Tower
  • Cost Free!
  • Audience All
  • Credit Renzo Piano designed atrium at the Harvard Art Museum. ©Paul Geffen CC BY-NC 2.0 via Wikimedia Commons

11:15am

(Opening General Session) What Would Anselm Do? Revisiting the treatment of Osiris and Isis
The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art acquired Osiris and Isis, an important mid-career painting by Anselm Kiefer, in 1987.  SFMOMA recently re-opened after a major expansion to accommodate the Fisher Family Collection of 20th century art, which includes masterworks by Anselm Kiefer.
Anselm Kiefer's oeuvre examines history and culture by means of incorporating potentially unstable and problematic materials (including straw, lead, found objects and industrial media).  Kiefer's works are often oversized, extremely heavy, fragile and vulnerable; they challenge the norms of stewardship.  Osiris and Isis exemplifies Kiefer's use of mixed techniques and found objects, which are included in a composition of massive size.  The painting has required treatment intervention at regular intervals since its acquisition.
This presentation will trace the trajectory of care Osiris and Isis has received over several decades.  Treatments of the painting which did not age well over time will be discussed.  A cross-disciplinary treatment which would have deviated from standard practice was recently considered.  The proposed treatment for the painting was revised after the artist was brought into the discussion.  A relationship of trust between SFMOMA, Kiefer and his studio was created once Kiefer became involved with the project.
SFMOMA's engagement with artists can provide guidance for the care of artworks and serves as a starting point for successful museum activities involving the Museum's Artist Initiative, Curatorial, Collections and Education programs.
We now have a much better understanding of "what Anselm Kiefer would do" when concerns and questions arise regarding the conservation and exhibition of his works.  As we continue our dialog with the Kiefer studio, we plan to carry out more in-depth study, research and treatment of the SFMOMA/Fisher Kiefer Collection.

Speaker(s)
avatar for Paula De Cristofaro, [PA]

Paula De Cristofaro, [PA]

Paintings Conservator, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art
Paula De Cristofaro has worked in the SFMOMA Conservation Department since 1990. Prior to joining the staff at SFMOMA, she worked at the National Gallery of Art in Washington D.C. and at the Cleveland Museum of Art in Cleveland Ohio. She completed the Conservation Training Program... Read More →


Tuesday May 30, 2017 11:15am - 11:40am
Regency Ballroom Ballroom Level, West Tower

11:40am

(Opening General Session) Henri Matisse: The Cut-Outs
In 2014 The Museum of Modern Art opened a landmark exhibition centered on the final chapter of Matisse's long career, the cut-outs. The largest Matisse cut-out exhibition ever mounted, it had as its central work one of MoMA's most beloved attractions, The Swimming Pool. This large, room-sized cut-out was not only the centerpiece of the exhibition, its conservation was the genesis of the show. This exhibition was the first time that a conservator at MoMA, Karl Buchberg, was also a curator of an exhibition; sharing this title with Jodi Hauptman, Senior Curator of Drawings and Prints. The Swimming Pool was created in 1952 in the dining room of Matisse's Cimiez-Nice apartment. Matisse's assistants would paint sheets of paper with Linel gouache which were then dried and stored. When Matisse wanted a particular color, a sheet would be brought to him which he would then cut into a desired shape. A studio assistant would then take the cut shape and pin it on the studio wall according to Matisse's instructions. The Swimming Pool consisted solely of ultramarine blue painted paper shapes on a frieze of white Canson paper pinned to the burlap lined walls of the dining room. After his death in 1954 it was permanently mounted by the Parisian firm Lefebvre-Foinet. The work was divided into nine panels; the blue shapes were adhered to the white paper frieze which was then adhered to new burlap, chosen by Matisse's widow as it was the only fabric faithful to the original conception. When MoMA acquired the work in 1975, the white paper was stained, the ultramarine blue shapes were unevenly decolorized from the contact with the acidic burlap and the burlap itself severely darkened. My predecessor, Antoinette King, removed the staining in the white paper during a lengthy treatment. The blue cut-outs and the burlap were not treated. In 2009 I decided to carry out a treatment with three goals: to replace the discolored burlap to return the work to its original color balance, to increase the height of the new panels to re-create the original dimensions of the work and to re-install the work in a room that re-created the original floor plan. Although the white paper frieze was not original--- it had been newly added during the first mounting,---I chose not to replace it. It was approximately the same age as the blue cut shapes and had a similar patina. The most radical decision was not to re-adhere the white frieze and blue cut shapes on new fabric, but instead to pin them on the newly fabricated panels. This re-created the original pinned aspect of the work and minimized any further acid induced damage. This paper aims to describe the treatment choices for this work and illustrate how these choices came to inform the cut-out exhibition as a whole, highlighting the relationship and collaboration between conservator and curator.

Speaker(s)
avatar for Karl Buchberg

Karl Buchberg

Senior Conservator (Retired), Museum of Modern Art
Karl Buchberg has a B.A. from Columbia University and a M.A. and Diploma in Conservation from New York University. Before coming to The Museum of Modern Art he was the Conservator of Rare Books and Special Collections at the Firestone Library of Princeton University. From 1984 to... Read More →


Tuesday May 30, 2017 11:40am - 12:05pm
Regency Ballroom Ballroom Level, West Tower

12:05pm

(Opening General Session) Award Presentations (Part 3)
Presentation of the Robert Feller Lifetime Achievement Award: Meg Loew Craft*, Patti Dumbaugh, President's Award

Tuesday May 30, 2017 12:05pm - 12:15pm
Regency Ballroom Ballroom Level, West Tower

12:15pm

(Opening General Session) Open Discussion
Tuesday May 30, 2017 12:15pm - 12:30pm
Regency Ballroom Ballroom Level, West Tower

12:30pm

Protecting the World’s Cultural Heritage: Identifying and Protecting Looted Artifacts
Cultural heritage is a non-renewable resource that often finds itself in jeopardy, affecting the plundered country and the entire global community. Experts believe that cultural racketeering supports terrorist organizations and extremist groups, and is one of the largest financial sources for international criminal activity. Nevertheless, it is not monitored or studied like the drug trade or wildlife trafficking. In this session, Northwestern University lecturer Oya Topçuoğlu will discuss the growing problem of looting of archaeological sites and the illegal trafficking of antiquities in Syria and Iraq. She will address the challenges of quantifying looting in conflict zones and tracking looted artifacts. Dr. Topçuoğlu will also discuss potential strategies and methods for identifying looted objects and the pressing need to inform dealers, collectors, and the general public about the wide-ranging effects of looting to curb demand on the art market for these objects. Eden Burgess, a partner with Cultural Heritage Partners, PLLC and an FAIC Board member, will review recent cases and legal issues involving looted antiquities. She will also discuss the potential consequences of collecting such objects, and how collectors and museums can meet the increasing pressure to acquire antiquities responsibly. Dawn Rogala, a paintings conservator with the Smithsonian Institution's Museum Conservation Institute, will speak about the expectations and limitations of working as a subject matter expert in cultural heritage cases. She will talk about what she has learned from law enforcement experts regarding the kinds of information that are useful to cultural heritage investigators and how to best present or discuss your findings with law enforcement agents and legal counsel.
A Learn with Lunch program, cost $39.

Speaker(s)
avatar for Dawn Rogala, [Fellow]

Dawn Rogala, [Fellow]

Paintings Conservator, Smithsonian Museum Conservation Institute
Dr. Rogala graduated from the MA/CAS program in art conservation at Buffalo State College of the State University of New York and received her PhD in preservation studies from the University of Delaware. She has authored and coauthored papers on materials behavior, paint analysis... Read More →
avatar for L. Burgess

L. Burgess

Attorney at Law, Cultural Heritage Partners, LLC
Eden’s practice focuses on art, cultural heritage, museum and intellectual property law. She has represented foreign states, museums, auction houses, major collectors, nonprofits and other entities in a wide variety of matters. She has litigated and settled complex claims involving... Read More →
avatar for Oya Topçuoğlu

Oya Topçuoğlu

Lecturer, Northwestern University
Oya Topçuoğlu received her PhD in Mesopotamian Art and Archaeology from the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations at the University of Chicago in 2016. Her teaching experience covers a range of subjects including modern Turkish language and culture, and history... Read More →


Tuesday May 30, 2017 12:30pm - 2:00pm
Acapulco Ballroom Level, West Tower

1:00pm

ECPN Informational Meeting
Moderator(s)
avatar for Rebecca Gridley

Rebecca Gridley

Assistant Conservator, Objects Conservation Department, The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Rebecca holds a BA in Art History from Yale University, and an MS in Conservation and MA in Art History & Archaeology from the Conservation Center, The Institute of Fine Arts, NYU. She is currently an Assistant Conservator in the Objects Conservation Department at The Metropolitan... Read More →
avatar for Michelle Sullivan

Michelle Sullivan

Assistant Conservator, Department of Paper Conservation, J. Paul Getty Museum
Michelle Sullivan is Assistant Conservator of Drawings at the J. Paul Getty Museum. She holds an M.S. and Certificate of Advanced Study in Art Conservation from the Winterthur/University of Delaware Program in Art Conservation and a B.A. in the Art History and Studio Art from the... Read More →

Tuesday May 30, 2017 1:00pm - 1:45pm
Columbian Concourse Level, West Tower

1:00pm

NCPTT Grants Presentation
The National Center for Preservation Technology and Training (NCPTT) will hold an informational session on it's grant program at the AIC's annual meeting. We will present a 20-25 minute overview of the grant program, how to apply, and highlight some of the latest technology advances from recent grant recipients. Learn about things like the Mesilla Valley Preservation Foundation's field kit for measuring salt attack in adobe or management strategies for climate change impacts on cultural landscapes by Oregon State University. There will be plenty of time for questions about the program as well as one-on-one time to discuss your ideas!

Speaker(s)
avatar for Mary F. Striegel, [Fellow]

Mary F. Striegel, [Fellow]

Chief of Materials Conservation, NCPTT
Mary F. Striegel is Chief of Materials Conservation at the National Center for Preservation Technology and Training. She heads up basic and applied research that focuses on evaluation of preservation treatments for preventing damage to cultural resources. She and her staff undertake... Read More →

Sponsors
avatar for National Center for Preservation Technology and Training

National Center for Preservation Technology and Training

The National Park Service’s National Center for Preservation Technology and Training protects America’s historic legacy by equipping professionals in the field of historic preservation with progressive technology-based research and training. Since its founding in 1994, NCPTT has... Read More →


Tuesday May 30, 2017 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Water Tower Concourse Level, West Tower

2:00pm

(Architecture + Wooden Artifacts) The Framing of a Masterpiece The History and Conservation of a Monumental Tabernacle Frame
In the past, Museums sometimes deferred the care and treatment of frames in favor of the treatment of the paintings they housed.  Often a new frame was selected over the old in accordance with changes in fashion, time and ownership.  The old frames were then deaccessioned or put in storage, resulting in areas bulging with discarded frames waiting to be reunited with an appropriate painting.   This benign neglect has now actually provided conservators with rare opportunities for proper conservation treatments of important historical frames.  In this paper, conservators William B. Adair and Stephan C. Wilcox, explain the various treatment options available and elucidate the rationale leading to the final decisions for conservation of the tabernacle frame for Bellini and Titian's The Feast of the Gods.  The tabernacle frame has now been conserved back to its intended finish.      The Feast of the Gods was originally commissioned by the Duke and Dutchess of Ferrara in 1514 as part of a series of paintings placed in an architectural setting for the Gonzaga's palazzo in Mantua.  The frame, complete with pilasters and polychrome entablature, is considered by some to be one the most important Renaissance paintings in America. In particular, the dilemma of what time in history a work of art should be presented to the viewer will be discussed. Starting in the mid 19th century, when the Camuccini brothers from Rome sold the Feast of the Gods to the 4th Duke of Northumberland, to the 1916 sale by London dealers Thomas Agnew and Arthur Sulley to Joseph Widener, and eventually bequeathed to the National Gallery of Art.

Speaker(s)
avatar for William Adair

William Adair

Gilding Conservator, International Institute for Frame Study
William Adair worked for the Smithsonian Institution's National Portrait Gallery for 10 years as a frame conservator. First trained as an artist, he then developed an expertise from Henry Heydenryk, in frame history and gilding techniques as practiced in European workshops. In 1982... Read More →

Co-Author(s)
avatar for Stephan Wilcox

Stephan Wilcox

Senior Frame Conservator (Retired), National Gallery of Art
Stephan C. Wilcox was the Senior Conservator of Frames at the National Gallery of Art for 29 years. Prior to joining the National Gallery of Art he worked for five years in the conservation studio at North Carolina Museum of Art in the frame conservation department. He started his... Read More →

Tuesday May 30, 2017 2:00pm - 2:30pm
Crystal Ballroom A Lobby Level, West Tower

2:00pm

(Book & Paper) Less is More
The current state of paper conservation is a often a dichotomy: respect for the history of the object and a desire to be more conservative in treatment decisions often conflicts with the intrusiveness of treatments that are used to achieve an acceptable aesthetic outcome. Our onus of reversibility, while striving for perfection, can cause the conservator to choose inaction over action. What about when action is warranted? How do we quantify a "good” treatment, first for the steward of the artwork, then for ourselves? Years of study have produced a treatment corpus that has steadily evolved, refining techniques to produce careful and successful reduction of damage. Yet, many of these techniques are invasive, perhaps unavoidably. The authors aim to show that invasiveness can be set to a scale. Working toward a theory of "in-and-out”, treatments can be tailored to reduce the conservator's imprint on a work of art. This paper will compare recently available techniques to those that are traditionally taught and used in paper conservation. For instance, overall discoloration treated with calcified water versus water adjusted to specific pH and conductivity; or, tidelines treated with sodium borohydride versus chelator gels. The hypothesis is that less invasive treatments can be carried out with excellent aesthetic results. 

Speaker(s)
avatar for Adam Novak

Adam Novak

Paper Conservator, Daria K. Conservation, LLC
Adam Novak is a paper conservator in private practice at Daria K Conservation in New York City, specializing in the conservation of modern and contemporary art on paper. He was previously a paper conservator for Special Collections at the Harvard Library.

Co-Author(s)
DK

Daria Keynan

Paper Conservator, Daria K. Conservation
Daria Keynan is a conservator of modern and contemporary art on paper in New York City. She has authored numerous conservation publications, and is an instructor for the AIC Professional Development Course "Cleaning and Conductivity: New Methods for Treating Paintings, Works on Paper... Read More →

Tuesday May 30, 2017 2:00pm - 2:30pm
Regency A-B Ballroom Level, West Tower

2:00pm

(Collection Care) Unhappy couples: degradation of microscope slides due to their mounting media
Natural history collections are known to have used diverse forms of coatings due to the varied nature of their specimens. In the case of micro-scale organisms and histologic samples, organic coatings have been employed to mount specimens to observe them under microscopes since the first half of the nineteenth century. Over time, various materials have been used to improve either the stability of the mount or the clarity of the specimens for observation. Consequently, there are numerous formulas for every substance employed in microscope preparations. Some of these materials have begun to degrade, leading to the loss of very important specimens. In some cases, the salvage of degrading specimens involves remounting the specimen. This poses problems because many of these mounting media are of unknown composition, making it difficult to choose a solvent that would remove it without damaging the specimen. A major survey is underway at the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History (NMNH) to identify mounting media that have held up well over time, or media that are degrading in order to determine the most appropriate treatment options. Meetings with the collections managers and curators have determined the collections to be surveyed within the museum. During examination, important features like crystallization of the mounting medium and the level of degradation are being documented. To date, over 300,000 slides have been surveyed from the Botany, Amphibians and Reptiles, Fishes, Birds, and Entomology collections. Of the total, less than 20% show signs of degradation. However, these numbers do not reflect the real conservation issues. From the nearly 28,000 slides observed in the Botany collection, only 3% show deterioration of the mounting medium, if yellowing of Canada Balsam is not considered, given that it does not affect observation under a microscope. Of the over 96,000 slides examined in Amphibians and Reptiles, around 6% show signs of deterioration. Most of these deteriorating slides are uncatalogued, meaning that the majority of the cataloged specimens show no deterioration. In the Fish collection, of the close to 27,000 slides reviewed, around 65% have issues. Some of the slides that are in perfect condition are a result of remounting efforts, meaning that they had badly deteriorated, suggesting that the actual numbers are even higher. The collection with the least deterioration is Birds, with only 9 crystallized slides out of 3,244. The Entomology collection has been partially surveyed. Of the over 139,000 slides observed, only 7% show deterioration. The most problematic mounting media for all the collections so far have been paraffin, Permount and Hoyer's. In addition to observation of the slides, the mounting medium preferred in the Botany Department, Thermo Scientific™ Shandon™ Synthetic Mountant was tested at the Smithsonian Museum Conservation Institute using ATR-FTIR. It provided a very good match to a copolymer of methyl methacrylate and butyl acrylate and showed additional peaks that may be attributed to a butyl phthalate. This mountant is extremely similar to Acryloid/Paraloid B-48, which would explain why after 40 years, the slides mounted with it show no deterioration.

Speaker(s)
avatar for Mariana Di Giacomo

Mariana Di Giacomo

Conservation Fellow, Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History
Mariana Di Giacomo is a paleontologist with special interest in fossil preservation. She graduated in 2012 with a Master in Zoology from the PEDECIBA at Universidad de la República, Montevideo, Uruguay. In 2006 and 2007 she received tutoring from fossil preparators at the Museo de... Read More →


Tuesday May 30, 2017 2:00pm - 2:30pm
Plaza Ballroom Lobby Level, East Tower

2:00pm

(Electronic Media) The Ballad of Little Bill: Collaboration in Time-Based Media Conservation
The Smithsonian American Art Museum (SAAM) owns and displays a growing collection of time-based media and digital art, including significant works of art by video art pioneer Nam June Paik. In 2009, the museum acquired Paik's complete estate archive, including his writings, correspondence, notes, sculptures, and studio effects. To commemorate Paik's legacy and profound influence on the art world, SAAM holds an annual birthday celebration in his honor and invites contemporary artists to exhibit a selected piece of artwork. For the 2016 Paik birthday celebration, Film and Media Arts Curator Michael Mansfield invited Brooklyn-based artists Lilla LoCurto and Bill Outcault to present their work titled "the willful marionette." One of thirteen time-based media artworks acquired by the museum that year, it is indicative of SAAM's increasingly diverse collection of media art. The kinetic sculpture combines sculpture, software, and electronics. The eponymous marionette Little Bill (Big Bill being artist Bill Outcault) is a 3-D printed, blue PLA plastic doll designed from scanned images of the artist himself. The marionette is not controlled by human hand, but rather by custom software that interfaces between a system of eleven stepper motors that move the doll, and two Microsoft Kinect cameras which serve as the doll's ‘eyes.' The marionette is thereby able to interact with its audience, and responds in real time to spontaneous human interaction with gestures of its own. Its range of different physical and digital components poses unique risks, a quality which is a frequent challenge to the conservation of contemporary media art. Ariel O'Connor, Objects Conservator, and Dan Finn, Media Conservator, will detail their efforts to effectively document the work's many facets during the installation and acquisition processes. The presentation aims to present a case study that is exemplary of the wide range of expertise that time-based media conservation can require, and the collaborative approach that it necessitates.

Speaker(s)
avatar for Ariel O'Connor-[PA]

Ariel O'Connor-[PA]

Objects Conservator, Smithsonian American Art Museum
Ariel O'Connor is an Objects Conservator at the Smithsonian American Art Museum's Lunder Conservation Center in Washington, DC. Prior to joining SAAM in 2016, Ariel worked at the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum, Walters Art Museum, Harvard Art Museums, and the Metropolitan... Read More →

Co-Author(s)
avatar for Daniel Finn

Daniel Finn

Conservator, Time-Based Media, Smithsonian American Art Museum
Dan Finn is currently the Time-Based Media Conservator at the Smithsonian American Art Museum. He graduated in 2014 with an MA in Moving Image Archiving and Preservation from New York University. He also worked with the Smithsonian Institution as a contractor for media preservation... Read More →

Tuesday May 30, 2017 2:00pm - 2:30pm
Comiskey Concourse Level, West Tower

2:00pm

(Objects) The Conservation of Della Robbia Sculpture: An Exhibition as Initiator of Work
This presentation will provide an introduction and launch to a group of consecutive talks on the conservation of glazed terracotta sculpture from the Italian Renaissance. The talks will cover both recent exhibition related conservation treatment on important works of three generations of the Della Robbia family and its related workshops, and selected other non-exhibition related treatment of this material. At the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, the exciting 2004 rediscovery in storage and subsequent treatment of Giovanni Francesco Rustici's monochromatic glazed terracotta figure of St. John the Baptist (ca 1505-15) became the impetus for a renewed focus on glazed terracotta sculpture, culminating in the exhibition Della Robbia: Sculpting with Color in Renaissance Florence (Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, August 9-December 4, 2016; and the National Gallery of Art, February 5-June 4, 2017). This exhibition, the first ever devoted to the Della Robbia in the United States, brought together forty-six works from 21 American collections (19 museums and 2 private) as well as several important Italian loans. This presentation will begin by outlining how the exhibition has stimulated conservation and technical research of these works in many lending collections. Beyond the exhibition itself, works from the Della Robbia and Buglioni workshops at several other institutions and private collections have been treated and studied, both in the US and internationally. Many of these projects will be presented in related talks. As the catalyst for the exhibition, the treatment of St. John the Baptist will be described. Decisions about the extent of final compensation were made with the curatorial input and included the restoration of key missing elements (finger, hoof, and neck). The treatment revealed information about the artist's working methods as he modeled the sculpture in the round and provides a jumping off point for comparison with the Della Robbia production.

Speaker(s)
avatar for Abigail Hykin

Abigail Hykin

Conservator, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston
Abigail Hykin is Conservator of Objects at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. Besides work on Della Robbia sculpture, her recent projects have included the treatment of a 12th century Chinese sculpture, Guanyin, Bodhisattva of Compassion and Nishida Jun’s massive ceramic Zetsu No... Read More →


Tuesday May 30, 2017 2:00pm - 2:30pm
Crystal Ballroom B Lobby Level, West Tower

2:00pm

(Paintings + Research & Technical Studies) Practice-led and practice-based collaborative research at Tate: supporting the advancement of modern and contemporary painting conservation treatment practice
Several collaborative practice-based and practice-led applied research projects involving Tate and other key partners will be discussed. These involve treating specific conservation problems or exploring specific artist or conservation materials; all of which ideally contribute to the advancement of conservation treatment methodologies and practice for modern and contemporary paintings. Examples include the recent Rothko Conservation Project [1], current EU-funded projects such as NANORESTART [2] and the Cleaning Modern Oil Paints (CMOP) [3], as well as the ongoing collaboration between Tate, the Dow Chemical Company and the Getty Conservation Institute [4]. These projects can involve international and national collaborations between painting conservators, heritage scientists, paint chemists, as well as academic and industrial partners; many of which have been underway for several years (in some cases prior to Tate's involvement). Key aims and outcomes of these projects will be outlined, alongside reflections on research processes, as well as the ongoing challenges and successes of translating research findings into practice. References 1. http://www.tate.org.uk/about/projects/rothko-conservation-project 2. http://www.nanorestart.eu/ 3. http://www.tate.org.uk/about/projects/cleaning-modern-oil-paints 4. Ormsby, B.A., Keefe, M.H., Phenix, A., von Aderkas, E., Learner, T., Tucker, C., and Kozak, C. (2016). ‘Mineral Spirits-based Microemulsions: A Novel Cleaning System for Acrylic and Other Modern Painted Surfaces'. Journal for the American Institute for Conservation. Issue 55-1, pp. 12-31.

Speaker(s)
avatar for Dr. Bronwyn Ormsby

Dr. Bronwyn Ormsby

Principal Conservation Scientist, Tate
Dr Bronwyn Ormsby is Principal Conservation Scientist at Tate. She manages the Conservation Science and Preventive Conservation department and leads Tate's contribution to the Nanorestart project.


Tuesday May 30, 2017 2:00pm - 2:30pm
Regency C-D Ballroom Level, West Tower

2:00pm

(Photographic Materials) Bellmer: Complexities of the Doll
Hans Bellmer (1902-1975), a German draftsman working in his own advertising company in the 1920s, strongly opposed Nazi fascism. In response to the Nazi Party, he stated he would no longer make work to support the new German state. In his revolt to German idealism, Bellmer constructed life-sized female dolls of which he photographed in provocative poses. The Nazi Party declared Bellmer's work "degenerate” so he fled Germany and moved to Paris where he was welcomed by the Surrealists. Bellmer's photographic production was not very large, with only around 150 images. Most of Bellmer's photographs are small in size and often delicately hand-colored. Bellmer produced fewer than thirty large prints, many of which were mounted to board and nailed to paintings stretchers. These "stretched” large prints were often hand-colored and exhibited in a style similar to paintings. In 2014, the Art Institute of Chicago acquired one of Bellmer's large doll photographs. The photograph is mounted to board, airbrushed overall, and overpainted with white gouache. It is missing its original stretcher although it still bears the holes from once having one. The piece has several areas with missing airbrush, giving the print areas of differential gloss. It has some large areas of loss and abrasions, which go through the print, making the brown mounting board visible. This paper will discuss the considerations, limitations, and outcomes involved when treating this rare, susceptible, one-of-a-kind photograph.

Speaker(s)
avatar for Krista Lough

Krista Lough

Andrew W. Mellon Fellow in Photograph Conservation, Art Institute of Chicago
Krista Lough is the Andrew W. Mellon Fellow in Photograph Conservation at the Art Institute of Chicago. She received a Bachelor’s degree in Fine Arts with Emphasis in Art History, Theory and Criticism form the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, where she focused on photography... Read More →


Tuesday May 30, 2017 2:00pm - 2:30pm
Michigan 1A-B Concourse Level, East Tower

2:00pm

(Textiles) You Say You Want a Revolution? An Innovative, Low-Tack Adhesive Treatment for 18th-Century Silk Flags
Flags and banners are our most patriotic national textiles. Often made of silk or thin wool bunting, they can be extremely fragile and require advanced conservation techniques for their preservation. 18th-century flags—scant few of which exist in the United States—present their own set of considerations. Revolutionary War-era flags are frequently painted and over-painted with oil-based, distemper, or other water-based paint that may have physically or chemically compromised the ground silk and resulted in flaking paint or loss of original material. American Revolutionary War-era silk flags can be remarkably sound compared to 19th-century silk flags; however they are frequently distorted and dished from use and display, presenting challenges for mounting. Due to these and other condition issues, conservators at Museum Textile Services have endeavored to find new techniques for safely stabilizing and mounting 18th-century silk flags. Our latest method is reversible, requires minimal handling and flipping of the flag, is successful with or without a sheer overlay, and is more time efficient. This presentation will illustrate this innovation with two c 1780 flags conserved in 2016, the Third Connecticut flag belonging to the New York Historical Society, and the Bucks of America flag belonging to the Massachusetts Historical Society and now on exhibit at the National Museum of African American History and Culture. Pros and cons of this technique compared to other conventional methods of lining and mounting flags and banners will be discussed. Applications of this revolutionary labor- and resource-saving treatment to the conservation of other textiles will also be clearly illustrated.

Speaker(s)
avatar for Camille Myers Breeze, [Fellow]

Camille Myers Breeze, [Fellow]

Director & Chief Conservator, Museum Textile Services
Camille Myers Breeze began her textile conservation career in 1989 at the Textile Conservation Workshop in South Salem, New York. After earning a BA in Art History from Oberlin College, she received an MA in Museum Studies: Costume and Textiles Conservation from the State University... Read More →


Tuesday May 30, 2017 2:00pm - 2:30pm
Crystal Ballroom C Lobby Level, West Tower

2:30pm

(Architecture + Wooden Artifacts) Aimee Spencer Gorham’s Wood Marquetry of the Pacific Northwest
The old growth forests of the Pacific Northwest provided the raw materials for the creation of a flourishing wood products industry during the late 19th and early 20th century. In 1905, the Lewis and Clark Exposition touted Portland, Oregon as an ideal "City Beautiful”, inspiring architects, artists and craftsmen to celebrate the regional beauty of pristine natural landscapes by building with native wood materials. It was in this forested backdrop that Aimee Spencer Gorham produced, from 1936 on, a series of site-specific large-scale wood marquetry murals under the WPA Federal Arts Project. She is best known for her work at Timberline Lodge, the greatest New Deal project of the area, where two of her pieces grace the walls of that temple to rustic regionalism. Under WPA programs, Gorham produced marquetry murals for Oregon State University's School of Forestry, Portland Public schools, regional art centers in Oregon, and for the New York World's Fair in 1939. She established a workshop of furniture makers from Timberline Lodge that executed her designs beyond the New Deal era into the 1950's. In 2015, efforts began for conservation treatment of Gorham's 1938 mural "Send Us Forth To Be Builders of a Better World", the first since its installation, and the first technical study of Gorham's work. The mural, measuring 128 square feet, was designed specifically for the entrance foyer of Chapman Elementary School in Portland. Gorham used an extensive selection of domestic and exotic wood veneers to achieve remarkably varied effects of chroma, grain and chatoyance, that were identified during treatment. The veneers were adhered to plywood panels that were only then gaining popularity for interior decorative wall paneling, built-in furniture and cabinetry for modern architectural applications. The plywood substrate, quite novel at the time, provided the structural stability that allowed Gorham to extend the dimensions of her compositions to grand formats, resulting in panels that have remained quite planar despite the unstable environmental conditions in which they have been housed. The Chapman mural had suffered considerable surface damage due to delamination of the veneer, scratches, vandalism, and inopportune previous coatings that had obscured the glowing figural effects of the wood grains. A group of conservators and researchers of diverse specialties (architectural, wood science, paintings, wood panel, objects) undertook the treatment, employing an interdisciplinary approach to address various aspects of the project. The mural was reinstalled in its original location in the summer of 2016. The paper will discuss the conservation treatment of "Send Us Forth to be Builders of a Better World", and the particular technical aspects of the marquetry mural, in the context of Aimee Gorham's opus and her access to new innovative engineered wood materials manufactured in the PNW. Gorham's marquetry was a unique product of her time and place that combined the Arts and Crafts-inspired ancient technique of marquetry with the newest, cutting-edge industrial wood products of the era, mechanical presses, and industrial furniture coatings.

Speaker(s)
avatar for Nina Olsson

Nina Olsson

Principal and owner, Nina Olsson Art Conservation, LLC
Nina Olsson is a researcher and conservator of paintings in private practice established in Portland, Oregon in 2001. Since 2015, Nina is also president and co-founder of Heritage Conservation Group, LLC, a consortium of Portland-based conservators of diverse specialties. Nina has... Read More →
avatar for Suzana Radivojevic

Suzana Radivojevic

Wood Scientist, Ligno Logic, LLC
Dr. Suzana Radivojevic is concurrently an Adjunct Faculty in the Historic Preservation Program at the University of Oregon, and a wood scientist and a founder of a research and consulting firm, Ligno Logic LLC. She received her B.Sc.F.E. in wood science and technology from the University... Read More →


Tuesday May 30, 2017 2:30pm - 3:00pm
Crystal Ballroom A Lobby Level, West Tower

2:30pm

(Book & Paper) Reducing agent tertbutylamine borane complex and its use in stain reduction on paper-based artifacts
Stain reduction is a sometimes necessary, but often ethically-loaded consideration in the treatment of art on paper. From the standpoint of cellulose stability, reducing agents are considered preferable to their oxidizing counterparts as they have the potential to mitigate discolorations without further degrading the polymer backbone of paper artifacts. While a number of oxidizing agents have been tried with paper substrates, sodium borohydride has long been the primary, if only, reducing agent. Recent work with gellan gum at the Canadian Conservation Institute has brought another reducing agent to the attention of their paper conservators: tertbutylamine borane complex (TBAB). Explored by Italian researchers and conservators since the late 1990's, borane complexes show great promise as an additional tool for reducing paper discolorations, but as of yet seem little known in North America. Several disadvantages of sodium borohydride (its tendency to evolve bubbles of hydrogen gas, the high working pH) are not present with TBAB, which shares borohydride's advantage of being soluble in both alcohol and aqueous systems. This paper will present the use of TBAB in the treatment of several watercolours by Canadian artist Lucius O'Brien, as well as on didactic paper artifacts. A discussion of the working properties, as well as the perceived advantages and challenges of using this reducing agent will ideally familiarize more paper conservators with this relatively new reducing agent, broadening their choice of stain reduction agents.

Speaker(s)
avatar for Crystal Maitland

Crystal Maitland

Conservator - Paper, Canadian Conservation Institute
Crystal Maitland joined the Canadian Conservation Institute in 2015 as their Works of Art on Paper Conservator. Prior to this, she served for seven years as the Paper Conservator at the Johns Hopkins University Sheridan Libraries and Museums in Baltimore, MD. Originally from Western... Read More →


Tuesday May 30, 2017 2:30pm - 3:00pm
Regency A-B Ballroom Level, West Tower

2:30pm

(Collection Care) Environmental performance assessments of packing cases employed by the J. Paul Getty Museum
The rise in loans of cultural heritage artifacts between institutions has increased their exposure to the transportation environment. Though the duration of travel for a loaned artifact is usually brief and the artifact is buffered from the exterior environment by its packing case, the potential exists for exposure of the artifact to temperature and relative humidity conditions far exceeding the range designated by loan agreements, or episodes of shock and vibration among the greatest encountered in an artifact's lifetime. These environmental conditions may cause physical responses such as material expansion or contraction or impact from an extreme force that can damage an artifact. The Managing Collection Environments (MCE) initiative at the Getty Conservation Institute (GCI) largely focuses on the control and management of collection environments in museums. However, an object's transient period between venues represents an extension of the museum environment and, as such, research into the transportation environment is included in the MCE initiative. Art packing and transportation has previously been an area of study, highlighted by the seminal Art in Transit conference in 1991, and this work has been instrumental in raising the level of packing worldwide. With the continued development of packing techniques and sensor technology, particularly with respect to shock and vibration, it is an opportune time to reassess the performance of packing cases currently in use. Though the majority of museums depend on assistance from outside consultants to pack museum artifacts for transport, large museums typically have experienced preparations staff with access to a range of suitable packing materials. The Preparations department at the J. Paul Getty Museum (JPGM) has earned a reputation for employing high quality cases for the transport of loaned artifacts. They regularly use a double crate packing technique, particularly for three-dimensional pieces and panel paintings. In addition to cushioning foams common in the packing industry, Getty preparators also employ custom-designed Sorbothane rings that protect an artifact by absorbing shock and isolating and dampening vibration. Despite the prominent standing of the JPGM's Preparations department, a systematic assessment of the environmental performance of its cases has been lacking. Working alongside the Preparations team, as well as with the various conservation departments at the JPGM, the GCI's MCE initiative has conducted numerous in situ studies examining temperature, relative humidity, shock, and vibration conditions for a range of packing cases used by the JPGM to transport artifacts. Monitoring multiple packaged artifacts or mockups during the same transit also provided an opportunity to directly compare case performances when subject to identical environmental input conditions. While the bulk of monitoring occurred during ground or air transits, special attention was given to the so-called "first mile/last mile” transitions, as handling of packaged artifacts at either venue or at intermediate junctions is often thought to pose added risk of damage. It is envisioned that this environmental assessment protocol may be applied to assess transport cases used by other cultural heritage institutions, particularly those which are commercially available.

Speaker(s)
avatar for Vincent L. Beltran

Vincent L. Beltran

Assistant Scientist, Getty Conservation Institute
Vincent Beltran joined GCI Science in 2002. He has been an active participant in a range of research projects including the mechanical characterization of historic materials, the effect of reduced oxygen environments on color change, evaluations of packing case performance during... Read More →

Co-Author(s)
avatar for Rita Gomez

Rita Gomez

Lead Preparator, J. Paul Getty Museum
Rita Gomez is a Lead Preparator at the J. Paul Getty Museum. Specializing in packing and crating since 1986, she has developed the packing systems in use at the Getty today. Rita has lent her expertise to many projects including developing packing techniques for Tutankhamen’s Tomb... Read More →
avatar for Kevin Marshall

Kevin Marshall

Head of Preparations, J. Paul Getty Museum
Kevin Marshall is Head of the Preparations Department at the J. Paul Getty Museum. From 1995-2004 Kevin was the Lead Preparator for the pack, move, and installation of the permanent collections at the Getty Center. Between 2005 -2010 he was the Lead Preparator at the renovated Getty... Read More →

Tuesday May 30, 2017 2:30pm - 3:00pm
Plaza Ballroom Lobby Level, East Tower

2:30pm

(Electronic Media) Digital Preservation Actions as Interventive Conservation Treatments at the Smithsonian
At the Smithsonian Institution, stewarding digital assets is an institution-wide concern. The Institution has deployed an enterprise Digital Asset Management System (DAMS) to support this effort. The system supports all units and currently contains over 10 million image, audio, and video assets including event documentation, digital surrogates of collection objects, and component files of accessioned artworks at the Museums. Additionally, the SI DAMS uses a vendor application, bringing with it its own advantages and challenges, functionality that must be taken into account when building out a comprehensive plan for the care of specific artwork component files. The Smithsonian Museums have worked in collaboration with the Smithsonian's Office of the Chief Information Officer DAMS team to build a suite of actions and policies around the care of artwork component files in the system, defined as the DAMS Time-Based Media Art Package, with approved package definitions and workflow checklists used by all of the participating museums. In developing the DAMS TBMA suite of preservation actions, staff members across the Smithsonian consulted the digital preservation guidelines outlined in ISO 16363, A Standard for Trusted Digital Repositories, and the National Digital Stewardship Alliance's Levels of Digital Preservation. The Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden's Conservation Team has developed their internal processes even further, defining the ingest and care of the artwork components in the system as both interventive conservation treatments and ongoing preservation actions, in accordance with the policies and processes for other material artworks. TBMA Package Reports are provided to the Museum biannually in the ongoing management of these file based artwork components. The Hirshhorn has instituted their own policies to incorporate this documentation in the artwork's ongoing condition assessment. DAMS actions are documented in the form of treatment logs in the Hirshhorn's internal systems. As the DAMS Package develops, management of these files is not only being informed by the needs of treatment, but is also influencing how that treatment is documented. In this way, digital preservation and art conservation professionals have built a shared plan drawing from both fields. Crystal Sanchez, Digital Preservation Specialist at SI DAMS, and Briana Feston-Brunet, Variable Media Conservator at the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, will present their work in building a preservation action framework for the care of digital artwork components in the Smithsonian DAMS. This presentation will examine the shared responsibilities in building and executing policies and actions in the framework, will explore the allocation of tasks to manage the defined requirements, and will speak more broadly to the use of an enterprise Digital Asset Management System in the care of these specific artwork component files, in its role as a preservation repository for this select class of assets. It will also provide perspectives on this choice from both the IT System Admin and the Museum Conservator roles, and provide examples from specific artworks in the collection.

Speaker(s)
avatar for Crystal Sanchez

Crystal Sanchez

Video and Digital Preservation Specialist, Smithsonian Institution, OCIO, DAMS
Crystal Sanchez is a media archivist at the Smithsonian Institution on the Digital Asset Management System (DAMS), working to preserve and provide access to digital collections from across the Smithsonian’s diverse Museums, Archives, Libraries, Research Centers, and the Zoo. She... Read More →

Co-Author(s)
avatar for Briana Feston-Brunet

Briana Feston-Brunet

Conservator of Sculpture and Variable Media, Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden
Briana Feston-Brunet is the Variable Media Conservator at the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Smithsonian Institution. She focuses primarily on the conservation of contemporary and time-based media artworks, including audio, video, film, performances, computer and software... Read More →

Tuesday May 30, 2017 2:30pm - 3:00pm
Comiskey Concourse Level, West Tower

2:30pm

(Objects) The Comprehensive Re-Treatment of a Renaissance Terracotta Altarpiece by Benedetto Buglioni
"Adoration of the Shepherds" was sculpted in the Florentine workshop of Benedetto Buglioni sometime around the year 1520 and bears the coats of arms of Alessandra Pazzi and Bartolommeo Buondelmonti. Significant in scale, standing at ten and a half feet tall, the altarpiece was acquired by the Art Institute of Chicago in 1924. In 2006 it was consigned to storage where it languished for the next decade awaiting its inclusion in the newly-designed galleries of Medieval and Renaissance Art which opened in March of 2017. Comprehensive examination in preparation for treatment revealed that in addition to significant damages, misalignments and disfiguring fills to its 46 sculptural ceramic segments, the wooden cradle onto which the segments had been mounted for at least 100 years was unstable, necessitating its complete disassembly and reconstruction. All technical and treatment aspects of the dismantling, reassembly, reintegration and remounting of the altarpiece will be explored at length but several topics will specifically be highlighted. In particular, the timeframe allotted for treatment did not permit the use of standard mounts despite the fact that the weight, cantilevered position and limited surface area of many of the segments demanded additional support beyond an adhesive system. As a result, a novel solution was designed in response to this mandate. Considerable time will also be spent outlining the myriad inherent problems in attempting to display architectural objects such as these in a context so far removed from the original and the inevitable compromises and regrets that accompany the resultant decisions. An ancillary benefit of the wholesale restoration of the "Adoration" was the unprecedented opportunity to study its construction and to reveal the features conferred on it through the processes of both fabrication and previous repair. These features and idiosyncrasies, which are perhaps unique to the Buglioni workshop—a topic little explored in either the conservation or art historical literature—will also be presented. This massive undertaking happily coincided with similar large-scale treatments being performed concurrently at multiple institutions across the country and abroad. In isolation, treatment of the "Adoration" was a monumental achievement, especially considering the scheduling constraints under which it was performed. But when viewed in the context of the broad and prodigious efforts toward similar goals by so many others during the exact same period, the treatment was even more remarkable, constituting a chapter in a unique volume of conservation history, exemplifying the singular benefits of—but also the caution needed in—cross-institutional collaboration and communication.

Speaker(s)
avatar for Rachel C. Sabino-[PA]

Rachel C. Sabino-[PA]

Associate Conservator of Objects, Art Institute of Chicago
RACHEL C. SABINO has been Associate Conservator of Objects at the Art Institute of Chicago since 2011 where, in addition to treatment-related activities, she has been a co-author of the museum's online scholarly catalogue of Roman art. Rachel held previous positions at the National... Read More →


Tuesday May 30, 2017 2:30pm - 3:00pm
Crystal Ballroom B Lobby Level, West Tower

2:30pm

(Paintings + Research & Technical Studies) Re-examining Old Findings and Inferences: The Study of a Magus at a Table by Jan Lievens
Jan Lievens and Rembrandt van Rijn were born just over a year apart, studied with the same master in Amsterdam, and maintained a close artistic relationship in Leiden from 1625 to 1632. Due to the many parallels in their early artistic practices and subject matter, even contemporaries were sometimes uncertain about the attribution of their works. It is perhaps not surprising that the attribution of a Magus at a Table (Upton House, National Trust) has been elusive. Previous attributions included Lievens, Rembrandt, and 'after Lievens.' 

The painting is one of at least six versions of the same composition. In addition to the identity of the artist, the subject matter of painting is also unresolved. Perhaps the most inexplicable element of the picture is the extensive, tree-like foliage above the altar, in what would otherwise be an indoor scene. Despite the presence of pentimenti, the Upton picture was re-attributed to be a copy of a lost work by Lievens (c. 1631-2) after dendrochronology carried out in 1983 suggested a use date of ‘after 1660' (a date stylistically inconsistent with Rembrandt or Lievens). Recently, however, the accuracy of this dating has been questioned; it has been suggested that the painting could be an original work.

In this study, various findings and interpretations from 1983 were re-evaluated in light of recent technical scholarship and advances in analytical techniques. This includes a re-evaluation of dendrochronological data from 1983, with further analysis carried out in 2014 by Ian Tyers. Emerging analytical and imaging technologies like macro x-ray fluorescence scanning (MA-XRF) provided key new insights into the painting's materials, construction, and relationship to the other versions.

Technical examination shed light on the numerous stages of reworking in subject matter and composition. Crucially, MA-XRF (carried out by University of Antwerp) revealed important pentimenti painted in earth, black, and copper-containing pigments, which were previously invisible in x-radiography. This paper will also reflect on how incorrect data given by dendrochronology in 1983 was able to skew the interpretation of many other technical findings. Certain old assumptions and interpretations were thus challenged in light of the new results. Aspects of the painting technique that were previously assumed to be uncharacteristic of Lievens or Rembrandt have been re-assessed in the context of the significant body of technical and historical research published on the artists since the painting was last examined. These findings allowed the Upton picture to be re-attributed as an original painting by Lievens, rather than one of the many copies after a lost work.

Speaker(s)
avatar for Shan Kuang

Shan Kuang

Samuel H. Kress Fellow in Painting Conservation, Conservation Center of the Institute of Fine Arts, New York University
Shan Kuang completed her graduate training in the conservation of easel paintings at the Hamilton Kerr Institute, University of Cambridge in 2015. She received her BSc in Chemistry from Yale University in 2011. She is currently the Samuel H. Kress Fellow at the Conservation Center... Read More →


Tuesday May 30, 2017 2:30pm - 3:00pm
Regency C-D Ballroom Level, West Tower

2:30pm

(Photographic Materials) The Fiocruz Collections: Discussing the Preservation of its Photographic Archives
This talk results from research carried out by the author for her Graduate Certificate in Preservation and Management of the Science and Health Cultural Heritage, at Fundação Oswaldo Cruz – Fiocruz. It discusses the "incorporation” and "disincorporation” of archival documents, proposed by Fiocruz institutional policies: Política de Preservação e Gestão de Acervos Culturais das Ciências e da Saúde and Programa de Incorporação de Acervos. The talk discusses the need of balance between objective and subjective criteria in the assessment of archival documents. It also stresses the importance of the trans-disciplinary research as an alternative to this duality, as well as the significance of the stakeholder to this discussion. This research is now being applied to the evaluation of the state of conservation of a collection of photographic documents that was initially separated to be discarded. After this evaluation, the author will propose a further assessment that considers the institutional guidelines as well as the opinion of the non-conservation technical staff of our institution. 

Speaker(s)
avatar for Nathália Vieira Serrano

Nathália Vieira Serrano

Conservator, Fundação Oswaldo Cruz
Nathália Vieira Serrano has B.A.s from the Federal University of Minas Gerais in Visual Arts (2007) and Conservation and Restoration of Cultural Heritage (2013), the latter of which based on a Final Thesis entitled 'Restoration of a French bookbinding the nineteenth century: theory... Read More →


Tuesday May 30, 2017 2:30pm - 3:00pm
Michigan 1A-B Concourse Level, East Tower

2:30pm

(Textiles) Identification of skins in a Chewa dance garment from Malawi using DNA sequencing
In recent years, the study of material culture has increasingly included techniques based on DNA sequencing.  Information gleaned from the analysis of historic or ancient DNA (hDNA, aDNA) can be used to identify species used in the construction of an object, and in some cases, their geographic region of origin.  The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique enables DNA sequences to be obtained from extremely small samples of biological materials.  Like traditional microscopic examination methods, identification using DNA depends upon the availability of samples for comparison.  However, online searchable databases, such as GenBank, contain many millions of DNA sequences from hundreds of thousands of organisms and grow continue to grow exponentially as new sequences are added.  This paper briefly reviews the development of aDNA research using museum collections in New Zealand and describes the identification of mammal species used in the construction of an African dance garment.  The garment is thought to date from the 19th or early 20th century and was collected in Malawi and donated to the National Museum of New Zealand in the 1930s.  Records describing the garment as being made of monkey tails conflicted with the appearance of the garment, which was marked by a diversity of fur patterning and colouration.  As a garment used for dance and also handled by museum staff over the years, DNA contamination from several sources presented a challenge to properly identifying the mammalian species of interest.  We describe aspects of the method developed to overcome this problem and discuss the results obtained, which indicated that at least six species were used in making the object.  Ethical issues inherent in this type of research, sampling considerations and methods will be discussed.

Speaker(s)
avatar for Anne Peranteau

Anne Peranteau

Textile Conservator, Museum of New Zealand Te Papa
Anne Peranteau is Textile Conservator at the Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa. She received a BS in biochemistry from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and an MS in fine art conservation from the Winterthur University of Delaware Program in Art Conservation in 2004. She has... Read More →


Tuesday May 30, 2017 2:30pm - 3:00pm
Crystal Ballroom C Lobby Level, West Tower

3:00pm

(Architecture + Wooden Artifacts) Treatment of Appleton Organ at the Metropolitan Museum of Art
In 1982, the Department of Musical Instruments at the Metropolitan Museum of Art installed a fifteen-foot, sixteen rank pipe organ. Built in 1830 by the well-known Boston craftsman Thomas Appleton, this organ survived nearly musically unaltered, an unusual fate for such instruments and largely the effect of benign neglect. It is considered to be amongst the finest examples of Appleton's work, in addition to being the earliest known extant organ by him. At the Met, it has served as an important part of the musical instrument collection and has been played semi-regularly since 1982, to the delight of both public and patrons. In February 2016, the Department of Musical Instruments closed its galleries to the public to begin a two-year gallery renovation project. This offered a rare opportunity for museum conservators, alongside an outside restorer, to undertake a substantial evaluation, documentation, and treatment of this important organ. The work undertaken on the organ can be divided into two categories: treatment of the musical mechanism and treatment of the casework. Treatment of the mechanism was critical at this point in time for satisfactory function of the instrument during performance. For the Appleton organ this included pipes, bellows, and windchest and was considered essential work in the scope of this project. Often this type of intervention requires a conservator of musical instruments to collaborate with outside builders and restorers who are expert in dealing with the musical implications of their interventions. Such collaborations are not necessarily straightforward and require time and compromise to obtain the best possible outcome for the instrument. Intervention on the casework, was performed in house by the two musical instruments conservators. The organ casework has suffered the effects of cumulative light damage over the thirty years since installation. The mahogany boards and veneers have faded significantly and the restoration coatings of beeswax had become dull and grey-tinged. Conservation work focused primarily on the development of a two-part coating system which would protect the wood from further light damage and at the same time improve its aesthetic authenticity. It is clear that a treatment begins long before a conservator begins to touch a work of art and, further, that musical instruments bring their own challenges in terms of conservation, use, and display. The environmental challenges of the display location, feasibility and longevity of our interventions, appropriateness of restoration work, monetary and time costs, and role of the instrument within and outside of the institution all needed to be weighed. While time and monetary costs of treatment are always significant factors in the decision-making process, in this case, the consequences of not intervening weighed heavily in the equation. The guarantee of further deterioration, at least in the short-term, a lack of aesthetic authenticity, and loss of public access to a playing organ in a museum collection, coupled with the fact that opportunities for intervention are rare, argued in favor of treatment of mechanism and casework.

Speaker(s)
avatar for Manu Frederickx

Manu Frederickx

Associate Conservator for Musical Instruments, Metropolitan Museum of Art
Manu Frederickx received a master's degree in musical instrument making from the Royal Conservatory in Ghent in 2002. He has worked as an independent maker and restorer of harpsichords and plucked string instruments, and trained in the conservation of wood at the Royal Academy of... Read More →

Co-Author(s)
avatar for Jennifer Schnitker

Jennifer Schnitker

Assistant Conservator, Metropolitan Museum of Art
Jennifer Schnitker is an objects conservator with a specialization in musical instrument conservation. She received her M.Sc. in 2014 from the Winterthur/University of Delaware Program in Art Conservation. Having worked with instrument collections at the Horniman Museum and Gardens... Read More →


Tuesday May 30, 2017 3:00pm - 3:30pm
Crystal Ballroom A Lobby Level, West Tower

3:00pm

(Book & Paper) Removing Oil from Paper: A Collaborative Conservation Challenge
The application of oil-based leather dressing, while once considered a best practice in libraries, has had undesirable long-term consequences for bound materials. At the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in the National Library of Medicine (NLM), a large number of leather-bound volumes had multiple applications of a mixture of neatsfoot oil and lanolin dressings liberally applied. The oils not only absorbed into the leather bindings but also migrated onto the pastedowns, end sheets, and text blocks. The oiling process at NLM was documented by call number, year(s), number of applications, and dressing formula. While investigating treatment options, NLM book conservator, Holly Herro, consulted paintings and objects conservator Scott Nolley for insight on viable options for the removal of oil from artifacts. A paper conservator, Wendy Cowan, joined the collaborative effort to develop a treatment protocol for NLM's oil saturated collections. Together, they investigated the issue and devised an effective method for removal of this oil from the NIH bound paper collection. The protocol developed employs washing with alkaline solutions, followed by alternating applications of petroleum ether and acetone administered over a suction point. Oil components are solubilized by the alternating polarities of the solvents and pulled out of the paper by the suction. The presence of the oil in the paper is thereby greatly reduced. The paper is then washed again with spray applications of alkaline water to remove any remaining water soluble discoloration. This talk will explore further details of the treatment protocol, its development and applications, and the benefits of cross-disciplinary collaboration

Speaker(s)
avatar for Holly Herro-[PA]

Holly Herro-[PA]

Book and Manuscript Conservator, National Institutes of Health, National Library of Medicine
Holly Herro is the Senior Conservator at the National Library of Medicine on the National Institutes of Health campus in Maryland. She has been involved in conservation as a book and manuscripts conservator for over twenty-five years. Ms. Herro is a Professional Associate of the... Read More →

Co-Author(s)
avatar for Wendy Cowan

Wendy Cowan

Conservator of works of art on paper, Co-owner of Richmond Conservators of Works on Paper
Wendy Cowan received an MA in the conservation of fine art, specializing in works of art on paper, from the University of Northumbria at Newcastle England in 1999. In 2001 she received a Fulbright Scholarship to work at the Netherlands Institute of Cultural Heritage and the Teylers... Read More →
avatar for Scott Webster Nolley

Scott Webster Nolley

Chief Conservator, Fine Art Conservation of Virginia
Scott Webster Nolley, a native of Virginia, owns the Richmond based firm of Fine Art Conservation of Virginia. He was educated at The Collegiate Schools and received his undergraduate degree in Art Conservation from Virginia Commonwealth University. In 1996 he earned his Master's... Read More →
avatar for Kristi Wright

Kristi Wright

Book & Paper Conservator, Wright Conservation & Framing
Kristi Wright, principal of Wright Conservation & Framing, is apprentice-trained and has been active in the book and paper conservation field for over a decade. She has a Masters in Library and Information Science as well as a Certificate of graduate study with a focus on preservation... Read More →

Tuesday May 30, 2017 3:00pm - 3:30pm
Regency A-B Ballroom Level, West Tower

3:00pm

(Collection Care) Evaluation of climate control in Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History – energy consumption and risk assessment
Yale's Peabody Museum of Natural History (YPM) has a long tradition of improving the environmental conditions for preserving its collection of more than 13 million objects. However, results are unexpected and far from what the museum hoped for as was shown by an analysis of the current environmental conditions in three museum buildings, built in 1925, 1963 and 2001. Analysis of energy use for climate control showed that the Environmental Studies Center, the most modern Peabody Museum building, is the least energy efficient of the three and one of the least energy efficient building at Yale University. Therefore, YPM decided to reevaluate its current climate control strategy towards a more practical and responsible approach, which takes into account the historic character of the buildings and the high cost of climate control. The assessment of climate related risks to collections was the main element in the transformation process towards a new strategy of climate control. It allowed preservation priorities of the YPM collections to be identified. Finally, guiding principles of climate control were proposed that meet the preservation targets of the museum's vast collections and at the same time reduce energy consumption and lower CO2 emissions.

Speaker(s)
avatar for Lukasz Bratasz

Lukasz Bratasz

Head of Sustainable Conservation Lab, Yale Institute for the Preservation of Cultural Heritage
Lukasz Bratasz graduated in physics from the Jagiellonian University in Krakow, Poland in 1996, and received a PhD in 2002 from the same university. In the same year, he joined the staff of the Jerzy Haber Institute, Polish Academy of Sciences. For many years, he headed the Laboratory... Read More →

Co-Author(s)
RB

Richard Boardman

Operations Manager, Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History
avatar for Susan Butts

Susan Butts

Senior Collections Manager, Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History
avatar for Catherine Sease

Catherine Sease

Senior Conservator, Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History
avatar for Stefan Simon

Stefan Simon

Director of Global Cultural Heritage Initiatives, Yale University
Stefan Simon is Director of Global Cultural Heritage Initiatives at Yale University.Trained as a conservation scientist, Simon earned his Ph.D. in Chemistry from the Ludwig Maximilian University, Munich. He has broad experience in scientific research, specializing in material deterioration... Read More →
NU

Nathan Utrup

Museum Assistant, Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History
avatar for Tim White

Tim White

Director of Collections, Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History

Tuesday May 30, 2017 3:00pm - 3:30pm
Plaza Ballroom Lobby Level, East Tower

3:00pm

(Electronic Media) The Role of Conservation Treatment in a Mass-Digitisation Program
Digitisation programs are frequently aimed at reducing the need for physical access to collection material, with the result that fewer resources are expended on physical preservation. This paper discusses the benefits of a mass-digitisation program where resources are provided for the conservation treatment of collections, in some cases, material that would otherwise not have received attention at this stage, thus reducing the need for more interventive treatment later.

In 2012 the State Library of New South Wales, Australia (SLNSW) was awarded an AU$62.3M state government grant to undertake a 10-year program of mass-digitisation, which aims to create 20 million digital objects.

This year, the Digital Excellence Program is aiming to digitise 1.9 million items from across 33 collections using both onsite and offsite digitisers. Material formats vary widely and include books, manuscript papers, maps and plans, serials, pamphlets, newspapers, photographs and negatives, cassette, reel-to-reel and DAT tapes, film, coins, medals, oil paintings, drawings and watercolours.

Mass-digitisation programs of this scale and with this variety of material formats are not common, so it is exciting to be able to work on this program, devising innovative methods of approaching mass-treatment of SLNSW’s cultural heritage collections. Initial project scoping identified that 22 of the collections require input from Collection Care – over 215,000 pages of treatment and 10,500 artefacts requiring packing for offsite digitisation.

While SLNSW’s Collection Care department is large, only three conservators are allocated to the digitisation program. With such a vast quantity of material, and of varied formats, requiring attention, how does Collection Care design effective preservation approaches to suit available resources of time, space, staff and materials?

Innovative strategies are required to realise a program of this scale. The Collection Care team works as part of a larger digitisation project team, which draws on the expertise of specialists from other departments, such as curators, archivists, librarians and digitisation specialists, as well as the support of project managers and all levels of library management. In this way judicious collection selection is undertaken, taking into account collection condition information, as well as considerations of collection rarity, value and level of use.

Once collections are chosen, the second phase of the project is to determine the resources required. Collection surveys are conducted to determine the extent of stabilisation treatment required in order to image the items, and therefore the required resources of space, time, staff and materials.

In order to handle these mass-treatment programs, the Collection Care team have developed innovative preservation platforms to reduce the extent of interventive treatments. In three brief project case studies, different aspects will be explored, including using cataloguing processes to gather condition information on an audio collection; developing time efficient treatment methods to stabilise large paper-based collections; and the importance of rehousing to improve the long-term preservation of a numismatic collection.

Through the practical design and successful implementation of ethical conservation treatments, SLNSW is prolonging the lifetime of their cultural heritage collections, while simultaneously providing access through mass-digitisation, providing benefits well into the future.

Speaker(s)
avatar for Felicity Corkill, [PA]

Felicity Corkill, [PA]

Senior Conservator, Digitisation, State Library of NSW
Felicity Corkill is the Senior Conservator, Digitisation at the State Library of NSW in Sydney, Australia. She coordinates preservation planning and oversees the conservation treatment of collections for the Library’s mass-digitisation program. She has been a conservator and conservation... Read More →


Tuesday May 30, 2017 3:00pm - 3:30pm
Comiskey Concourse Level, West Tower

3:00pm

(Objects) Truth Versus Beauty: Maintaining visual unity in the treatment of Florentine polychrome terracotta sculpture
Loss compensation in sculpture can pose treatment questions that can be resolved in many different ways. Different genres, materials and surfaces call for different treatment responses, and different pressures may come to bear when the project involves privately owned works. This paper describes the visual compensation issues affecting two sculptures from the Italian Renaissance, a life-sized glazed terracotta of S. Giovanni da Capistrano, and a smaller Plaque with Winged Putto, both by Santi Buglione.  Both were privately owned when originally treated. The S. Giovanni, now in the collection of the Los Angeles County Art Museum, is one of a group of three near life-sized figures of saints by the Florentine sculptor, a relation of the Della Robbia family.  Each of the three figures was conserved in a different studio:  two in the United States, one in Italy, and all are brought together in the current Museum of Fine Arts, Boston exhibition, Della Robbia: Sculpting with Color in Renaissance Florence.  They provide a fascinating window into differences in treatment style, technique, and materials.  The author will discuss his approach to compensation for the Buglione Plaque with Winged Putto, and the S. Giovanni da Capistrano figure, which were severely damaged and suffered a variety of condition issues.  One of the themes is selectivity -- what to treat, and what to leave untreated?  Where and how much to fill and inpaint, and where not to, to allow the original surfaces to speak of their condition and composition? What is damage to be concealed, or minimized, and what is damage to be preserved? How can the conservator avoid overtreatment and the concealment of important signs of age, composition, and inherent vice which contribute to critical patina and signal originality? How can one preserve evidence of the state of technology of the time it was made--the multiplicity of defects in the glaze and underlying original terracotta--while preserving the visual unity and coherence of the work intended by the artist.? By taking the work in stages, making careful selections, and maintaining close communication with the owner/curator, these tensions may be successfully negotiated. The author will present visual evidence and describe the practical treatment methods to illustrate his work, as well as what he would do differently now. 

Speaker(s)
avatar for Anthony Sigel

Anthony Sigel

Conservator, Straus Center for Conservation and Technical Studies
Tony Sigel is conservator of objects and sculpture at the Straus Center for Conservation and Technical Studies, Harvard Art Museums, and is responsible for the treatment of sculpture and three dimensional objects of all materials from pre-history to post-modern. He was trained through... Read More →


Tuesday May 30, 2017 3:00pm - 3:30pm
Crystal Ballroom B Lobby Level, West Tower

3:00pm

(Paintings + Research & Technical Studies) A Confusion of Colors: Yellow and red pigments in the decorative scheme of the tablinum in the House of the Bicentenary at the archaeological site of Herculaneum
The conservation of the architectural surfaces in the tablinum of the House of the Bicentenary at the ancient Roman site of Herculaneum is a collaborative project of the Getty Conservation Institute, the Herculaneum Conservation Project and the Soprintendenza Pompeii. As part of this project, a study was undertaken by a multi-disciplinary team comprised of conservators and conservation scientists to understand the effects of the catastrophic 79 CE eruption of Mt. Vesuivus on the wall paintings at Herculaneum. Due to the eruption, Herculaneum was destroyed as a living city, and yet preserved nearly intact for two millennia, buried under twenty meters of volcanic material. Discovered in 1709, and excavated as an open-air site in the early to mid-twentieth century, Herculaneum preserved a wealth of Roman cultural heritage, including the exquisitely painted walls of the tablinum of the House of the Bicentenary. The decorative scheme of the tablinum is composed of red, yellow and black monochrome backgrounds with decorative borders and floral and architectural elements. In the center of each wall are figurative scenes emulating portable paintings. As a result of the eruption, the wall paintings suffered severe damage and alteration, notably in large swaths of yellow monochrome background converted to red when exposed to the heat generated by hot mud and ash from the volcano. This color shift significantly changed the appearance of the decorative scheme. The objective of this study was to distinguish the fields of original red monochrome background from the fields of red, which had converted from yellow due to heat from the eruption. The methodology followed for the study consisted of preliminary background research, a stylistic study of similar wall painting schemes in the region, and materials analysis to identify original and altered yellows and reds in the tablinum. Based on the background research, conservators and scientists worked together to develop an approach to analyze the monochrome fields of original and altered red paint in the tablinum in order to characterize their pigment compositions and differentiate between them. Portable X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF) was used in situ to map the monochrome backgrounds. Laboratory analysis, using optical and electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and micro-Raman spectroscopy, was conducted on representative samples collected from areas retaining original yellow color; areas thought to be originally red; and areas thought to be originally yellow, now appearing red. These analyses suggested that the paints were not made with pure ochre pigments, but contained admixtures of secondary materials in small amounts, which appeared to be different in the yellow and red fields. This paper will present the results of the research showing that the compositions of the original and altered reds were sufficiently different to be distinguished from one another. The results of the study have contributed to a better understanding of the original decorative scheme of the room, and the implications for conservation and interpretation. Moreover, the methods developed here can be used to better understand Roman painting technology and potentially identify original and converted pigments at other sites in the Vesuvian region.

Speakers are Leslie Rainer and Kiernan Graves; co-authors are Gilberto Artioli, Arlen Heginbotham, Francesca Piqué, and Michele Secco

 

Speaker(s)
avatar for Leslie Rainer, [PA]

Leslie Rainer, [PA]

Wall Paintings Conservator, Senior Project Specialist, Getty Conservation Institute
Leslie Rainer is a wall paintings conservator and senior project specialist at the Getty Conservation Institute. She has been involved in the conservation of wall paintings on projects in the US, France, Italy, West Africa, China, Mexico, Guatemala and Peru. She is currently project... Read More →
avatar for Kiernan Graves

Kiernan Graves

Wall Painting Conservator, Getty Conservation Institute
Kiernan Graves graduated from the Courtauld Institute of Art with a master's degree in the conservation of wall paintings. She spent the first part of her career in private practice working on a range of UNESCO World Heritage Sites. In the United States, her professional collaborations... Read More →

Co-Author(s)
GA

Gilberto Artioli

Professor of Mineralogy and Crystallography, University of Padua and Director of CIRCe, the centre for the investigation of cementitious materials, CIRCe - University of Padua
Gilberto Artioli is Full Professor of Mineralogy and Crystallography at the University of Padua and Director of the CIRCe centre for the investigation of cementitious materials. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Chicago. His interests focus on materials science applied... Read More →
avatar for Arlen Heginbotham

Arlen Heginbotham

Conservator of Decorative Arts and Sculpture, J. Paul Getty Museum
Arlen Heginbotham received his A.B. in East Asian Studies from Stanford University and his M.A. in Art Conservation from Buffalo State College. He is currently Conservator of Decorative Arts and Sculpture at the J. Paul Getty Museum. Arlen’s research interests include the history... Read More →
avatar for Francesca Piqué

Francesca Piqué

Professor and Wall Paintings Conservator, University of Applied Sciences and Arts of Southern Switzerland
Francesca Piqué is a wall paintings conservator trained at the Courtauld Institute of Art. Piqué also holds an undergraduate degree in Chemistry (University of Florence) and a Master's degree in Science for Conservation (University of London). She worked from 1991 to 2004 at the... Read More →
MS

Michele Secco

Assistant Professor at the Department of Civil, Environmental and Architectural Engineering, University of Padua
Michele Secco is Assistant Professor at the Department of Civil, Environmental and Architectural Engineering of the University of Padua. He obtained his Ph.D. in Earth Sciences in 2012. His research focuses on the mineral-petrographic, chemical, microstructural and physical-mechanical... Read More →

Tuesday May 30, 2017 3:00pm - 3:30pm
Regency C-D Ballroom Level, West Tower

3:00pm

(Photographic Materials) Moonlight and Midnight: The evolution of Edward Steichen's 'Moonrise' prints
Known as the quintessential painter-photographer, Edward Steichen combined artistically renowned compositions with an excellence in technique and experimentation. He often created multiple versions of a print in order to test out the subject matter using different combinations of colors and effect. Two gum-platinum prints by Steichen, from his 1904 'Moonrise' series in the collection of the Art Institute of Chicago, illustrate his experimental attitude. Though they appear to have been printed from the same negative, each displays unique characteristics, color palettes, orientations, and titles. Historically, very little was known about the composition or creation of either of these two large-format photographs. To understand the individual elemental and material variations within these prints, and to compare known processes to those described by the artist in a correspondence, X-Ray Fluorescence and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy were performed. Characteristic signals for Prussian blue, platinum, chromium, iron, and lead were detected in both large prints. One of the works also showed clear signs of an applied varnish, which at the time was only traditionally applied to paintings. This paper proposes a tentative timeline for the creation and alteration of the works, based on the results of chemical and visual analysis and art historical research. The understanding of these two mystifying artworks has been significantly expanded due to the material analysis of these objects.

Speaker(s)
avatar for Kaslyne O'Connor

Kaslyne O'Connor

Paper Conservator
Kaslyne O’Connor is paper conservator in private practice. She was previously the Assistant Conservator at the Provincial Archives of Alberta, where she focused on the treatment and rehousing of damaged archival maps, prints, and records. She came to Edmonton directly from Chicago... Read More →

Co-Author(s)
avatar for Sylvie Pénichon, [PA]

Sylvie Pénichon, [PA]

Senior Conservator, Department of Photography, Art Institute of Chicago
Sylvie Pénichon is a senior conservator in the Department of Photography at the Art institute of Chicago. Sylvie has published, lectured, and taught extensively on the conservation and preservation of photographs, in the United States and abroad. She is the author of Twentieth-Century... Read More →
avatar for Ariel Pate

Ariel Pate

Assistant Curator of Photography, Milwaukee Art Museum
Ariel Pate is Assistant Curator of Photography at the Milwaukee Art Museum. Previously, she was a curatorial assistant in the department of photography at the Art Institute of Chicago, where she was responsible for the creation of The Alfred Stieglitz Collection: Photographs site... Read More →

Tuesday May 30, 2017 3:00pm - 3:30pm
Michigan 1A-B Concourse Level, East Tower

3:00pm

(Textiles) The Characterization of ‘Foxing’ on Textiles
‘Foxing,' a term used by paper conservators to describe yellow to brown spotted staining, has long been researched and debated in paper conservation literature and has been attributed to both fungal and metal contaminants in paper. While a visually similar phenomenon is frequently observed on textiles, and the term ‘foxing' has been taken up by textile conservators, it has not as of yet been sufficiently characterized in a textile context. Using survey data gathered from textile conservators around the world, this project first investigates how frequently ‘foxing' is observed in textile collections to determine the magnitude of the problem, and seeks to identify any common factors, properties, and conditions that can be associated with the phenomenon in a textile context. While the plenitude of paper conservation research is a tremendous resource for textile conservators, it remains to be determined what correlations can and cannot be made between ‘foxing' on paper and ‘foxing' on textiles. Rather than endeavor to identify overall causes of ‘foxing' on textiles, the second part of this project explores different characterization methods that offer a better understanding of the active conservation issues present on affected textiles. Techniques often used in the characterization of ‘foxing' include UV fluorescence photography and X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometry. Using a case study of a ‘foxed' textile from the Canadian Conservation Institute study collection, this project compares these established methods to more accessible, affordable, and targeted characterization techniques such as bathophenanthroline strip testing for active iron ions, pH testing, and ATP/AMP bioluminescence testing for the presence of microbiological activity. In shifting the focus from characterization techniques that attempt to identify cause towards those that assess active risk, the paper discusses methods of examination that should promote the development of simplified treatment strategies that target the specific stabilization needs of the textile in addition to those that tackle the aesthetic reduction of stains.

Speaker(s)
avatar for Sophia Zweifel

Sophia Zweifel

Isabel Bader Fellow in Textile Conservation and Research, Agnes Etherington Art Centre, Queen's University
Sophia Zweifel (MAC 2015) holds a BA and MA in Art History from the University of British Columbia and University College London (UCL). Sophia completed the Master of Art Conservation program at Queen’s University, specializing in the conservation of objects. She has performed pre-program... Read More →


Tuesday May 30, 2017 3:00pm - 3:30pm
Crystal Ballroom C Lobby Level, West Tower

3:15pm

(Objects) Conservation of 15th and 16th century Italian Glazed Terracotta
Over the past 15 or so years, Art Conservation Group has worked on more than a dozen glazed Italian terracotta sculptures, many of them from the Della Robbia workshops; some small, several have been life sized. All of these works have come to us after purchase from the open market or auction house; occasionally they are brought to us by dealers. Renaissance-era painted surfaces are altered in appearance by the aging of the paint and varnish layers; however beautiful a painted Madonna and Child remains, it cannot look as it did the day of its creation. The chemistry that takes place over time, not to mention generations of restorative work, renders these surfaces vastly changed. One of the glories of glazed ceramics is that beneath the layers of grime and old restoration, the surfaces are often beautifully preserved. If properly treated, a glazed surface cannot really be over-cleaned; removal of grime and old restoration only further reveals its original surface, its original appearance. Though there are often multiple areas of damage, adjacent surfaces largely inform the viewer as to how the whole would have looked. In essence, it is more of a viable option to strive for ‘an original appearing surface' on a glazed ceramic work than on any other media of the period. However, depending on context, this is not always the best objective; part of the journey of each treatment is deciding on the most appropriate extent of restoration. As a studio in private practice, beyond our mandate to treat each object within the AIC code of ethics, our choices are also directed by the clients' needs or the fact that they are going out to the market. While it is always appropriate to preserve some sense of an object's visual antiquity, we consider the context the piece will be placed when determining our aesthetic goal(s). In some cases we tip the balance more toward preserving a greater proportion of glaze or fabric losses, for example; and in some cases we lean toward carrying out more of a full restoration. The trio of Santi Buglioni's near life size sculptures that were showcased in the 2015 Museum of Fine Arts, Boston exhibition, are a case in point. Aesthetic choices during our treatment Saint Bernardino, differed from Tony Sigel's choices during his conservation of Saint John of Capistrano - a treatment that he will present in a companion talk - and both our choices differed from those of the Uffizi treatment of Saint Francis(?). Our part of a joint presentation with Tony Sigel will discuss our general approach for the treatment of these terracotta sculptures. We will include a review of the general materials that we use and discuss some of our choices in light of our work in the private sector.

Speaker(s)
avatar for Leslie Ransick Gat, [PA]

Leslie Ransick Gat, [PA]

Conservator, Art Conservation Group
Leslie Ransick Gat, President and Principal Objects Conservator at Art Conservation Group, has worked in private practice and for major museums since 1981. Leslie holds a Certificate in Art Conservation and a Masters degree in Art History from New York University Institute of Fine... Read More →

Co-Author(s)
avatar for Erin Toomey, [PA]

Erin Toomey, [PA]

Objects Conservator, Art Conservation Group
Erin Toomey, Senior Managing Conservator at Art Conservation Group, earned a Certificate in Art Conservation and a Masters degree in Art History from New York University Institute of Fine Arts in 2004. Prior to joining Art Conservation Group, Erin worked in the objects conservation... Read More →

Tuesday May 30, 2017 3:15pm - 3:30pm
Crystal Ballroom B Lobby Level, West Tower

3:30pm

Break in the Exhibit Hall
Tuesday May 30, 2017 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Riverside West Exhibit Hall Exhibit Level, East Tower

4:00pm

(Architecture + Wooden Artifacts) Structural Treatment of Wooden Beams
Wooden beams of ceilings in historical buildings in Cairo are suffering from overloads, biodeterioration, and human and environmental deterioration that is causing cracks, deflection, and twisting or broken wooden beams. Study of wooden ceiling conditions in the Ganem Albahlawan mosque in Cairo found a five broken beams and deterioration of wooden panels in the ceiling. A numerical study and specific survey of this case study was made through structural calculation for each wooden beam, and an intervention proposal. Furthermore, an experimental study is presented about use of fiber reinforcement polymers (FRB) to treat broken wooden beams. Three groups of wooden samples were used: small, medium and full-scale sample beams. The samples were evaluated by bending and testing strength, while the experiment study used many methods of treatment, changing the type of FRP or applying different methods to be calculated and suitable for the span, condition, and the load capacity of wooden beams. Results showed the ductility of wooden beams increased, to absorb loads of more ten times than before treatment; this revives the historical wooden beams so they can continue their function.

Speaker(s)
avatar for Mostafa Sherif

Mostafa Sherif

Control Unit Manager, Ministry of Antiquites
I graduated from Faculty of Archaeology at 2001, and I finished my Master's thesis in 2011 in the conservation of wooden ceilings of Historical buildings. I continued my PhD studies in structural conservation of wooden ceilings, which I finished in 2016. I have been working in the... Read More →


Tuesday May 30, 2017 4:00pm - 4:30pm
Crystal Ballroom A Lobby Level, West Tower

4:00pm

(Book & Paper) Treatment 305: A Love Story
Treatment 305 was developed at Princeton University Libraries by conservators Brian Baird and Mick Letourneaux. A paper detailing this binding structure was published in volume 13 of the Book and Paper Group Annual in 1994 and is titled "Treatment 305: A Collections Conservation Approach to Rebinding”. Essentially, a tight joint binding with a natural hollow and minimal spine linings was developed that incorporated all of the positive aspects of bindings from this era with none of the negatives. The Treatment 305 structure provides an incredibly flexible and durable binding that opens very flat and places minimal strains on the book during use. At The Indiana Historical Society, a substantial portion of our printed book collection dates from the late eighteenth through to the mid nineteenth centuries. While many of these books exhibit typical damage, such as detached boards and split spines, there are a fair number of them whose bindings are either non-existent or so degraded that the books need to be rebound. We digitize a fair amount of our collection material and patrons frequently use our books for research, so a flexible, durable binding that incorporated aspects, both aesthetic and structural, of late eighteenth and early nineteenth century bindings was needed. Treatment 305 seemed like a logical solution to this dilemma, especially if a few adjustments could be made to tailor the structure, adhesives, and covering materials to a more special collections approach to rebinding. In this presentation I will detail two treatments I performed using the Treatment 305 structure adapted for special collections materials. The first book treated was a publication of pre-statehood Acts and Laws which no longer retained its original binding. The book was washed, re-sized, re-sewn, and rebound using most of the original Treatment 305 steps detailed in Baird's and Letourneaux's article. The second book treated had a strange "binding on top of a binding” structure which included a total of four boards that had completely failed as a result of previous water damage. This treatment involved much discussion with the curator and a decision was made to construct a binding that used most of the book's oldest elements in order to be sympathetic to its original appearance. The book was washed to remove staining and heavily fragmented printed cover papers were lifted from the original boards, lined, and incorporated onto the new boards. The spine piece was made from a kozo fiber paper and linen laminate and toned to match a fragment of the original leather discovered under a turn-in. The Treatment 305 structure was used for rebinding with a few modifications made to accommodate the incorporation of original elements and this book's smaller size. In both cases, the final bindings resulted in extremely flexible and aesthetically satisfying books that can easily withstand frequent use and potential future digitization on a book scanner. Treatment 305 proved to be an adaptable and expedient solution to the treatment challenges presented by our late eighteenth to mid nineteenth century printed book collection.

Speaker(s)
avatar for Kathy Lechuga, [PA]

Kathy Lechuga, [PA]

Book Conservator, Indiana Historical Society
Kathy Lechuga is currently the Book Conservator at the Indiana Historical Society in Indianapolis and a professional associate of the American Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works. Previously she was the Conservation Lab Manager at the Preservation Lab, a collaborative... Read More →


Tuesday May 30, 2017 4:00pm - 4:30pm
Regency A-B Ballroom Level, West Tower

4:00pm

(Electronic Media) Me and My Kinetta
The current landscape of art conservation faces many challenges when it comes to digitization technologies that are used to render artworks for public display and preservation. Chicago Film Archives (CFA) faced a unique challenge in acclimating the newest instance of the Kinetta Archival Film Scanner into its digitization workflow. I aim to discuss acting as the inaugural user of the machine and its operating software after a previous instance of the scanner was revised by its two-person production team. Acquiring the scanner was a result from CFA's aspirations to expand its means of collection care through digital preservation and access efforts; the urgency of this being solidified after being granted a MacArthur Foundation MACEI award in February of 2016 with the understanding that this aspiration was to be fully underway within the year. Upon receiving the scanner in March of 2016, CFA's small staff was trained on the scanner by its creator at its Chicago-based office. From there, the staff worked to learn the workflow from notes taken during the initial training sessions and remote support from the scanner's creators; no instruction manual was available to consult as CFA offered the first set of regular users to approach the daily workings of the machine and its software. The staff faced regular calibration failures, software crashes, digital artifacts, and breakdowns of physical scanner parts. By learning how to effectively communicate issues through providing focused contexts and details about them, CFA worked with the creators of the Kinetta Archival Film Scanner to correct these recurring issues. Working through the scanner's technological and physical challenges allowed CFA to author an operations manual meant to be both relevant to future Kinetta users, as well as define a new approach to caring for the archive's collections.

Speaker(s)
avatar for Amy Belotti

Amy Belotti

Digital Collections Manager, Chicago Film Archives
Amy Belotti is the Digital Collections Manager for Chicago Film Archives. She holds a BFA in film and an MLIS in Library and Information Science from Pratt Institute. She has previously worked with film and digitized media materials at organizations such as the George Eastman Museum... Read More →


Tuesday May 30, 2017 4:00pm - 4:30pm
Comiskey Concourse Level, West Tower

4:00pm

(Objects) Tempting Fate: Lessons Learned from the Treatment of Giovanni della Robbia's Adam and Eve
Recent examination and conservation treatment of the Walters Art Museum's large scale relief of Adam and Eve (27.219), attributed to the workshop of Giovanni della Robbia circa 1515, has shed new light on the complex history of this object during the 19th and early 20th centuries when it moved least four times among collections in Europe and America. On continuous view at the Walters since 1909, the relief is currently located on a stairway landing in a high-traffic area of the museum, hindering access and photography. In 2013, an unfortunate incident of damage provided the impetus for a year-long effort to examine, document, and treat the relief to provide better records of condition, stabilize loose fragments, and remove dirt, grime, and excess restoration materials. The project was conducted in close collaboration with James A. Murnaghan Curator of Renaissance and Baroque Art Dr. Joaneath Spicer. Examination and treatment were conducted largely in the public, and physical constraints of the landing area prevented the use of solvent extraction equipment. As a result, cleaning methods were restricted to mechanical, aqueous, and low-VOC solvent methods. Frequent interaction with museum visitors, while not originally part of the treatment plan, became a valuable and highly visible form of conservation outreach in the galleries. Loose or detached fragments were consolidated with Paraloid B-72 on days that the museum was closed to visitors. Several loose sections were separated to facilitate removal of corroding iron pins. Removal of overpaint and excess fill materials revealed many sections of glazed terracotta that had long been obscured, including portions of the inscription with gaps and possible transpositions of text. Removal of restoration material from the join edges provided evidence that the relief is partly assembled from fragments and may once have been larger, surviving today in reduced form. Examination of cleaned surfaces and glaze analysis by x-ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRF) provided evidence that many sections of glazed terracotta were manufactured in the 19th century. The pink clay body and layered glaze structure of these newly-made pieces more closely resemble those of painted maiolica than the buff-colored clay body and single, opaque glaze layer characteristic of the della Robbia. Archival research suggests that the current assembly and newly-made sections may have been created in Italy in 1870 or before, possibly with the intent of sale to the South Kensington Museum. Integration of damages, losses, and 19th -century terracotta sections was undertaken in consultation with Dr. Spicer. Ultimately, the decision was made to tone losses and prior restorations with only minimal additional filling or resurfacing of prior fills. As a result, the appearance of the relief is unified at a distance, but damages, restorations, and differences between the two types of terracotta are visible on close inspection. The treatment of the Adam and Eve has thus revealed it as a complex hybrid object, combining 16th-century fragments with previously unrecognized 19th-century restorations. Additional research on 19th-century restorations in glazed terracotta is recommended, as little information on the subject is available.

Speaker(s)
avatar for Gregory Bailey, [PA]

Gregory Bailey, [PA]

Booth Family Rome Prize Recipient, American Academy in Rome
Gregory Bailey received an M.A. in Art Conservation from Buffalo State College in 2011. He is currently the recipient of the Booth Family Rome Prize in Historic Preservation and Conservation at the American Academy in Rome, researching the craft origins of Venetian enamels on copper... Read More →


Tuesday May 30, 2017 4:00pm - 4:30pm
Crystal Ballroom B Lobby Level, West Tower

4:00pm

(Paintings + Research & Technical Studies) A Preliminary Investigation into Aquazol® as an Alternative Lining Adhesive for Paintings
Lining has existed for hundreds of years through its early uses in artist studios to present iterations within conservation. Many paintings suffer from sensitives to heat or moisture- two key hazards of current lining adhesives and methodologies. This paper, as part of a collaborative pilot study, explores Aquazol™, (poly-2-ethyl-2-oxazoline or PEOX), as a novel lining adhesive. As a tertiary amide polymer, it features a neutral pH, solubility in a variety of organic solvents, and no discolouration upon aging. Key physical characteristics include high strength and flexibility in shear tests, as well as an easily altered flow rate and glass transition temperature of 69-71°C. Additionally, PEOX is non-toxic. All of these characteristics suggest possible viability as an adhesive for lining paintings on canvas. Aquazol™ 500 was tested on two traditional substrates of de-crimped linen, as well as polyester sailcloth and set using both heat set and cold lining methods. The addition of natural thickening agents such as agarose and xanthan gum decreased wicking into canvas and provided added strength. Through 180° T-peel and shear testing in Northumbria University (Newcastle Upon Tyne, UK) mechanical engineering department, quantitative results match qualitative experience of increased lining adhesive bond strength and flexibility. Further examination under magnification indicates a nap bond and, after reversal through force, minimal adhesive residues remain on the original object verso. The initial results with Aquazol500™ as a lining adhesive are positive and offer much hope for further research. Significant additional testing into effects of aging, climate, and the addition of biological media are necessary before recommendation as an alternative lining adhesive.

Speaker(s)
avatar for Blair Bailey

Blair Bailey

Selby Painting Conservation Fellow, John & Mable Ringling Museum of Art
Currently the Selby Painting Conservation Fellow at the John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art. Recent MA graduate in paintings conservation from Northumbria University. Experiences including treatment of Western mural and easel paintings, as well as treatment of paper based, archaeological... Read More →

Co-Author(s)
avatar for Raymond Aso

Raymond Aso

Master of Science Graduate Student in Mechanical Engineering, Northumbria University
RC

Richard Campbell

Master of Science Graduate Student in Mechanical Engineering, Northumbria University
BD

Ben Dawson

Master of Science Graduate Student in Mechanical Engineering, Northumbria University
avatar for Nicola Grimaldi

Nicola Grimaldi

Senior Lecturer in the Conservation of Fine Art, Northumbria University
After graduating in 1993 from Northumbria University with a Master of Arts Degree in the Conservation of Fine Art Nicola Grimaldi spent many years working in private practice. Clients have included many Regional and National Museums and Galleries, organisations such as National Trust... Read More →
KM

Kallum Moses

Master of Science Graduate Student in Mechanical Engineering, Northumbria University
DR

Dr. Roger Penlington

Teaching Fellow-Mechanical & Construction Engineering, Northumbria University
avatar for Dr. Charis Theodorakopoulos

Dr. Charis Theodorakopoulos

Senior Lecturer in Conservation Science, Northumbria University
Prior to joining Northumbria in 2013, Charis taught conservation of works of art and conservation science as Associate Scientist, at the Technological Educational Institute of Athens, Greece (2007-2013). Prior to that he was a Research Assistant and Research Fellow at the University... Read More →

Tuesday May 30, 2017 4:00pm - 4:30pm
Regency C-D Ballroom Level, West Tower

4:00pm

(Photographic Materials) New Original – Reprint in Fine Art Photography
Historically, the status of a photograph as an 'original object' has been controversial in the field of fine art due to the nature of the negative/positive process itself. In other words, there can be multiple original objects. In recent years, 'reprints' have emerged much more frequently in the world of fine art photography. This complicates the notion of the original and challenges conservators, curators, galleries, collectors, artist's estates, and contemporary artists to define the "original” object in photography. Some reprints are not printed on the same photographic paper, nor even with the same process as the original object. Yet, the movement of creating "reprints" seems to be gathering momentum and is likely to continue into the future. We will certainly come across more of these prints being put forward as "new” originals. This paper will discuss some of the issues and questions surrounding "reprints" in fine art photography from the conservator's perspective as of 2017. Further discussion will be centered around examples of reprinted objects, the reasons why reprints were made, who authorized the reprints, the need for identification and labeling, the value of reprints versus originals, the possible impact reprints have on understanding original prints and artist works, and what is an original print in photography.

Speaker(s)
HM

Hanako Murata, [PA]

Conservator of Photographs, The Better Image
Hanako Murata Murata is Photograph Conservator at The Better Image® since 2015 after working as an Assistant Conservator at the Museum of Modern Art and the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City. She holds her Master of Arts (MA) in the Conservation of Works of Art on Paper... Read More →

Co-Author(s)
avatar for J. Luca Ackerman

J. Luca Ackerman

Assistant Conservator, The Better Image®
J. Luca Ackerman studied photography at the Rhode Island School of Design, Massachusetts College of Art and earned a Bachelors degree from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. Luca joined the staff at The Better Image® after graduating from FAMU in Prague, Czech Republic... Read More →
avatar for Tatiana Cole-[PA]

Tatiana Cole-[PA]

Conservator of Photographs, Private Practice
Tatiana Cole is a conservator in private practice in the Boston/New England area, and previously held the position of Associate Conservator of Photographs at The Better Image, New York City. Tatiana Cole has practiced preservation and conservation of artistic and historic works since... Read More →
avatar for Peter Mustardo

Peter Mustardo

Director, The Better Image®
Peter Mustardo graduated from Columbia University's Advanced Certificate Program in Preservation Administration. He was the Assistant Conservator at the International Museum of Photography at George Eastman House from 1978 to 1982, Head of the Preservation Section at the New York... Read More →

Tuesday May 30, 2017 4:00pm - 4:30pm
Michigan 1A-B Concourse Level, East Tower

4:00pm

(Textiles) Oh, Bother: The Conservation of Winnie the Pooh and Friends
This paper will describe the conservation of the five original Winnie-the-Pooh stuffed animals, namely Pooh, Kanga, Eeyore, Tigger, and Piglet, upon which A. A. Milne's classic children's stories are based. The stuffed animals were purchased by Milne at various points in the 1920s as gifts for his son, Christopher Robin Milne. In 1956, Milne donated the animals to his U.S. publisher, E.P. Dutton & Co., where they remained until 1987, when they were donated to the New York Public Library. Although they underwent a conservation campaign when first acquired by the library, thirty years had taken its toll and it was decided that the animals were one again in need of conservation. After thorough examination at the library, they were sent to the Textile Conservation Workshop for treatment. The condition of the animals varied greatly, from Tigger, who was merely lopsided, to Eeyore, who required over a hundred hours of work. Aside from the 1987 conservation campaign, all of the animals had been thoroughly mended and repaired sometime before being acquired by the library. Many of these previous repairs, involving patching and darning, had faded to colors drastically different from the original plush. Brown piglet now had a sage green blotch over 3/4 of his head, and gray Kanga and Eeyore were covered with numerous beige spots. The library feared that this made the animals appear uncared for, and distracted from their historical and illustrative importance. However, it was unclear when exactly these repairs had been made. Were they undertaken in the Milne household because Christopher Robin had loved them too dearly? Or had they been added while under the care of the publisher, who may have thought they were looking shabby after many rounds of traveling tours? A photo from the 1950s indicated that at least some of the patches on Eeyore had been added after this date, but the rest were dated largely on speculation, informed by quality of repair and materials used. Although much of the charm of children's stuffed animals comes from the generations of hand-sewn patches, a large part of these animals' importance is their resemblance to the original illustrations. Therefore, it was ultimately decided that where they could not be mediated with overlays, all truly disfiguring patches would be removed and replaced, whether or not they were believed to have been added by the Milnes. Custom mounts, designed in conjunction with a fabricator, helped to mediate defects in posture while offering inconspicuous support. The end result was animals that more closely resembled those immortalized in Milne's classic books, making the connection between literary and object history more accessible to children and adults alike.

Speaker(s)
avatar for Alison Castaneda

Alison Castaneda

Kress Fellow in Conservation, The Textile Museum
Alison Castaneda holds a M.A. in Fashion and Textile Studies from the Fashion Institute of Technology. She is an associate member of the American Institute of Conservation and is the author of multiple posters and presentations, involving synthetic leather, an Islamic talismanic shirt... Read More →


Tuesday May 30, 2017 4:00pm - 4:30pm
Crystal Ballroom C Lobby Level, West Tower

4:15pm

(Collection Care) Panel Discussion: A Review and Comparison of Anoxic Treatment Methods for Pest Management
It has been over ten years since Shin Maekawa and Kerstin Elert published The Use of Oxygen-Free Environments in the Control of Museum Insect Pests (Getty Conservation Institute, 2003), which detailed the assembly and use of a nitrogen-based system for anoxia. Although conservators and scientists continued to develop new methods, materials, and technologies for anoxic treatments in the past decade, little of this information has been published. Each of the five panel speakers has been involved with the development and/or use of a different type of anoxic treatment setup at their institution or private practice. Variables for each of these systems range in the inert gas used, technical details of gas delivery, treatment time involved, materials associated with setup, and costs associated with assembly and maintenance. After a short introduction by the moderator, each panelist will briefly present his or her anoxic system. Presentations will focus on the practical details, pros, and cons associated with each system's assembly, use, and cost. A moderated discussion period will follow, where systems will be compared, potential future research needs will be discussed, and possible avenues for publication and dissemination of the information presented will be examined. The authors propose an hour for this panel overall; 30 minutes for presentations and 30 minutes for discussion. Speakers: Rachael Perkins Arenstein (Conservator, A.M. Art Conservation, LLC) will speak on the use of oxygen scavengers. William Donnelly (Conservation Assistant, Winterthur Museum, Garden & Library) will speak on the use of a CO2-based system. Arlen Heginbotham (Conservator of Decorative Arts & Sculpture, The J. Paul Getty Museum) will speak on the history of anoxic treatment at the Getty and recent modifications to a nitrogen-based system. Bret Headley (Owner and Principal Conservator, Headley Conservation Services, LLC) will speak on the development and use of a nitrogen-based system. Eric Breitung (Research Scientist, The Metropolitan Museum of Art) will speak on the development and use of an argon-based system.

Speaker(s)
avatar for Eric Breitung

Eric Breitung

Research Scientist, Department of Scientific Research, The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Eric Breitung, Research Scientist, specializes in modern preservation materials and museum environment issues in the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Department of Scientific Research. His work includes the development of advanced analytical test methods for assessing commercial materials... Read More →
avatar for Laura Mina-[PA]

Laura Mina-[PA]

Head of Textile Conservation, Winterthur Museum/University of Delaware
Laura Mina received her MA in fashion and textile studies from the Fashion Institute of Technology, and her BS in performance studies from Northwestern University.
avatar for Elena Torok

Elena Torok

Assistant Objects Conservator, Dallas Museum of Art
Elena Torok is the Assistant Objects Conservator at the Dallas Museum of Art (DMA), where she works on the treatment, research, and long-term care of the collection. She earned her M.S. from the Winterthur/University of Delaware Program in Art Conservation in 2013 with concentrations... Read More →


Tuesday May 30, 2017 4:15pm - 5:15pm
Plaza Ballroom Lobby Level, East Tower

4:30pm

(Architecture + Wooden Artifacts) Exposing Graffiti in George Washington’s Cupola
Frequent visitation to George Washington's Mount Vernon home has been a common occurrence since the 18th century, and sometimes, those visitors left a permanent memory. "Exposing Graffiti in Washington's Cupola” is about uncovering the signatures of guests visiting Mount Vernon during the 19th century and specifically leaving their mark in the iconic cupola. This paper will explore a change in an approach to treatment of the wood window architraves in the cupola that was initially designed to completely remove the existing coating, but was then modified to conserve specific layers of paint containing names, dates, and locations in pencil. Discussion will also cover varied techniques utilized for the pre and post treatment documentation of the architectural elements, including digital photography, measured drawings, computer generated modeling, and multi-spectral imaging. Lastly, the long-term maintenance and utilization of the architraves will address the plan for extending the life while displaying this unique piece of architectural history at Mount Vernon.

Speaker(s)
avatar for Steven Stuckey

Steven Stuckey

Architectural Conservator, George Washington's Mount Vernon Estate
Steven Stuckey is the Architectural Conservator at George Washington’s Mount Vernon Estate. His education has included a mix of formal and informal experiences, including two graduate degrees (one in historic preservation from Eastern Michigan University and the other in history... Read More →


Tuesday May 30, 2017 4:30pm - 5:00pm
Crystal Ballroom A Lobby Level, West Tower

4:30pm

(Book & Paper) Medium Rare: An Innovative Treatment Approach to the Space between Special and General Collections
Faced with a dwindling amount of general collection items in need of repair, in February 2016, the conservation staff at the University of Illinois Library began implementing a new treatment workflow, titled "Medium Rare Conservation”. The motivations for this new workflow were clear; in addition making the best use of the skills and newly available time of the staff technicians, this "in-between workflow” could potentially allow Conservation to serve collections more widely by making treatment available to objects that would otherwise be difficult to prioritize given competing needs and limitations. Furthermore, we hoped it would give us a chance to address a long-existing need in Library and Archives Conservation—namely, how do we treat items that have exceptional material, historical, or condition characteristics that make them complicated to categorize beyond their collection designation? In a University system with 24 million collection items, over 25 subject libraries, and only four full time conservators and technicians, the Medium Rare workflow provided an exciting opportunity for a small conservation staff to work together to have a wide reach. As we began the development of the new workflow, similarities with existing workflows emerged. Several aspects of Special Collection Conservation carried over as important logistical and ethical considerations for the new workflow, including transportation procedures, documentation methods, and frequent communication with collection managers. However, we also saw the need to streamline certain elements of the conservation treatment process to save time and build efficiency, much like our general collection repair practices. This was accomplished by adding a new, short-form documentation interface to our existing database, and truncating our photo-documentation process. It also meant making hard, but clear and firm decisions on what had be excluded from the workflow, such as any item that required the use of chemical solvents or the integration or specialized working of leather or parchment. Now, as we continue to develop Medium Rare Conservation, we are beginning to observe other benefits. Our already strong working relationships with collection managers have been augmented with close communication and a quicker turnaround of treated items. Additionally, our capable technicians are now utilizing their skills on expanded treatment opportunities rather than being limited to the batch work of general collections. Conservators can continue to focus on items that need a higher level of care and attention while also simultaneously supervising the treatment of collection items identified as Medium Rare. Slowly but surely, we are also beginning to see a rise in the number of collections served. With a deep discussion of the goals, the parameters, the benefits and, of course, the challenges involved in creating and implementing a new conservation treatment workflow, this presentation aims to offer a possible model for other institutions who face similar issues within their collections. Moreover, we also desire to solicit feedback in order to continue to grow and improve what we hope will be a successful addition to our preservation program, and ultimately, an excellent way to magnify our scope and impact on the library collections in our care.

Speaker(s)
avatar for Quinn Morgan Ferris

Quinn Morgan Ferris

Senior Conservator for Special Collections, University of Illinois
Quinn Morgan Ferris is the Senior Conservator for Special Collections at the University of Illinois Library at Urbana-Champaign, where she started as the Rare Book Conservator in 2016. Quinn's current position at the U of I includes conservation treatment and planning for Special... Read More →


Tuesday May 30, 2017 4:30pm - 5:00pm
Regency A-B Ballroom Level, West Tower

4:30pm

(Objects) The gap between ethics and aesthetics in Italian restoration: experience in the laboratories of the Opificio delle Pietre Dure in Florence especially on della Robbia works
That of the gap (the loss of materials and colors) is perhaps the most debated argument in the philosophy of restoration to this day. Although the numerous theories on filling the gap were sometimes contradictory, all of them are still current and applicable. How do we deal with the gap in Europe and especially in Italy? How much of it do we fill? Does the restoration have to be recognizable, should I hide the pictorial retouch or should it stand out? Is there a common criterion that is applicable to all types of support? In other words, does ethics or aesthetics prevail? The essay examines some exemplary cases of restoration of polychrome sculptures, including della Robbia works, inside the restoration laboratories of the Opificio delle Pietre Dure in Florence. We analyze the criteria regarding the reconstruction of the gap in modeled works, including the use of 3D scanning technique, and the pictorial retouch in the color gap. We analize also what we call the "dual gap”, i.e. the copresence of both the modeling gap and the pictorial gap, which opens the way for a new philosophical debate between ethics and aesthetics of restoration.

Speaker(s)
avatar for Laura Speranza

Laura Speranza

Funzionario storico dell'arte, Opificio delle Pietre Dure
Graduated and specialized in Art history in Florence University, I'm employer of the Italian Ministery of Cultural Heritage as Director of the Department of Conservation of Terracotta and Wooden Sculpture at the Opificio delle Pietre Dure in Florence. I directed several restorations... Read More →

Co-Author(s)
avatar for Shirin Afra

Shirin Afra

Objects Conservator, Private Practice
I'm an objects conservator, specializing in terracotta. I graduated from the Higher School for Conservation and Restoration of the Italian National Institute of Conservation of Florence, the Opificio delle Pietre Dure. I work in private practice and part of my work is in collaboration... Read More →

Tuesday May 30, 2017 4:30pm - 5:00pm
Crystal Ballroom B Lobby Level, West Tower

4:30pm

(Paintings + Research & Technical Studies) Gecko-inspired µ-Dusters for Cleaning: Ongoing Research and Potential for Art Conservation
The presentation will report on the status of the ongoing research project on the use of µ-dusters in art conservation. Inspired by gecko adhesion, fibrillar microstructures (µ-dusters) show great potential as a dry cleaning material for removing particulate contaminants (loosely referred to as dust) from surfaces vulnerable to mechanical damage from dry cleaning, such as acrylic paintings and daguerreotypes. In collaboration with the Department of Chemical & Environmental Engineering at Yale University, we have demonstrated successful dust removal from a variety of solid surfaces using polymeric µ-dusters. When they touch a contaminated surface, µ-dusters of controlled interfacial and geometrical properties develop intimate contact with both surface contaminants and substrates. However, development of stronger interactions with the contaminants allow for their removal from the surface. Further, preliminary testing on poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) thin films (as model substrates for acrylic paint) demonstrated that by moving the adsorbed particles from the tip to the side of the fibrils and consequently removing them from the contact interface, polymeric µ-dusters are less likely to result in abrasive action on the surface than solid flat dry cleaning materials. This new generation of dry cleaning materials is attractive for use in art conservation for this non-destructive quality as well as for the very low potential of residue deposition on the artwork's surface. While the method is primarily targeted at removing loosely bound contaminants such as dust, µ-dusters present an advantage over with traditional dusting methods, such as brushing or air flow in that they have been shown to remove sub-micrometric contaminants that are not able to be removed by these methods. Colorimetry and gloss measurements and photomicrographs will be taken of artificially soiled acrylic paint samples before and after soiling and cleaning. The results will be compared to existing dusting and dry cleaning methods. The micropillar cleaning material will be also evaluated based on user experience. Suggested areas of further investigation will be presented.

Speaker(s)
avatar for Cynthia Schwarz

Cynthia Schwarz

Associate Conservator of Paintings, Yale University Art Gallery
Cynthia Schwarz is the Associate Conservator of Paintings at the Yale University Art Gallery. Her research interests include the structural treatment of canvas paintings, the conservation of 19th- and 20th-century American murals, and how advances in microbiology can aid in materials... Read More →

Co-Author(s)
avatar for Hadi Izadi

Hadi Izadi

Postdoctoral Associate, Department of Chemical & Environmental Engineering, Yale University
avatar for Kyle Vanderlick

Kyle Vanderlick

Dean and Thomas E. Golden, Jr. Professor, Department of Chemical & Environmental Engineering, Yale University

Tuesday May 30, 2017 4:30pm - 5:00pm
Regency C-D Ballroom Level, West Tower

4:30pm

(Photographic Materials) The Re-creation and Conservation of Megalethoscope Slides
The rarity of Megalethoscope slides and their viewers provided us with a conservation challenge: How does a conservator treat an object when there is a lack of contemporary or historic information? Does one consult a photograph conservator or objects conservator to conserve an albumen print mounted onto a curved wooden frame? What type of collaboration is needed for this project? These are the questions that arose when the North Hampton (NH) Historic Commission brought in a collection of fourteen Megalethoscope slides to the Northeast Document Conservation Center (NEDCC) to be evaluated and examined in early 2014. The paper addresses the questions above and provides a multifaceted approach to the conservation and understanding of these lesser-known photographic materials by 1) re-creating a Megalethoscope slide 2) adapting new techniques from other specialties such as mending procedures used for Japanese panel screens and 3) creating fills and inpainting for viewing in transmitted and reflected light. The re-creation of the Megalethoscope slide was undertaken with Mark Osterman, Photographic Process Historian at the George Eastman Museum (GEM) in Rochester, NY with funding from FAIC Individual Professional Development Scholarship Award. There were no period instructions on making mounted Megalethoscope slides. As a result, this two-day tutorial was primary research into the construction of these unique objects. Mending techniques used on Japanese panel screens were learned from colleagues with in NEDCC's Asian art conservation department and adapted to stabilize tears in the paper supports and dust covers of the slides. Aesthetic reintegration was carried out in transmitted and reflected lighting conditions. The multi-faceted system, re-creating a slide, adapting new techniques and aesthetic work carried out in different lighting conditions provided the basis for the conservation treatment of these slides. This paper represents a significant contribution to an area of conservation that has very little existing literature. The recreation and conservation treatment of these slides provides a better understanding of these objects and, in turn, their future preservation and conservation.

Speaker(s)
avatar for Monique C. Fischer-[Fellow]

Monique C. Fischer-[Fellow]

Senior Photograph Conservator, Northeast Document Conservation Center
Monique C. Fischer is the senior photograph conservator at the Northeast Document Conservation Center (NEDCC) in Andover, MA.  She holds a master’s degree in art conservation from the University of Delaware/Winterthur Museum, and a bachelor’s degree in chemistry from Smith College... Read More →


Tuesday May 30, 2017 4:30pm - 5:00pm
Michigan 1A-B Concourse Level, East Tower

4:30pm

(Textiles) Making the Mold: A Use for Fosshape in Upholstery Conservation
This paper describes an inventive technique to create replacement chair back upholstery using Fosshape. Fosshape, a non-woven polyester that can be manipulated into rigid three-dimensional shapes with the application of heat, has been gaining in popularity for the construction of custom mannequins, but the treatment of a suite of Hepplewhite-style furniture, c. 1790, from Schuyler Mansion State Historic Site prompted investigation into the material's potential in upholstery conservation. This suite, consisting of eight upholstered shield-back armchairs and coordinating sofa, has been on view in the "best parlor” of Schuyler Mansion since the house was opened to the public in 1917. In preparation for the upcoming centennial anniversary, a full treatment of the furniture was desired as the show cover and upholstery profiles were incorrect. Challenged by the compound curves of the frame and the need for two conservators to create eight consistent and correct replacement backs, a method for casting Fosshape over a custom mold was developed. The resulting lightweight and self-contained upholstery cake can be minimally attached to the frame and easily removed. This paper will review the development of the technique, evaluate the success of the method, and offer considerations for future applications of Fosshape in upholstery conservation.

Speaker(s)
avatar for Kirsten Schoonmaker

Kirsten Schoonmaker

Assistant Conservator, Shelburne Museum
Kirsten Schoonmaker is currently the assistant textile conservator at the Shelburne Museum. She received her training through the MA program in Fashion and Textile Studies: History, Theory and Museum Practice at the Fashion Institute of Technology and completed a Samuel H. Kress Conservation... Read More →

Co-Author(s)
avatar for Abby Zoldowski

Abby Zoldowski

Textile and Frame Conservator, NY State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation
Abby Zoldowski, Textile and Frame Conservator for New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation, Bureau of Historic Sites, came to Peebles Island in 2002 as an intern to help with a tapestry project. She has since found her true passion, Upholstery Conservation... Read More →

Tuesday May 30, 2017 4:30pm - 5:00pm
Crystal Ballroom C Lobby Level, West Tower

4:30pm

(Electronic Media) 20th Anniversary of EMG Panel
2017 marks the 20th anniversary of The Electronic Media Group at AIC. We would like to celebrate this milestone by taking stock of the past 20 years and celebrating the evolution of the field.

Peter Oleksik (MoMA) will chair a panel with Jill Sterret (SFMoMA), Paul Messier (Paul Messier Lens Media Lab, Yale), Glenn Wharton (NYU), Crystal Sanchez (EMG Committee Chair) and Christine Frohnert (EMG Committee Chair 2008-2011) about their experiences in this field, from its inception to the present. Which were the defining events in the last 20 years? What is striking when looking back to 1997, 2007, 2017? How has the field and the EMG developed over this time? Where should we be heading next?

Moderator(s)
avatar for Peter Oleksik

Peter Oleksik

Associate Media Conservator, Museum of Modern Art
Peter Oleksik is an Assistant Media Conservator at The Museum of Modern Art in New York. He holds an MA in Moving Image Archiving and Preservation (MIAP) from New York University, where he is currently an Adjunct Professor teaching video preservation. His past work includes the access... Read More →

Speaker(s)
avatar for Paul Messier, [PA]

Paul Messier, [PA]

Head, Lens Media Lab, Yale
Paul Messier is the head of the Lens Media Lab at Yale University's Institute for the Preservation of Cultural Heritage. the LML is devoted to materials-based research on the 20th century photographic print.
avatar for Christine Frohnert

Christine Frohnert

Conservator of Modern Materials and Media, Bek & Frohnert LLC, Conservation of Contemporary Art
Christine Frohnert (Graduate degree 2003, Conservation of Modern Materials and Media, University of Arts, Berne, Switzerland) is partner of Bek & Frohnert LLC, Conservation of Contemporary Art, based in New York City since 2012. Previously, Ms. Frohnert served for twelve years as... Read More →
avatar for Crystal Sanchez

Crystal Sanchez

Video and Digital Preservation Specialist, Smithsonian Institution, OCIO, DAMS
Crystal Sanchez is a media archivist at the Smithsonian Institution on the Digital Asset Management System (DAMS), working to preserve and provide access to digital collections from across the Smithsonian’s diverse Museums, Archives, Libraries, Research Centers, and the Zoo. She... Read More →
avatar for Jill Sterrett

Jill Sterrett

Head of Conservation and Collections, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art
Jill Sterrett has been the Director of Collections at the San Francisco Museum of Modern since 2001. In this role, she oversees five allied departments in a museum structure that is designed to foster working sites of collaboration serving the museum’s programs and its collection... Read More →
avatar for Glenn Wharton

Glenn Wharton

Professor/Educator, New York University, Museum Studies
Glenn Wharton is a Clinical Professor in Museum Studies at New York University. He is the co-director of the Artist Archives Initiative at NYU, a project designed to disseminate knowledge about the work of contemporary artists. From 2007-2013 Glenn served as Media Conservator at the... Read More →


Tuesday May 30, 2017 4:30pm - 5:30pm
Comiskey Concourse Level, West Tower

5:00pm

(Architecture + Wooden Artifacts) Open Discussion
Moderator(s)
avatar for Andrew Fearon-[PA]

Andrew Fearon-[PA]

Chief Architectural Conservator, Materials Conservation
Since 1995, Andrew Fearon has worked in the field of conservation encompassing architecture, decorative arts, and archaeological materials. In 2006 he joined the Philadelphia based firm Materials Conservation where he currently serves as Chief Architectural Conservator specializing... Read More →

Tuesday May 30, 2017 5:00pm - 5:30pm
Crystal Ballroom A Lobby Level, West Tower

5:00pm

(Book & Paper) Line up, Back to Back: Restoration of Korean Buddhist Sutra in accordion book format
East Asian Buddhist Sutras are sometimes mounted in accordion book format and are commonly seen in China, Japan and Korea. Sutra text is written mostly in gold or silver on indigo dyed paper. The indigo papers were either brush or vat dyed, lined with layers of paper, and then joined together as needed. A long, horizontal section of indigo paper was folded into narrow pages, and wooden or paper covers were attached to the ends. A Korean Buddhist sutra, Dirghagama Sutra, in ten-leaf accordion book format with both top and bottom paper covers was brought in for treatment to the Asian Conservation lab at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. Many of the condition problems of this sutra were likely linked to the its function as a personal religious item. For example, damage and losses due to excessive handling, an embossed circular impression likely from a vessel of some sort, substantial dirt and soiling, unknown attachments, crude repairs (tape)…etc. Major treatment involving the dissembly and re-mounting of the sutra had to be considered in order to stabilize the sutra and permit its safe display. This paper presents the examination, documentation and treatment of a Korean Buddhist Sutra. Treatment included surface cleaning, structural stabilization, disassembling, tape removal, infilling, lining and mounting. Conservators overcame several challenges such as: unifying the size of pages, infilling the missing section of the folding areas, combining the front and back with folding lines aligned. During the course of treatment, several interesting discoveries were made involving the interior structure of the sutra, as well as the materials used to create the object. It is hoped this case will be useful for the future conservation of other similar sutras mounted in accordion book format.

Speaker(s)
avatar for Hsin-Chen Tsai

Hsin-Chen Tsai

Conservator, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston
Hsin-Chen Tsai is currently an Associate Conservator in the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston’s Asian Conservation Studio. In 2008, she received an M.A. in Conservation from Tainan National University of Arts (TNNUA) in Taiwan, where she specialized in Asian paintings. Her previous experience... Read More →

Co-Author(s)
avatar for Tanya Uyeda

Tanya Uyeda

Associate Conservator, Japanese Paintings, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston
Tanya Uyeda is the Associate Conservator for Japanese paintings at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston where she has worked for 18 years. She holds an M.A. in Conservation of Cultural Properties from the Tokyo University of the Arts and trained at the Handa Kyuseido Studio in Tokyo... Read More →

Tuesday May 30, 2017 5:00pm - 5:30pm
Regency A-B Ballroom Level, West Tower

5:00pm

(Objects) The Treatment of Two Terracotta Architectural Reliefs by Andrea della Robbia at The Metropolitan Museum of Art
The Metropolitan Museum of Art has among its extensive collection of Renaissance-period glazed terracotta, two masterpieces by Andrea della Robbia (1435-1523) that have recently undergone major conservation treatment. The lunette of Saint Michael the Archangel, which sustained extensive damage after a tragic fall in 2008, returned to The Met's galleries in 2015 after years of meticulous reconstruction, filling, and inpainting of losses, with results that are only visible at close range. More recently, a large tondo with a central representation of the cardinal virtue Prudence was treated in preparation for the current exhibition Della Robbia: Sculpting with Color in Renaissance Florence, returning the piece to public view after being kept in storage for more than a generation. While daunting, the treatment of the Saint Michael lunette was relatively straightforward, but culminated in the creation of an elegant mounting system designed and fabricated by The Met's preparators. The new mounting system was designed to secure each of the sculpture's original 12 interlocking sections independently while allowing the relief to be seen clearly as a whole. In addition to a review of this mount, some discussion of visual choices regarding the separation between the sections will be included in this presentation. The massive tondo of Prudence, composed of 15 molded and modelled sections comprising a central tondo surrounded by a colorful garland, was found to be structurally unstable in its 150-year-old mount, as well as having many aesthetic issues due to previous restoration campaigns. Conservators disassembled the sections with the goal of remounting this large work in preparation for travel. Following disassembly, the sections could be more carefully examined, and the surfaces were cleaned revealing a previously unknown numbering system. This discovery led to fruitful collaboration between conservators and curators to determine the final and dramatically different arrangement of the tondo's garland. To prepare Prudence for travel, an innovative mounting system was developed and fabricated by the conservators. Inspired by the mounting system created for Saint Michael the Archangel but modified for the more massive tondo, an aluminum honeycomb backing panel combined with carbon fiber clips allowed the tondo to travel safely and be displayed in the galleries. Details about the Prudence tondo's disassembly process, the rearrangement of the garland sections, as well as the fabrication of the carbon fiber clips will be highlighted in this talk.

Speaker(s)
avatar for Carolyn Riccardelli-[Fellow]

Carolyn Riccardelli-[Fellow]

Conservator, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Department of Objects Conservation
Carolyn Riccardelli is a conservator in the Objects Conservation Department at The Metropolitan Museum of Art where she is responsible for structural issues related to large-scale objects. From 2005-2014 her primary project was Tullio Lombardo’s Adam for which she was the principal... Read More →

Co-Author(s)
avatar for Wendy Walker

Wendy Walker

Conservator, The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Wendy Walker specializes in the conservation of ceramics and has a special interest in the technology of pottery. After conservation training at West Dean College in England, she worked at the British Museum and Victoria & Albert Museum and as site conservator on several excavations... Read More →

Tuesday May 30, 2017 5:00pm - 5:30pm
Crystal Ballroom B Lobby Level, West Tower

5:00pm

(Paintings + Research & Technical Studies) Pioneering Solutions for Treating Water Stains on Acrylic Paintings: Case Study Composition, 1963 by Justin Knowles
This collaborative case study outlines the criteria leading to the treatment of disfiguring water stains on a large-scale, acrylic dispersion canvas painting: Composition, 1963, by the British artist Justin Knowles. Decision making factors include how the ‘negative space' of the exposed acrylic-sized canvas impacted the understanding and interpretation of the work and thus influenced the treatment methodology. Investigations into the artist's practice provided an important context for a conservation treatment, which prompted an exploration into the use of agar gel as a delivery system for aqueous cleaning solutions.
Composition is a brightly colored hard-line geometric abstraction juxtaposed against an unpigmented acrylic dispersion-sized canvas. Accidental water damage produced tidal stains across the canvas, rendering it unexhibitable. In 1973 Knowles lost more than one hundred of his paintings in a studio fire, driving him into a twenty-six-year hiatus from painting. Very few of these early developmental works by this prominent contributor to the British Abstract Art movement survive, and therefore this was a significant opportunity to conserve this rare painting.
Determining the most appropriate conservation treatment was complicated by both a lack of research into the treatment of water stained canvases, and the presence of an unpigmented acrylic dispersion-size layer. Investigation into the relationship between materials and meaning in Knowles' work, along with the cleaning of acrylic paintings, textiles, and works on paper aided in the development of a tailored cleaning solution to minimise risks to original materials whilst also facilitating the reduction of the stain.
The painting materials were characterized using microscopy, IR, and UV fluorescence, FTIR spectroscopy and XRF analysis. FTIR spectroscopy confirmed the presence of a p(EA/MMA) acrylic dispersion copolymer medium in both the paint and the unpigmented size. From these investigations, six water-stained test canvases were created, light aged for two years under museum conditions[i] , and then naturally aged for one year in dark storage. These samples were used to assess the effects of twenty-two aqueous cleaning solutions, applied both in solution and through agar gel. The results were evaluated using colour measurement[ii] and through visual observations by four paintings conservators. The effect of the preparation of the agar gel and the way it was applied were evaluated through a series of studies. Potential changes to the sized canvas surface were investigated using optical microscopy, Hirox 3-D digital microscopy[iii], highlight-based RTI, Atomic Force Microscopy, SEM, and FTIR-ATR spectroscopy. The results showed changes in surface morphology, which supported the need for designing optimal methods for both the preparation and application of the cleaning systems.
The painting treatment proceeded successfully to the point where the stain was substantially reduced. Retouching was the final stage of treatment aiming to reintegrate treated areas with the original surface, focusing on matching color, texture and gloss. A number of retouching media commonly used on acrylic paint were evaluated, and a successful method was found with Aquazol 50. As a result of this applied, collaborative research, a unique and important work has been successfully returned to displayable condition.
___________________________________________ 
[i] Conditions in the light box were at ~ 28°C and 22% RH. UV was filtered out from the light bulbs. Assuming reciprocity of exposure at 200 lux for 10 hours a day for 730 days (2 years) with an average lux in light box of 7,980 lux resulted in 183 hours exposure in the light box. 
[ii] A MinoltaÔ CM-2600d spectrophotometer using CIE Lab DE*ab colorspace was used to make colorimeter measurements. The results of the colorimeter readings were evaluated in tandem with the conservator's subjective observations concerning change in colour and gloss for each test.
[iii] Hirox 3D digital microscope images were taken at Tate, London, 2016. 

Speaker(s)
avatar for Maureen Cross

Maureen Cross

Lecturer, Courtauld Institute of Art
Maureen is a lecturer in the Conservation & Technology Department at The Courtauld Institute of Art, London. She was appointed in 2005. She worked as a professional conservator at the National Museums of Liverpool, Manchester City Art Galleries and Tate before undertaking her current... Read More →

Co-Author(s)
avatar for Maggie Barkovic

Maggie Barkovic

Assistant Paintings Conservator, Williamstown Art Conservation Center
Maggie Barkovic graduated in July from The Courtauld Institute of Art in London with a Postgraduate Diploma in the Conservation of Easel Paintings. Originally from Virginia, she earned both a BA in Chemistry at Virginia Polytechnic Institute (2008) and an MA in Art History (2012... Read More →
avatar for Olympia Diamond

Olympia Diamond

Assistant Paintings Conservator, National Museums Liverpool
Olympia Diamond is the Assistant Paintings Conservator at the National Museums Liverpool, UK. Currently, she is undertaking an Art Fund supported project for the full conservation treatment and technical investigation of the Bartolomé Esteban Murillo (1617–1682) altarpiece, Virgin... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Bronwyn Ormsby

Dr. Bronwyn Ormsby

Principal Conservation Scientist, Tate
Dr Bronwyn Ormsby is Principal Conservation Scientist at Tate. She manages the Conservation Science and Preventive Conservation department and leads Tate's contribution to the Nanorestart project.

Tuesday May 30, 2017 5:00pm - 5:30pm
Regency C-D Ballroom Level, West Tower

5:00pm

(Textiles) From the Top Down: Dressing the Historic Bed—Developing Mounting Systems from a 21st- century Conservation Perspective
This paper describes custom mounting systems created for historic bed hangings belonging to two New England institutions: the Woodlawn Museum, Ellsworth, Maine, and Old York Historical Society, York, Maine. Each institution had a primary goal to safely display recently conserved bed hangings within an institutional context—one in a historic house setting and the other in a modern gallery setting. The 1827 "Best Bed” at the Woodlawn Museum's Black House features an original bedstead with dimity and silk-fringe-trimmed hangings, displayed in the bedroom for which they were made. Because the bed hangings remained relatively untouched for 200 years prior to this conservation campaign, they offer scholars rare insight into the original methods of tacking hangings onto lathe and posts. In contrast, Old York's famous wool and linen crewel-embroidered bed hangings worked by Mary Swett Bulman between 1735 and 1745, have been removed from their historic setting and are no longer associated with the original bedstead. The textiles have been on and off display in a museum setting since 1908, using various hanging methods, including tacking, applied Velcro, and a modern looping system. The two case studies compare the criteria that guided curators in making their decisions regarding the conservation and dressing of each bed. The paper focuses on the relative technical concepts, auxiliary materials and hands-on procedures that evolved during the process of preparing these two rare and intact full sets of bed hangings for display. Preserving the current condition of each set by meeting strict requirements for vertical support and environmental protection was paramount during the conservation process. Conservation treatment applications are described as related to long-term display. In both projects, methods of supporting and securing the hangings were developed using a combination of magnetic and supportive stitched extensions, as well as some full fabric supports. Each project offered specific structural challenges relative to the bedstead and lathe supports. The primary mandate for the Woodlawn bed was to preserve evidence of all previous tacking campaigns by developing a mounting system to secure the textiles on an auxiliary frame support without intervention or mechanical fastening onto the original structure. The Old York project allowed a variation on the original mounting design using fabric and magnetic supports that were incorporated onto a modern bedstead, produced based on a period prototype. One critical criterion that guided the use of a magnetic mounting system was its flexibility to allow quick removal of the bed hangings in the case of an emergency. Each case study describes techniques used to achieve an effortless upholstered appearance of each set with minimal intervention and simplicity of assembly. From the perspective of the conservator, the mounting system design offers ease of handling for the dressing and undressing of the beds. Both projects offered unique opportunities to initiate a contemporary methodology for mounting historic bed hangings, with results that synchronized both conservation and curatorial goals.

Speaker(s)
avatar for Deirdre Windsor

Deirdre Windsor

Conservator, Windsor Conservation
Deirdre Windsor is an independent textile conservator, Principal of Windsor Conservation in Dover, Massachusetts where she has worked on the conservation of textiles and fashion arts since 2002. She was formerly the Director and Chief Conservator of the Textile Conservation Center... Read More →


Tuesday May 30, 2017 5:00pm - 5:30pm
Crystal Ballroom C Lobby Level, West Tower

5:30pm

(Objects) Open Round Table Discussion
Moderator(s)
avatar for Ariel O'Connor-[PA]

Ariel O'Connor-[PA]

Objects Conservator, Smithsonian American Art Museum
Ariel O'Connor is an Objects Conservator at the Smithsonian American Art Museum's Lunder Conservation Center in Washington, DC. Prior to joining SAAM in 2016, Ariel worked at the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum, Walters Art Museum, Harvard Art Museums, and the Metropolitan... Read More →
avatar for Anthony Sigel

Anthony Sigel

Conservator, Straus Center for Conservation and Technical Studies
Tony Sigel is conservator of objects and sculpture at the Straus Center for Conservation and Technical Studies, Harvard Art Museums, and is responsible for the treatment of sculpture and three dimensional objects of all materials from pre-history to post-modern. He was trained through... Read More →

Tuesday May 30, 2017 5:30pm - 6:00pm
Crystal Ballroom B Lobby Level, West Tower

5:30pm

Health & Safety Committee Meet and Greet
Enjoy coffee and cookies and meet AIC's H&S Committee!

Tuesday May 30, 2017 5:30pm - 6:30pm
Wrigley Concourse Level, West Tower

5:30pm

Pre-Opening Reception Gallery Viewing at the Art Institute of Chicago
Extend your tme at one of the world's best museums. We will have some galleries at the Art Institute of Chicago open for our private viewing from 5:30 pm to 6:30 pm. Sessions end at 5:30 pm, so beat the crowds and head to the Art Institute of Chicago early. Buses will depart from the Crystal Foyer and will shuttle continuously between the Hyatt and the Art Institute.

     


Tuesday May 30, 2017 5:30pm - 6:30pm
Art Institute of Chicago 111 S Michigan Ave, Chicago, IL 60603

6:30pm

Opening Reception at the Art Institute of Chicago
Join us for a fun-filled evening of great art, food, and friends. Many of the museum galleries will be open for private viewing. This is included with all full registration and May 30 one-dayregistrations. A limited number of tickets are available for spouse and guests.  Buses will shuttle between the Hyatt Regency and the Art Institute. However, it is also a nice walk. Opening Reception sponsorship provided by Huntington T. Block Insurance Agency, Inc. and generous in-kind sponsorship provided the Art Institute of Chicago.

 Buses will depart from the Crystal Foyer and will shuttle continuously between the Hyatt and the Art Institute.

Sponsors
avatar for Huntington T. Block Insurance Agency

Huntington T. Block Insurance Agency

The American Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works (AIC) and Huntington T. Block Insurance Agency, Inc. (HTB) have partnered to provide AIC’s members with customized insurance programs. HTB’s specialized fine art policy for conservators protects artwork while... Read More →



Tuesday May 30, 2017 6:30pm - 9:30pm
Art Institute of Chicago 111 S Michigan Ave, Chicago, IL 60603
 
Wednesday, May 31
 

7:30am

(Book & Paper) Business Meeting with a Light Breakfast
The business meeting will begin at 7:30 am, but breakfast will be available starting at 7:15 am. Please feel free to join us then! 

Moderator(s)
avatar for Whitney Baker-[PA]

Whitney Baker-[PA]

Head of Conservation, University of Kansas Libraries
Whitney Baker is Head of Conservation Services at the University of Kansas Libraries, where she has worked since 2002. Since 2004 she has taught the preventive conservation class in the graduate program in Museum Studies at the University of Kansas. She holds an MLIS and Advanced... Read More →
avatar for Mary Oey

Mary Oey

Head of Conservation and Collections Care, New York Public Library
Mary Oey is the Head of Conservation and Collections Care at the New York Public Library. From 2010-2018, she was with the Library of Congress Conservation Division and prior to that, served as the Lake Conservator for Houghton Library at Harvard University's Weissman Preservation... Read More →

Wednesday May 31, 2017 7:30am - 8:30am
Regency A-B Ballroom Level, West Tower

7:30am

(Objects) Business Meeting with a Light Breakfast
Moderator(s)
avatar for Laura Lipcsei-[PA]

Laura Lipcsei-[PA]

Senior Conservator of Ceramics, Stone and Glass, Royal Ontario Museum
Laura Lipcsei is a Senior Conservator at the Royal Ontario Museum (ROM) in Toronto. Prior to the ROM, Laura worked at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston and the Metropolitan Museum of Art, NYC. She holds a Master of Arts in Conservation from Queen’s University where she also earned... Read More →

Wednesday May 31, 2017 7:30am - 8:30am
Crystal Ballroom B Lobby Level, West Tower

8:00am

(Electronic Media) Business Meeting with a Light Breakfast
Moderator(s)
avatar for Crystal Sanchez

Crystal Sanchez

Video and Digital Preservation Specialist, Smithsonian Institution, OCIO, DAMS
Crystal Sanchez is a media archivist at the Smithsonian Institution on the Digital Asset Management System (DAMS), working to preserve and provide access to digital collections from across the Smithsonian’s diverse Museums, Archives, Libraries, Research Centers, and the Zoo. She... Read More →

Wednesday May 31, 2017 8:00am - 9:00am
Comiskey Concourse Level, West Tower

8:00am

(Textiles) Business Meeting with a Light Breakfast
Moderator(s)
avatar for Kathy Francis-[PA]

Kathy Francis-[PA]

Textile Conservator, Francis Textile Conservation, LLC
Francis Textile Conservation LLC specializes in the preservation of historic and artistic textiles. Owner and Conservator, Kathy Francis, has over 30 years experience in textile conservation including 15 years in private practice, 8 years as Textile Conservator at the Isabella Stewart... Read More →

Wednesday May 31, 2017 8:00am - 9:00am
Crystal Ballroom C Lobby Level, West Tower

8:30am

(Objects) To B-72 or Not To B-72? Alternative Adhesives for Archaeological Ceramics
Choosing an appropriate adhesive is one of the fundamental decisions that must be made in archaeological conservation, particularly in pottery reconstruction. The practical considerations hold implications for the treating conservator and others who will care for the material for generations to follow. As conservators gather their kits to head out to excavations across the globe each year there are often recurring queries to colleagues and listservs on alternatives to Paraloid B-72. This presentation will examine the variables that go into adhesive choices for archaeological ceramics with a focus on the hot climates of the Mediterranean and the Middle East. Results from an online survey documenting the current practices of archaeological conservation colleagues will be shared. In 2005 The Israel Antiquities Authority (IAA) began to examine its protocols for ceramic reconstruction. With limited resources and scientific capabilities at the time they collaborated with the Italian Istituto Centrale per Il Restauro (ICR) to review adhesives and reconstruction techniques used in the lab. Mowital B60HH (polyvinyl butyral resin) was determined to be the most appropriate adhesive for their treatment needs. This collaboration and the scientific process employed will be shared as a case study. A survey of historical ceramic treatments used by IAA will demonstrate the importance of a periodic review of adhesive choices. The differences in adhesive choices for field versus lab use will also be discussed. The goal of this presentation is not to recommend any single adhesive, but to examine some alternatives and the variables that inform the choice of adhesive in countries where resources, climate and other challenges may result in answers other than Paraloid B-72.

Speaker(s)
avatar for Rachael Perkins Arenstein-[PA]

Rachael Perkins Arenstein-[PA]

Partner, AM Art Conservation LLC
Rachael Perkins Arenstein is a Professional Associate member of the American Institute for Conservation. She is a principal of A.M. Art Conservation, LLC, the private practice that she co-founded in 2009. She has worked at the Bible Lands Museum Jerusalem, the Smithsonian's National... Read More →

Co-Author(s)
avatar for Elisheva Kamaisky

Elisheva Kamaisky

Head, Pottery Conservation Unit, Israel Antiquities Authority, Israel Antiquities Authority
Elisheva Kamaisky is Senior Conservator and Head of the Pottery Conservation Unit of the Israel Antiquities Authority where she has worked since 1989. Her research interests center on the technology of ancient pottery production and manufacturing, preventive conservation and analytical... Read More →

Wednesday May 31, 2017 8:30am - 8:45am
Crystal Ballroom B Lobby Level, West Tower

8:30am

(Sustainability) With Room to Grow: Design and Construction of a new Conservation Facility at the University of Washington Libraries.
The University of Washington Libraries in Seattle, WA completed construction of a new conservation facility in February 2016. This paper will cover the many challenges encountered as well as the many innovative and practical solutions developed by Libraries staff in collaboration with UW Capital Projects staff, architects and contractors. The new 4,000 sq. ft. facility was built, in part, to support a new endowed conservator position funded in part by an Andrew W. Mellon award. The current lab lacked both the space and the required equipment to support the new position. Previously, three staff members and as many as three students worked together in a 2,000 sq. ft. basement with limited support for complex treatment to meet the Libraries' conservation needs. The new lab would need to incorporate both the current staff, the new conservator, and allow for future capacity and growth. With the growing diversity of collection materials, staff also designed the space to support more complex photograph and paper conservation in the future. The new design therefore had to comfortably house not only existing equipment and furniture, but also new aqueous and chemical treatment apparatus, documentation and examination equipment, and increased storage, workspace and office needs. Location was a primary challenge early in design as HVAC concerns and fume hood installation required that the facility be relocated from its existing basement location. Additionally, designing for current need as well as future capacity while only doubling available square footage required significant experimentation with workflow, storage design, and efficient space use. There were also inherent challenges in communicating the unique needs of a hybrid conservation facility and its staff to architects, facilities staff, laboratory consultants and other stakeholders and collaborators throughout the project. The results of this three-year project will be presented along with discussion of the many communication solutions staff created to address design and fundraising needs. Designing the space for future flexibility and practical material storage, innovative fume-hood design, original designs for laboratory furniture, and sustainable management practices will all be covered. Now fully operational, post-construction project insights and performance will also be shared.

Speaker(s)
avatar for Justin P. Johnson

Justin P. Johnson

Conservator, University of Washington Libraries
Justin Johnson, Senior Conservator at University of Washington Libraries, has been working in conservation professionally for 10 years. He earned an M.A. in Conservation Science from the University of Sussex and West Dean College in Chichester, United Kingdom, and a B.A. from the... Read More →


Wednesday May 31, 2017 8:30am - 8:50am
Plaza Ballroom Lobby Level, East Tower

8:30am

(Architecture) Learning Together from Preventive Conservation: Restoration of the Choir Room of the Convent of Mercedarian Sisters (S XVIII), Lima, Perú
The Convent of the Mercedarian Sisters was built in 1727 within the Historic Centre of Lima. It is one of the convents that form part of the Provincial Archbishop of Lima, where the Cathedral of Lima conducts restoration projects through it technical team. In our experience on convents, the conservation works require a strategy to convince the occupants that their real and personal properties are Cultural Heritage of the Nation. We should articulate the conservation and restoration needs, with their daily life, and explain what they call "conservation measures”. Since our first encounters with religious orders, we have been able to establish a work methodology based on dialogue and interaction, aimed at the conservation of cultural goods. In the case of the Convent of Madres Mercedarias, the Choir of the Convent, a 300-year-old architectonic structure, never intervened before, showed a high level of deterioration, which caused a complex intervention at structural and architectural level, besides the restoration of the Assumption Altarpiece placed in the choir room, which was about to fall too. Although the decision to execute the restoration of the choir room was taken, there were other items we found which needed immediate intervention, such as the paintings with high historic and artistic value (many of them from 17th and 18th centuries) which needed an adequate conservation preventive management. One of the basic considerations for the execution of conservation works with Mercedarian nuns have been the permanent communication and participation, since they have carried out for decades superficial maintenance works, which sometimes were detrimental for the conservation of the items: "shaking”, "washing”, "polish”, "rub”; besides, the construction of buildings with modern materials in several sectors of the convent were detrimental to conservation too. In the daily activities of nuns, we could identify a series of useful preventive conservation activites, and others that had to be changed, as well as the important location of damages: they were able to identify the problems and deterioration levels of the items and cloister's structures. Once the restoration processes finished, the old maintenance techniques were compared with the interventions for architectonic and collection conservation.

Speaker(s)
avatar for Erika Anticona

Erika Anticona

Artistic Property restoration, Museo de Arte Religioso Catedral de Lima
Since more than 16 years ago I have been working in the Restoration and Preservation of Monuments, includes properties and Chattels. My main skill is the conservation of ​​Mural Painting and I then gained knowledge in different areas of the conservation such as Tiles, Stone, Wood... Read More →


Wednesday May 31, 2017 8:30am - 9:00am
Crystal Ballroom A Lobby Level, West Tower

8:30am

(Book & Paper + Research & Technical Studies) - Lessons from a Large-Scale Survey of Parchment Animal Origin and Production Quality
Parchment manuscripts sit at the nexus of digital, biological and physical sciences, history, art, and literature. Can a simple PVC eraser link these together? Traditionally, an eraser is an article of stationery used to remove writing from paper. Yet when combined with biomolecular analysis it can also be a medium to ascertain the animal identity and production quality of medieval manuscripts. The eraser strokes the parchment generating a strong electrostatic charge which lifts the grime from the parchment surface; trapped in the grime are tiny amounts of biomolecules from the parchment itself, small samples yes, but enough to be analysed by modern instruments. Parchment books and documents are the fundamental vehicle for the transmission and preservation of a millennium's worth of written culture. Hence their systematic study (palaeography, codicology and diplomatic) have long been recognized as essential disciplines for many areas of humanistic study. For scientists, however, the parchment record of the past represents an unrecognized and untapped reservoir of genetic and biological information. And because a considerable number of parchment books and documents can be precisely dated and localized--the molecular information derived from them has enormous yet largely unrealized value for the fields of bioarchaeology, paleozoology, anthropology, and historical ecology. Both manuscript studies and biomolecular research are, in a sense, forensic: the former, because the disciplines of palaeography and codicology depend on exacting study of regularities in human production of one class of artefact; the latter, because biomolecular analysis yields the DNA of the animal that provided each individual leaf. However, these disciplines currently stand at opposite ends of the epistemological spectrum. Students of manuscripts and texts have long recognized that the most exacting study of individual artefacts is the necessary foundation of their work, even when they seek larger patterns. Science in contrast is moving towards a new mode of cognition enabled by mechanical information generation techniques. Colloquially known as ‘Big Data', this new approach turns the old hypothetico-deductive model on its head to harvest data and share it across networks so that analysis is done by large teams seeking patterns in the data rather than seeking to corroborate prior hypotheses. With the collaboration of colleagues worldwide who have sent us eraser shavings from parchment we are building up evidence of the exploitation of past animal populations and their distribution in time and space, and are adding a new category of evidence concerning the provenance of unlocalized manuscripts.

Speaker(s)
avatar for Matthew Collins

Matthew Collins

Professor, University of York, BioArCh, Archaeology
Mathew Collins completed a degree in Marine Zoology, then a PhD in Geology before Fellowships in Chemistry and Biochemistry and postdoctoral research in Biogeochemistry. He first lectured in Biogeochemistry (Newcastle) before moving to York in 2003 to establish BioArCh, an interdisciplinary... Read More →


Wednesday May 31, 2017 8:30am - 9:00am
Regency A-B Ballroom Level, West Tower

8:30am

(Paintings) Altered States: Conservation of the Ayala Altarpiece
For the first time since entering the collection of the Art Institute of Chicago (AIC) in 1928, the Ayala Altarpiece has undergone a comprehensive conservation campaign to address both structural and aesthetic issues. Completed in 1396 by an unknown Spanish artist, the monumental artwork is a complete ensemble consisting of the retable (measuring 100 x 264 inches) and frontal (46 x 115 inches). Prior to acquisition by AIC, the retable's appearance had been dramatically altered by extensive overpaint applied in several restoration campaigns to mask paint loss and other damages. A tan-colored overpaint was liberally and unevenly applied over the background covering virtually all the original off-white paint in this area. The effect was a dramatic darkening of the overall tonality of the artwork, a disruption in the harmony of the color palette, and a reduction in the composition's sense of depth. Additional discolored retouchings and an aged varnish further diminished the artwork's appearance. The many challenges of the treatment included removing the tenacious overpaint, filling the extensive paint losses, and judicious inpainting to reintegrate the composition. Logistical issues faced during this large-scale project will be discussed as well, such as the handling of the three components that make up the retable, each weighing roughly 300 pounds, and the installation of the altarpiece in the museum's new The Deering Family Galleries of Medieval and Renaissance Art, Arms, and Armor scheduled to open March 2017. This paper also presents information on the altarpiece's construction and materials as determined by technical examination and scientific analysis. Analysis of the various paint layers confirmed the original paint binder to be egg tempera while the overpaint was found to be oil-based. Of particular interest were the discovery of the widespread use of ultramarine paint throughout the composition and the presence of oxalate-rich surface layers that contributed to the darkening of some paint colors.

Speaker(s)
avatar for Julie Simek, [PA]

Julie Simek, [PA]

Associate Paintings Conservator, Art Institute of Chicago
Julie Simek is an associate paintings conservator at the Art Institute of Chicago. She received a MA in Art Conservation from Buffalo State University, Buffalo, NY in 2001. Prior to working at the Art Institute she was an intern at the Brooklyn Museum of Art, a fellow at Tate, and... Read More →


Wednesday May 31, 2017 8:30am - 9:00am
Regency C Ballroom Level, West Tower

8:30am

(Photographic Materials) Current Trends and Collaborations among Heritage Institutions in Latin America: Results of the APOYOnline 1st Heritage Preservation Regional Conference and Workshop on Photographic Conservation, Fundraising & Advocacy
From August 30 to September 2, 2016, leading preservation professionals representing 15 countries from Latin American, the Caribbean and Spain met in Medellin, Colombia as part of the first-ever international conference organized by APOYOnline – Association for Heritage Preservation of the Americas. Founded in 1989, formerly APOYO, has been deeply committed to strengthening exchange and global professional networks, sharing technical information in conservation across Latin America and the Caribbean region. This conference included 14 papers, 24 posters, special guests lectures on Fundamentals of Leadership and International Alliances in Latin American for heritage preservation professionals, the exhibit of products of preservation, and an APOYO Vision 2020 session to discuss future collaborations and activities. Participants attended a four-day workshop on photograph conservation, fundraising, and advocacy ministered by Debbie Hess Norris. This paper highlights the contents and results of the conference. The presentations showed the current Heritage Preservation trends in Latin America. Several presentations focused on how Preventive Conservation and Risk Assessment activities have now superseded the focus on the conservation treatments of the past. There are several collaborative projects in progress among institutions of the region and critical research shared thanks to the support to APOYOnline. The lack of support and funding from government institutions has not stopped professionals from carrying out massive projects such as packing and moving a large photographic collection, using local materials and a great deal of ingenuity and resolve. The use of social media (APOYOnline Facebook page and Twitter) has increased tremendously, facilitating the exchange of critical research information, upcoming events, funding strategies, new directions on education and training, resulting in the identification of potential areas for collaborative work with AIC members. Professionals, who attended this conference, are very interested in forming alliances with institutions in North America to do joint research projects, hosting North American interns to foster and strengthen professional ties. After the conference, a collaborative agreement between professional of three different countries was formalized to study the use of cleaning gels in murals. APOYOnline received proposals for MOUs from three important heritage institutions in Central and South America to establish training opportunities, professional exchange, research opportunities, and plan the next steps to host the 2nd APOYOnline Meeting in 2018. The participants represented major collections and holdings from cultural institutions from Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Cuba, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Peru, United States, Uruguay, Venezuela and Spain. The meeting was sponsored by important North American and Colombian institutions and foundations, private donors, and vendors of conservation products . The conference received media coverage in Colombia, Dominican Republic, Honduras, and Uruguay in addition to social media sites. The impressive response to the conference reiterates the importance of promoting professional networking and professional development in the Latin American and the Caribbean region. APOYOnline is very proud to be the leader of this initiative

Speaker(s)
avatar for Beatriz Haspo

Beatriz Haspo

Collections Officer / Executive manager, Library of Congress
Beatriz Haspo is a senior conservator specialized in logistics, space management, collections management, and disaster preparedness and response. She has certificates in book, paper and painting conservation from Brazil, United States and Japan. Her major education includes M.A. in... Read More →

Co-Author(s)
avatar for Debbie Hess Norris-[Fellow]

Debbie Hess Norris-[Fellow]

Chair of the Art Conservation Department and Professor of Photograph Conservation, Winterthur/University of Delaware Program in Art Conservation
Debra Hess Norris is Chair of the Art Conservation Department at the University of Delaware, and Professor of Photograph Conservation. She graduated magna cum laude with an interdisciplinary BA degree in chemistry, art history, and studio art (1977) and MS in conservation (1980) from... Read More →
avatar for Amparo Rueda

Amparo Rueda

Preservation Specialist, Founder, APOYOnline

Wednesday May 31, 2017 8:30am - 9:00am
Michigan 1A-B Concourse Level, East Tower

8:30am

(Wooden Artifacts) Count Lamberg’s Roman Table in The Rijksmuseum
In 2016 the Rijksmuseum accessioned a unique Roman baroque table. The coat of arms of Count Leopold Joseph von Lamberg (1654–1706), the ambassador to the Court of St. Peter at the Vatican between 1700 and 1705, is virtually ceremoniously staged above a cartouche with a trophy carried by the convoluted stretcher. The table has exuberantly carved legs with a complex arrangement of overlapping C- and S-scrolls, and supports a green verde antico marble top. It is embellished with accentuating and intricate gilt-bronze mounts in place of the more commonly used raised gesso gilding. Being a unique example for its time, the table is recognizably related to designs by Filippo Passarini from the late 17th century and Carlo Fontana from the early 18th century, while the carcass with its facades of false drawer fronts appears to be more old fashioned. A late 17th century pietre dure silver cabinet made by Filippo Schor, Franz I and Dominikus Steinhart for Palazzo Colonna in Rome provides a further link, as it bears striking resemblances in its carving and applied mounts.

The unusual joinery of the center table very much reflects the work of a sculptor rather than a cabinet-maker, utilizing small tenons and threaded bolts for its joinery. The table is executed in deeply carved pear and is stained to imitate a darker wood. Its somewhat lopsided overall appearance originates in twisted and warped components resulting from the use of timbers for the construction that possibly were not fully seasoned. This has contributed to the overall instability of the center table.

Research into the table's gilt mounts revealed the use of a unique type of copper alloy which differs distinctly from the set alloy standard used in Paris, and which were replicated later in England and Germany. Select mounts that have gone missing seem to have been cast from the original ones.

Based on the joineries geometrical arrangement and a systematical trial series, an optically and structurally more favorable leg-stretcher configuration could be determined. As the table remained somewhat lopsided, various possibilities such as repositioning the bolts versus a replacement with modified hardware were discussed. The implementation of several structural modifications, without compromising original substance, proved crucial to maintain the tables stability and re-establish its proud appearance and optical symmetry.

Speaker(s)
avatar for Jan Dorscheid

Jan Dorscheid

Junior Conservator of Furniture, Rijksmuseum
Jan Dorscheid has been the Junior Conservator of Furniture at the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam since October 2015. Jan studied Conservation and Restoration of Wooden Artefacts at the University of Applied Science in Potsdam, Germany, after a three-year apprenticeship as a cabinetmaker... Read More →

Co-Author(s)
avatar for Arie Pappot

Arie Pappot

Promovendus Metal Conservation, Rijksmuseum Amsterdam
Arie Pappot was trained as a conservator of metals and received his Master degree at the University of Amsterdam in 2011. He worked as a metals conservator at the Rijksmuseum from 2009 to 2013, when he started his PhD which deals with the technological history of copper and its alloys... Read More →

Wednesday May 31, 2017 8:30am - 9:00am
Acapulco Ballroom Level, West Tower

8:45am

(Objects) Structural repair of plaster using polyvinyl butyral adhesive systems
This presentation will focus on the design and use of an adhesive system for the structural repair of plaster sculpture. The parameters influencing adhesive system design and the choice of polyvinyl butyral resins as a consolidant will be explored including methods for dealing with prior adhesive repairs, the issue of plaster's structural strength, controlled reversibility, and planned stress relief. These topics will be illustrated through the presentation of case studies of treatment and retreatment of a variety of plaster sculptures, painted and unpainted, over the course of ten years and executed by several conservators under the author's supervision. The information presented will be applicable to treatments of conservators working with plaster in a variety of formats including hollow cast, solid cast, modeled, and architectural applications.

Speaker(s)
avatar for L. H.(Hugh) Shockey-[PA]

L. H.(Hugh) Shockey-[PA]

Head of Conservation | Objects Conservator, Saint Louis Art Museum
L. H. (Hugh) Shockey Jr. MS, AIC-PA is Head of Conservation and Object Conservator at the Saint Louis Art Museum. Previously he was the objects conservator at the Lunder Conservation Center of the Smithsonian American Art Museum where he performed treatment on electronic media and... Read More →


Wednesday May 31, 2017 8:45am - 9:00am
Crystal Ballroom B Lobby Level, West Tower

8:50am

(Sustainability) “What Do You Mean Telecom Servers and Preservation Don’t Mix?” – Sustainable Preservation Environments and the Building of an Environmental Team
Between 2014 and 2016 the University of Notre Dame Libraries completed a National Endowment for the Humanities Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections Planning Grant to improve and make more sustainable the preservation environment for the University's Rare Book and Special Collections (RBSC) storage area in the basement of Hesburgh Library. Working with an Environmental Team consisting of members from the Hesburgh Library's RBSC, Facilities, and Preservation Department Staffs, the campus Utilities Department, the Office of Sustainability, and the Facilities Design and Operations Department, as well as consultants from the Image Permanence Institute, the University was able to diagnose the cause of sub-optimal preservation conditions, as well as identify opportunities for improved preservation and reduced energy consumption. This talk will briefly describe how the team used documentation and environmental data analysis to better understand the air-handling system for the Rare Book and Special Collections department on the basement and first floors of the Library. In addition to the challenge of managing a preservation environment in the basement and an appropriate work/research environment on the first floor, the team discovered that, as the basement level had been renovated, additional spaces had been added to the RBSC air handler – without the knowledge of RBSC or Preservation. Speakers will describe the solutions implemented to alleviate initial preservation and energy concerns, as well as future plans to maintain a sustainable preservation environment for rare and special collections. Finally, equally as important as the preservation activities, the talk will discuss the difficulties and opportunities presented by working with an interdisciplinary team, from initial relationships and reactions, to the growth in communications and trust, to the present, where preservation advocacy is embraced by the entire team in their variety of roles. The success in building relationships has been so significant, that, to quote one team member – "Honestly, I don't recognize the context I'm working in as far as all of this goes.”  It is our hope that this case study will help to change the playing field – so to speak – for other institutions as it as for Notre Dame.

Speaker(s)
avatar for Jeremy Linden

Jeremy Linden

Principal/Owner, Linden Preservation Services
Jeremy Linden has been the Principal/Owner of Linden Preservation Services, Inc., since 2017. He is an active educator and consultant with two decades of experience in the cultural heritage field, the last eight years of which have been focused on enhancing preservation environments... Read More →

Co-Author(s)
LD

Liz Dube-[PA]

Lead Conservator and Head of Analog Preservation, University of Notre Dame Hesburgh Libraries
Liz Dube is Lead Conservator and Head of Analog Preservation for the Hesburgh Libraries, University of Notre Dame.

Wednesday May 31, 2017 8:50am - 9:20am
Plaza Ballroom Lobby Level, East Tower

9:00am

(Architecture) The Perfect Room: The Restoration of the Old Senate Chamber at the Maryland State House, Annapolis Maryland
The Old Senate Chamber of the Maryland State House was the location of nationally significant events in 1783 and 1784. As the temporary home of the Continental Congress, it was here that General George Washington resigned his commission to Congress, thus creating the first modern democracy. It was also in this room where the Treaty of Paris was ratified, officially ending the Revolutionary War. The historic space recently underwent a multi-year, state-of-the-art restoration to return the room as accurately as possible to its 18th-century appearance. Exhaustive physical investigation and meticulous research ensured the authenticity of the richly-ornamented architectural detailing and the furnishings as they would have appeared on December 23, 1783. This paper documents the decision making processes required to adapt the use of historical materials and methods of construction, to matters of budget, schedule, existing conditions and performance. "The Perfect Room" explores the real consequences and the effects of modern systems and technology on a single room preserved through pristine approaches of traditional processes using authentic 18th century materials. Traditional craftsmen, experienced in 18th-century building practices, undertook various aspects of the restoration, including the creation of flat and decorative plasterwork, millwork, flooring, blacksmithing, and painting, using period techniques. Hand-mixed paints, reclaimed flooring of the highest quality, lime plaster, and hand-planed lumber were used on all visible surfaces. From the beginning, the project team aimed for the highest standard of authenticity in the use of traditional materials and historic construction methods. Yet, the reality of restoring such a room in a modern environment meant creating a balance between using modern materials and techniques in the infrastructure and sub-surface areas and maintaining a visibly 18th-century finished space.

This presentation will provide an analysis of the design details for the following project components:

  • Conservation of the central niche.
  • Conservation of the original columns, and columns from an early balcony restoration.
  • Hand-mixed paints and distemper coatings.
  • Installation of edge dowelled floor boards.
  • Millwork. Why it was necessary to glue certain components of the millwork to ensure its stability.
  • Nails. Mild steel was used in the production of handmade nails; wrought iron was not available in the time frame in which the project had to be completed. Nail production also utilized machine stamping of heads in lieu of hand-forging.
  • Furring strips were primed on all sides to ensure stability and long lasting performance. There was no evidence that the original furring strips were coated.
  • Decorative Plaster was precast (rather than run-in-place) with some applied detailing for cost and schedule savings.
  • Flat Plaster on brick masonry walls, the use of rice paper to preserve traces of original 18th century plaster and wire mesh lath to ensure stability of lime plaster over a cracked brick substrate.
  • The reality of using historic materials and techniques within a building with modern mechanical systems, in-use as a functioning government complex.

Speaker(s)
avatar for David C. Overholt

David C. Overholt

Senior Project Manager, The Christman Company
Current Projects: Russell Senate Office Building Exterior Envelope Repair and Restoration, Cannon House Office Building Renewal, Capitol Hill, Washington DC. Evergreen Museum and Library Fire Suppression, Baltimore MD. Union Station Rostral Columns Restoration, Washington DC... Read More →


Wednesday May 31, 2017 9:00am - 9:30am
Crystal Ballroom A Lobby Level, West Tower

9:00am

(Book & Paper + Research & Technical Studies) - The Codex Eyckensis (8th century). Re-evaluation of the 20th century restoration & conservation treatments
The Codex Eyckensis was most probably written at the scriptorium of Echternach (Luxembourg) in the 8th century, and was brought to Aldeneik (northeast Belgium) by Saint Willibrord. This restrained pre-Carolingian codex is a splendid example of the dynamic confluence in the 8th century of the insular formal idiom and the artistic characteristics developing on the European mainland. After the drastic conservation treatment of 1957 with heat sealing plastic foil, the Codex Eyckensis (8th century) was fully conserved in the nineteen-nineties by removing the Mipofolie lamination of the parchment and recreating the missing areas with parchment pulp. Since the conservation was finished in 1992, the manuscript was kept in the crypt of the Saint Catherine's church, a place with a highly instable climate. After 25 year the need for a re-assessment of the Codex Eyckensis urges itself, the more that the possibilities for in depth research have developed considerable. In the ongoing survey, the condition of the parchment and the stability of the leafcasting with parchment pulp is evaluated. Multispectral imaging and material-technical analyses aim to shed light on the condition and the creation of the writing and illuminations of the pre-Carolinian codex. In the new study project (2016-2018), 25 years after, the codex will be re-assessed using non-destructive analytical and imaging techniques. Linking conservation information of the past (1992) with new data, will evaluate protocols applied at the end of the 20th century and contribute to the future preservation of the Codex Eyckensis. During the campaign in the nineteen-nineties, no material technical analyses have been carried out. The combination of XRF, XRF-mapping and Raman spectroscopy are used to characterize the materials and inks used in the Codex Eyckensis. The removed Mipofolie foils have been archived since the treatment in 1992. These foils were highly adhering to the parchment, it was not always possible to remove the PVC foils without removing some small paintfragments. These are analyzed using complementary but destructive analysis techniques aiming at the identification of organic components (binder/colourant). Complementary with the analytical data, imaging will contribute to the condition evaluation and material characterization. Within the framework of RICH (KU Leuven) a multispectral, multi-directional, portable and dome-shaped acquisition system has been developed to imagine with photometric stereo. Visualisation of pigments can be realized based on reflection maps. These findings are evaluated using the data obtained in a laboratory set-up and using the data obtained through XRF, XRF-mapping and Raman. The new assessment and technical study of the Codex Eyckensis is reflecting the complex material and conservation history of the 8th century codex. As the treatment was well documented 25 years ago, the new data are adding multiple layers of information. This research provides new insights into the origin and the creation of the illuminations and contributes to the in depth knowledge of the oldest manuscript kept in the Low Countries. The study gives reflection to the dynamics of conservation history, the importance of ongoing data collecting, revealing new challenges in technical documentation with recent imaging techniques and non-destructive analytical tools.

Speaker(s)
avatar for Lieve Watteeuw

Lieve Watteeuw

Katholieke Universiteit Leuven

Co-Author(s)
MV

Marina Van Bos

Scientific Researcher, Royal Institute for Cultural Heritage
Marina Van Bos, PhD in Chemistry (UGent), is working in the laboratories of the KIK-IRPA since 1991. Her most important research activities are situated in two domains. Within the Leather, paper and parchment laboratory she is responsible for the identification of the different components... Read More →
avatar for Bruno Vandermeulen

Bruno Vandermeulen

Head of Imaging Lab, KU Leuven, University Library
Bruno Vandermeulen holds an MA in Fine Arts, Photography from the LUCA School of Arts, Brussels, Belgium. Since 2002 he is employed at the KU Leuven. He has wide experience in inventarisation and digitization projects in the field of cultural heritage on local, national and international... Read More →

Wednesday May 31, 2017 9:00am - 9:30am
Regency A-B Ballroom Level, West Tower

9:00am

(Electronic Media) Obsolescent Technology: The viability of the cathode ray tube used in art
The cathode ray tube (CRT) is a substantial vacuum tube used to display images in television sets, computers, automated teller machines, video game machines, video cameras, monitors, oscilloscopes and radar. It is composed of one or more electron guns and a phosphorescent screen. Like many other examples of redundant technologies, CRTs have been integral to installation and video art in galleries since the ‘60s. Installations and art that incorporate electronic components are often vulnerable to sustained technological development and other factors outside their physical nature, which accelerate their obsolescence. In fact, the declining production of this particular technology coupled with an increasing inability to source used CRTs has become a concern for institutions and collectors where it is integral to a work of art. While external factors influence the lifespan of a CRT, such devices generally benefit from ratings that estimate the lifespan of the instrument - typically related in number of operational hours - before the CRT becomes unreliable and/or ceases to function entirely. Due to the finite longevity of CRT technology, the need to change certain elements is unavoidable, particularly when the physical form of the CRT is essential to the functioning of many works that rely on those instruments as core components. Today, the role of a conservator encompasses a broader understanding of preservation. Specifically, conservators no longer focus exclusively on the repair of an art object, as they are also concerned with documentation, determining the acceptability of change and managing the changes deemed necessary. Nam June Paik, who transformed video into an artist's medium with his media-based art and understood the impact of technological redundancy/obsolescence, granted the owners of his works permission to make the technical modifications necessary to ensure their continuous operation. In preparation for the loan of "Nam June Paik: Global Visionary" to Smithsonian American Art Museum (December 13, 2012 – August 11, 2013), the conservation department at The Art Institute of Chicago embarked on a conservation project to revive one of the Paik robot assemblages in their collection, Family of Robot: Baby. Prior to the Smithsonian, Baby had not been exhibited since 2000 (at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in the exhibition, "The Worlds of Nam June Paik"). This presentation will focus on the history of CRT replacement in art, the efforts conducted to maintain the CRT technology for Baby's video playback and the viability of this overall approach. It will conclude with a discussion of works by several other artists in which changing the CRT technology for playback or as a sculptural component is impossible, and the implications that will have on those works.

Speaker(s)
SM

Sara Moy

Project Conservator, The Art Institute of Chicago
After graduating from Bennington College with a BA in Visual Arts, Sara Moy earned an MSc in Conservation from University College London Her professional interests focus on preservation methods associated with modern and contemporary objects and installations, as well as material... Read More →

Co-Author(s)
avatar for Raphaele Shirley

Raphaele Shirley

Light artist and composer
RAPHAELE SHIRLEY (Wisconsin, USA). Shirley’s solo exhibitions include: 12.6 Lyrae at the Chimney, New York (2016), 0910 Light Shots, Chelsea Art Museum , New York(2010); Arctic Lights, Dorfman Projects, New York (2010); Jewels of Kvinesdal, Kvinesdal, Norway (2009; Sunken City... Read More →

Wednesday May 31, 2017 9:00am - 9:30am
Comiskey Concourse Level, West Tower

9:00am

(Objects) Carbon fiber fabric and its potential for use in objects conservation
Carbon fiber fabric is a high-performance woven cloth made from carbon filament that is widely known for its applications in the aerospace, auto, marine, and sporting equipment industries. While high-strength carbon fibers became commercially available in the 1960s and more broadly obtainable for consumer use in the 1990s, we have yet to see this versatile material reach its full potential within the field of Objects Conservation. Carbon fiber fabric is designed be used in concert with a resin system to create rigid parts that have a modulus of elasticity comparable to steel. These polymer-reinforced carbon composites are fabricated from layers of carbon fiber cloth laminated together with epoxy. One notable benefit to the conservator is that while laying up the fabric and resin, the material can be made to conform to almost any shape. The cured composite can be quite thin and is as strong as steel but a fraction of the weight. Carbon fiber composites are ideally suited to applications where strength, stiffness, lower weight, and outstanding fatigue characteristics are critical requirements, making them particularly well-suited for fabricating object supports and mounts. This presentation will introduce carbon fiber fabric as a strong, lightweight material that has the potential to replace steel or brass in many conservation mounting applications, and will explore ways that carbon fiber fabric has been used in the Objects Conservation Department at The Metropolitan Museum of Art. The talk will include an overview of the material's history and manufacture as well as provide ideas on how conservators can utilize this versatile material. Details on how to choose materials and methods for working with the material will be featured.

Speaker(s)
avatar for Carolyn Riccardelli-[Fellow]

Carolyn Riccardelli-[Fellow]

Conservator, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Department of Objects Conservation
Carolyn Riccardelli is a conservator in the Objects Conservation Department at The Metropolitan Museum of Art where she is responsible for structural issues related to large-scale objects. From 2005-2014 her primary project was Tullio Lombardo’s Adam for which she was the principal... Read More →


Wednesday May 31, 2017 9:00am - 9:30am
Crystal Ballroom B Lobby Level, West Tower

9:00am

(Paintings) The Monopoli Altarpiece: rediscovery and recovery of a Cretan-Venetian masterpiece
Since 1937, the MFA has owned an enigmatic polyptych from the early fifteenth-century that reflects both Italian and Byzantine artistic traditions. The altarpiece is large and imposing, and would have been an exceedingly costly commission. Yet little is understood about why this unusual combination of a Cretan painting style in an Italian format altarpiece came to be used in such an important commission. Known to be from the Church and Abbey of St Stefano in Monopoli, a town in Apulia on the heel of Italy's boot, little was understood about where the painting was produced and by whom. Relegated to storage since the 1960s as its condition rendered it unfit for display, the monumental seven-panel polyptych became the subject of a major treatment and research project begun in 2014, funded by the Lingos Family Foundation. This is the first ever technical examination of the painting, and the first time it was unframed since 1939. The majority of the treatment has been conducted in the highly popular ‘Conservation in Action' space in the MFA's galleries, and education and outreach has been a key component of the project. Once the examination and treatment commenced it quickly became apparent that the original paint surface was in remarkably good condition. Furthermore, the very high quality of the painting indicated a true master was at work. The greatest treatment challenge came from the formation of calcium oxalate on the paint surface, a poorly understood phenomenon that is not uncommon, but very difficult to treat. Various cleaning methods, both traditional and novel, were explored. Surprisingly, therapy used to treat kidney stones (also comprised of calcium oxalate) may be the most effective and safe treatment method. The technical investigation led to myriad discoveries, largely due to the fact the panels had not been drastically altered during past treatment campaigns. Construction techniques, original tool marks (including on the versi, as the panels have not been thinned) and information about the original frame were all revealed. Telling techniques used for gilding, design and painting indicate a Cretan master was at work, while the construction methods, and materials suggest a Italian workshop, possibly in Venice. Collaboration with various scholars, conservators, and scientists have brought us long way towards understanding this mysterious and monumental work.

Speaker(s)
avatar for Caitlin Breare

Caitlin Breare

Assistant Conservator, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston
Caitlin Breare is currently a graduate intern in paintings conservation at the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, which constitutes the final requirement before graduating from the Institute of Fine Arts, New York University graduate program in conservation and art history. She comes... Read More →


Wednesday May 31, 2017 9:00am - 9:30am
Regency C Ballroom Level, West Tower

9:00am

(Photographic Materials) Preservation of Photography in Cuba as a Historic Memory of its Evolution
As everybody knows, conservation of any kind of collection is a requisite to assure its perdurability in time. However, this is not enough without an integrated management, to allow the socialization of the collection so it becomes part of the shared historic memory. Photography constitutes part of the visual and documental heritage of a country. This specific technique, relevant by its objectivity, historic and cultural values, chronicles the human experience with an expressive and comprehensive message, through the visual record of a cultural identity. The mission of the Photo Archive of the Office of the Historian of Havana (OHCH), founded in 1993, is to protect the graphic memory contained in its collections. Its holdings include more than 180,000 objects, including images and technological devices used to produce those images. They comprise the majority of photographic processes. This extensive archive represents the fact that Cuba was the first country in the Americas where photography was practiced and the first one to commercialize this form of art. This justifies the creation of a center that would become leader in conservation of photographs in the country, studying its evolution since it came to Cuba. The strategic proposal for the center, formulated by the author, is to display photographic collections (resultant image) and the technological devices to obtain them, as they relate each other. The integral management of these collections requires specific studies to obtain, not only a consistent museological proposal, but also develop conservation policies, to formulate a methodology for the conservation treatment of photographic collections and display of the collection.

Speaker(s)
avatar for Gloria Alvarez Frigola

Gloria Alvarez Frigola

Director, Historic Photo Archive, Office of the Historian of Old Havana
Gloria Alvarez Frigola is the Director of the Historic Photo Archive in the Office of the Historian of Old Havana. In 1992, she graduated with a degree in library science and in 2013 recieved a bachelor degree in Historic and Cultural Heritage Preservation and Management. She has... Read More →


Wednesday May 31, 2017 9:00am - 9:30am
Michigan 1A-B Concourse Level, East Tower

9:00am

(Textiles) Tips and Tricks
Wednesday May 31, 2017 9:00am - 9:30am
Crystal Ballroom C Lobby Level, West Tower

9:00am

(Wooden Artifacts) Interpreting Thonet: Treatment of a Gebrüder Thonet Bentwood Rocking Chair
Gebrüder Thonet was an Austrian based furniture manufacturer established in the 19th century. Often credited with the invention of bentwood furniture, the company in fact developed the first mass manufacturing processes for harnessing the unique tensile properties of wood to efficiently produce affordable bentwood furniture. While many reproducible models were originally manufactured by standard molds, missing elements of bentwood furniture can be a challenge to replicate. This paper will focus on the treatment of a Gebrüder Thonet rocking chair and the process employed to create a reproduction of the rocking chair's missing back splat. Technical challenges faced when creating this back splat included the back splat's compound curvature and the fact that the intact joinery of the crest rail, stiles, and lower rail physically locked out the insertion of an intact replacement piece. Research determined that the chair's original back splat was constructed out of veneered ply, and a custom mold was built to form the reproduction piece out of bendable plywood and and beech veneer. In addition to the missing back splat, which served as a major component of the chair's aesthetic continuity and intended function, substantial areas of the finish were stripped and the surface was sanded, leaving newly exposed bare wood visible on nearly half of the chair. Decisions regarding the overall treatment, which were informed by the existing wear on remaining elements of the chair, will also be discussed. Given the degraded and worn appearance of the remaining finish, as well as the damage incurred through partial stripping, the owner was also interested in learning more about the possibility of the presence of original finish. Little is published on the original finishing techniques employed by the Gebrüder Thonet Company, and it was decided that an investigation of the finish on the rocking chair in comparison to the available literature may shed light on the nature of the finish and its potential originality.

Speaker(s)
avatar for Paige L. Schmidt

Paige L. Schmidt

Assistant Objects Conservator, The Mariners' Museum and Park
Paige is the Assistant Object Conservator at the Mariners' Museum and Park in Newport News, VA. She is the 2018 Program Chair for the Wooden Artifacts Group.

Co-Author(s)
avatar for Jiuan Jiuan Chen-[PA]

Jiuan Jiuan Chen-[PA]

Assistant Professor, Buffalo State Program in Art Conservation
Jiuan Jiuan Chen joined the faculty in the Art Conservation Department at SUNY Buffalo State in the Fall of 2012 as the professor for Conservation Imaging, Technical Examination and Documentation. She is a graduate of Class of 2001 from the same program. She previously interned or... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Aaron Shugar

Dr. Aaron Shugar

Professor/Educator, Garman Art Conservation Department State University of New York College at Buffalo
Ph.D., University College London M.S., University of Sheffield B.A., York UniversityAaron N. Shugar joined the Art Conservation Department at SUNY Buffalo State College in January 2006 as a conservation scientist, focusing on inorganic chemistry. Aaron comes to Buffalo State from... Read More →
avatar for Jonathan Thornton-[Fellow]

Jonathan Thornton-[Fellow]

Conservation Professor, Patricia H. and Richard E. Garman Art Conservation Department State University of New York College at Buffalo (SUNY Buffalo State)
Jonathan Thornton has taught objects conservation at the Art Conservation Department since 1980. Following an earlier career as an artist/silversmith, he studied conservation in this department when it was still located in Cooperstown, NY, and received his M. A. and Certificate of... Read More →

Wednesday May 31, 2017 9:00am - 9:30am
Acapulco Ballroom Level, West Tower

9:20am

(Sustainability) Neurons to the task: how to balance resources with ingenuity in innovation
Innovation is the introduction of something new. It is usually referred to as a new method, or device; a novelty. In conservation and restoration, we often link innovation with science and technology. However, this definition may not always be the appropriate one for many conservators around the globe. Innovation often means managing to find the safest approach to an ideal concept within a very tight budget. Concessions are part of daily decisions and it is a great challenge to be faithful to conservation standards. As a Canadian living and working in South America, I came to realize that, although money brings new dimensions to innovation, ingenuity and versatility are essential key factors to conservation. At the Archaeology Laboratory of the National Centre for Conservation and Restoration (CNCR) in Chile juggling with cost, restrictions, and quality is commonplace. The Centre is government funded. Budget varies from year to year (mainly based on annual growth and inflation). It is not a large sum so great ideas have to come at low cost and priorities have to be made. In addition, the CNCR fixes the guidelines for public institutions nationwide where economical and human resources are very limited. This means it is imperative to think in terms of accessibility, reproducibility, and very reasonable cost when proposing a methodology or a design. So, imagination, resourcefulness and reflection must be present in all levels of decisions. Part of creating something better is to change the way we look at things or address a problem. Quantities of pre-Columbian textile fragmentary have accumulated in storage rooms of national institutions for decades. Safer conditions for their manipulation were implemented by means of a simple support. It could finally give access to invaluable information that can be used in future investigations. Homemade components always add a plus to the balance: budgets can be expanded and possibilities widen. Here are a few examples of ingenuity that benefitted from recycling material, converting equipment (so it can do the desired task) or using simple material to create what was needed: * natural fabric is dyed and sewn to make soft tridimensional supports and reinforcement for intervention, storage or display * pieces of Ethafoam are minced and recycled in sealed polyethylene bags for cushioning in the storage of pottery * a standard vacuum cleaner is modified into a micro aspiration device fitted for removal of particles on fragile garments * a sophisticated casing for the transport and storage of mummified bodies is made out of Ethafoam, cardboard, Tyvex, muslin and a clever vent system. Inventiveness may be a better word. Nonetheless, it emerges from the challenge of finding a way to make it work, to create something better that is efficient and respectful in terms of conservation and budget. And it is reality.

Speaker(s)
avatar for Christine Perrier

Christine Perrier

Technical conservator, Laboratory of Archaeology, National Centre for Conservation and Restoration
I am a Canadian living aboard since 1994; I resided in Turkey, Peru and now Chile. I started my professional life as a geologist from the University of Montreal. I obtained a Master’s Degree in Geochemistry from the University of Quebec in Montreal on Holocene environments from... Read More →


Wednesday May 31, 2017 9:20am - 9:40am
Plaza Ballroom Lobby Level, East Tower

9:30am

(Architecture) Research, Encapsulation and Replication of the Original 1844 Trompe l’oeil Apse Mural in the ‘Old Whaler’s Church, Sag Harbor, NY.
The Old Whaler's Church, designed by Minard Lafever, was built in the Egyptian Revival style in 1844 with an ornate Greek Revival interior. Due to financial constraints, the curved apse was replaced by a flat wall during the construction. A 40' long x 25' high trompe l'oeil mural was painted to provide the illusion of the curved apse. Over 170 years, the original mural was overpainted six times. We were commissioned to research the original, encapsulate what remained and to faithfully reproduce the original. In 2013, our team spent ten days meticulously removing at least six layers of overpaint to allow full scale mapping of the original layout from the exposures, detailed information on the hand(s) and stylistic approach of the original team of artists and the use of two late 1800's photographs to provide accurate data to allow a faithful replication of the mural. In the summer of 2014, we were contracted to reproduce the original mural. This was achieved in 12 weeks. We will detail the original research, including the paint stratigraphy prepared by our paint analyst, and review the methodology applied and the resulting replication.

Speaker(s)
avatar for Geoffrey Steward

Geoffrey Steward

CEO/Managing Director, International Fine Arts Conservation Studios Inc.
Background, Training and Career. Brixton School of Building, London, UK [1968] Trained as a Quantity Surveyor and involved with all aspects of Historic Building conservation and restoration whilst working in the UK for an Architectural practice [1969 - 1973], a Structural Engineering... Read More →

Co-Author(s)
avatar for Mary Aldrich

Mary Aldrich

Chief Conservator, International Fine Arts Conservation Studios Inc.
Conservator and Artist with knowledge in the application of various kinds of paints including: oil, acrylic, lime, calcimine, and glaze. Talented in matching colors and mixing paint by hand. Trained in decorative plaster casting and traditional plaster repair, stenciling, glazing... Read More →

Wednesday May 31, 2017 9:30am - 10:00am
Crystal Ballroom A Lobby Level, West Tower

9:30am

(Book & Paper + Research & Technical Studies) - Contacts that leave traces: investigations into the contamination of paper surfaces from handling
The contamination of paper surfaces during the process of handling documents is a significant issue for forensic scientists and conservators. In the forensic context, it has been found that polyvinyl chloride and latex gloves would leave handprints on porous and non-porous surfaces after 20-40 minutes of wear by a subject.[1] Anecdotally, it has been seen by both forensic practitioners and by fingerprint researchers at Curtin University that nitrile gloves can also leave fingermarks on paper after periods of wear. The issue of whether to wear gloves or not to wear gloves when handling documents has also been a matter of controversy in the conservation and archivist community.[2] Prue McKay at the National Archives of Australia carried out some preliminary studies to determine the potential for contamination from gloved and non-gloved hands when handling paper items.[3] However other than the papers mentioned above there is a paucity of published research in this area. A research project has been initiated at Curtin to explore this issue by using a range of forensic fingerprint techniques to investigate the level of fingermark contamination on paper items handled with bare and covered hands. Subsequently, the effect of latent fingermarks on paper items will be investigated using artificial aging. This presentation will give an overview of the background of the methods to be used as well as presenting some of our initial results. Acknowledgments: The authors thank Terry Kent and Prue McKay for useful discussion concerning this research. References [1] Willinski G. J Forensic Sci. 1980; 25(3):682-685 [2] Baker C.A and Silverman R. International Preservation News. 2005; 37: 4-17 [3] McKay P. 5th AICCM Book, Paper and Photographic Materials Symposium. 2008; 1-10

Speaker(s)
avatar for Karin van der Pal

Karin van der Pal

PhD Student, Curtin University
Karin J. van der Pal received her Bsc (Hons) in Chemistry from Curtin University, Western Australia. She is currently pursuing a PhD within the Nanochemistry Research Institue and Department of Chemistry at Curtin University, Western Australia. Her research involves the analysis of... Read More →

Co-Author(s)
avatar for Wilhelm van Bronswijk

Wilhelm van Bronswijk

Emeritus Professor, Curtin University
Professor Wilhelm van Bronswijk is an Emeritus Professor in the Department of Chemistry at Curtin Univerity. His research involves the application of infrared and Raman spectroscopy to a wide range of areas including forensic science and conservation studies.
avatar for Simon Lewis

Simon Lewis

Professor of Forensic and Analytical Chemistry and Director of Teaching and Learning in the Department of Chemistry, Curtin University
Simon Lewis is Professor of Forensic and Analytical Chemistry and Director of Teaching and Learning in the Department of Chemistry at Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia. His research is focused on chemical techniques applied to forensic analysis and he has published in excess... Read More →
avatar for Rachel S. Popelka-Filcoff

Rachel S. Popelka-Filcoff

Associate Professor, Flinders University
Rachel Popelka-Filcoff is an Associate Professor in the School of Chemical and Physical Sciences at Flinders University. Her research program uses radioanalytical and spectroscopic methods for the application to cultural heritage, environmental and forensic questions. In the cultural... Read More →
avatar for Gregory D. Smith

Gregory D. Smith

Otto N. Frenzel III Senior Conservation Scientist, Indianapolis Museum of Art
Gregory Dale Smith received a B.S. degree from Centre College of Kentucky in anthropology/sociology and chemistry before pursuing graduate studies at Duke University as an NSF graduate fellow in time-domain vibrational spectroscopy and archaeological fieldwork. His postgraduate training... Read More →

Wednesday May 31, 2017 9:30am - 10:00am
Regency A-B Ballroom Level, West Tower

9:30am

(Electronic Media) Framing the Jones Buffer: Documenting the History and Preservation of an Iconic Image-Processing Tool
Since the early 1970s, video artist and engineer Dave Jones has garnered iconic status as one of the most important video toolmakers within the Western and Upstate New York media art communities. He is well-known for transferring concepts and techniques from analog audio synthesis--such as filtering, sequencing, and voltage control--to the realm of video synthesis and image-processing. His most prominent inventions include the Jones Synchronizer, Jones Digitizer, Jones Sequencer, Jones Colorizer, Jones Keyer, and the Jones Frame Buffer. Jones' technological innovations in the creation of analog and digital tools for image-processing and generative video graphics have been invaluable contributions to the history and development of experimental video, having influenced artists such as Gary Hill, Peer Bode, and hundreds of artists-in-residence at the Experimental Television Center over the course of its 40 year legacy. His tools have served as integral devices for the creation and exhibition of video installations, many of which have since been collected and shown in numerous cultural heritage institutions. In her essay "Preserving Machines” from The Emergence of Video Processing Tools vol.2, Mona Jimenez posits that video processing tools, such as those created by Jones, are best documented and preserved through collaboration between conservators, toolmakers, artists, and scholars. Responding to this call, this paper will present the findings and results of a week-long residency at Signal Culture alongside Dave Jones, as a case study in producing comprehensive and centralized documentation of a complex image-processing tool, addressing origin and development, technical specifications, conservation issues and recommendations, as well as the broader context of its enduring influence artists and the history of media art.

Speaker(s)
avatar for Athena Christa Holbrook

Athena Christa Holbrook

Collection Specialist, Museum of Modern Art
Athena Christa Holbrook is the Collection Specialist in the Department of Media and Performance Art at the Museum of Modern Art. Prior to joining MoMA, Athena held the position of time-based media conservation associate for the Kramlich Collection/New Art Trust and worked as collection... Read More →


Wednesday May 31, 2017 9:30am - 10:00am
Comiskey Concourse Level, West Tower

9:30am

(Objects) So Delicate, yet So Strong: The Use of Paper in Objects Conservation
A large variety of acid-free papers offer object conservators endless options in our work. We share the use of this unique material with our colleagues in the field of paper conservation, which includes a wide range of Japanese and other Asian papers as well as Western acid-free papers. Furthermore, we have borrowed from the paper conservation field the extremely clever and elegant methods and techniques of handling and manipulating this material when we do our 3-D conservation treatments. The lure of paper lies in its properties, which superbly fit material requirements in modern conservation practice, namely reversibility, strength, inertness, permanence, stability, and minimal change in color over time. The fact that paper is light weight and non-hazardous to the conservator's health and the environment are additional advantageous properties. 
Having received training in paper conservation early on in her conservation career the author has continuously applied or adapted paper conservation techniques in her objects conservation treatment work. Over time the numerous applications of paper in Artal-Isbrand's treatment work on objects became the subject of a yearly one-day seminar at the Winterthur/University of Delaware art conservation training program. The author will describe how the material paper can serve two very different functions in a conservation treatment. It can be used as a restoration material where it physically remains with the artwork once the treatment is complete, and it can also function as a tool during treatment and not remain with the artwork once the treatment is complete. In the first scenario paper can serve as a fill material, a bulking agent, a reinforcement material, a support or isolating layer or even as a "pigment” or "inpainting material”. In the second scenario it can function as a facing material, a mold material, a poultice material, a temporary support material during filling, or a material to take fine impressions. A selection of case studies will be presented. The subsequent published article will be more comprehensive, and will include a full bibliography of publications relating to this subject.

Speaker(s)
avatar for Paula Artal-Isbrand

Paula Artal-Isbrand

Conservator, Worcester Art Museum
M.A. in Art Conservation, Buffalo State College, 1994; Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, 1994-1996; Worcester Art Museum, 1996-present;Private conservation practice, 1999-present--clients include the Harvard Art Museum, Harvard University Law School-Special Collections, Yale University... Read More →


Wednesday May 31, 2017 9:30am - 10:00am
Crystal Ballroom B Lobby Level, West Tower

9:30am

(Paintings) Mapping a way forward: Bringing an artwork back from self-destruction
In 2009 The Cleveland Museum of Art (CMA) purchased the sculpture titled Mapa estelar en árbol by contemporary Mexican artist Gabriel Orozco. While the work was described as resurrecting an old-Master technique, the application of the historic materials was anything but. In construction the work resembles a panel painting, but that the panel is a 30-40 cm thick cross-section of a mango tree trunk almost 70 cm in diameter and sits on the floor as a sculpture for viewers to walk around. Another deviation from panel painting is that instead of decorating the tangential surface of the wood, it is the end grain that bears the design. The artwork comprises wood, with canvas, gesso and graphite incised with a geometrical sgraffito design on the front and a waxy coating on the back. However, the presence of the canvas was omitted from any description and materials listing from the artist and gallery. Another discrepancy in the materials included the white ground, which was described on different occasions by the curator, artist, and gallery as gesso, dead plaster (possibly slaked lime), and calcium sulfate (plaster) and animal glue. Upon arrival to the museum just months after its premiere showing in Mexico City, several areas of fine cracking and the beginnings of delamination were already noted on the painted surface. The sculpture was placed in storage at a stable 50% RH and upon examination a year later the surface displayed a significant change in appearance. The canvas was buckling with apparent shrinkage of the wood and large areas of gesso were being pushed off the surface with the cracking exponentially increased. A horror to any collection steward, the work was no longer exhibitable. The gallery was notified and it was decided that the piece should be sent back to Mexico City for examination and for a discussion with the artist. Negotiations between the CMA, gallery, artist, and fabricator (also a conservator) led to a decision that the conservator/fabricator in Mexico City would attempt restoration knowing that CMA paintings and objects conservators deemed the work beyond conservation and that any intervention was going to be visible and show previous damage. The CMA reserved the right to reject the restored work based on appearance and would not accept the work remade in the same manner as the original. The fabricator's effort was not successful and the design elements were removed. An alternative approach to remaking the work was presented by CMA conservators prior to the treatment campaign that could potentially maintain the desired appearance but would diverge from the "traditional” materials chosen by the artist. The conservation efforts that followed were a result of several rounds of material testing and treatment discussions and collaborations with the gallery, artist, and fabricator. An overview of the testing process, the conservation intervention, level of collaboration and involvement, and ramifications to the artist's intent will be discussed.

Speaker(s)
avatar for Per Knutås-[PA]

Per Knutås-[PA]

Chief Conservator, Cleveland Museum of Art
Per Knutås is the Eric and Jane Nord Chief Conservator at the Cleveland Museum of Art where he oversees a department of 15 conservators and conservation technicians. He graduated from The School of Conservation at the Royal Danish Academy of Art, in Copenhagen, Denmark with a focus... Read More →

Co-Author(s)
avatar for Samantha Springer-[PA]

Samantha Springer-[PA]

Conservator, Portland Art Museum
Samantha Springer relocated to Portland, Oregon in 2015 to take the position of Conservator at the Portland Art Museum. While Samantha remains a generalist due to her responsibility for care of a broad collection, she has particular interest in preventive conservation, sustainability... Read More →

Wednesday May 31, 2017 9:30am - 10:00am
Regency C Ballroom Level, West Tower

9:30am

(Photographic Materials) A Pilot Project to treat photogravures on Gampi paper from Edward Curtis' 'The North American Indian'
In 1907 Edward S. Curtis, with seed money from financier and collector J. Pierpont Morgan and support from President Theodore Roosevelt, began a herculean undertaking to publish "The North American Indian".  A tribute to the ‘vanishing race' this monumental project had as its goal the documentation of all major surviving Native American groups living in North America.  Each deluxe set included twenty bound volumes of Curtis' extensive text, illustrated with about seventy-five copper plate photogravures made from his photographs. In addition, each volume included twenty folios of larger gravures, only a small percentage of which were printed on Japanese gampi paper, the subject of this study. While most volumes of Curtis' monumental project are in various institutional hands, a photograph conservation studio received a rare set from a private collector in 2014 that would benefit from treatment to remove stains and distortions. The set comprised 722 copper plate photogravures printed in brown ink, each presented in a Van Gelder Zonen paper window mat, and tipped onto a one-ply backing embossed with the stamp Cranbrook Institute of Science. A pilot project began with an initial sample group of ten representative gravures, window mats and backings, selected with the goal of establishing a reproducible treatment protocol for the entire set of 722 prints, cost estimates for materials and labor, and a time schedule for conservation treatment and re-housing. This paper describes the challenge of finding a treatment that allowed for the washing and drying of these extremely thin and reactive gampi papers while retaining their characteristic smooth and lustrous texture. Past research on the treatment of gampi papers was reviewed and incorporated into the trials. Washing techniques tested included float washing, immersion washing, and light bleaching in variously-adjusted, deionized water solutions. Drying techniques tested included: friction drying between a variety of tissues and papers; drying between various materials such as ragboard, polyester (Mylar), cotton blotters, felts, and two types of fabric membranes - a polytetrafluorethylene film (Gore-tex), and a polyester/nonwoven material (Sympatex); and stretch drying the gampi tissue between lining papers, adhered at edges, to a smooth countertop. The trials produced a range of results - some very good, but none that completely achieved the desired drying results, i.e. returning the surface texture to its original appearance.  During testing, the authors consulted with several colleagues for suggestions on expanding and refining methodologies. The collaboration led to a satisfactory treatment method, a variation on a hard-soft drying package, which is described in this paper. Sustainability of materials was also considered in a final recommendation.

Speaker(s)
avatar for Rachel Danzing, [PA]

Rachel Danzing, [PA]

Conservator of Art on Paper, Rachel Danzing Art Conservation, LLC
Rachel Danzing is a paper conservator in private practice in New York City. After she received her MA in art history and diploma in conservation from the Institute of Fine Arts, New York University in 1992, Rachel worked in the conservation laboratory at the Brooklyn Museum for over... Read More →

Co-Author(s)
AB

Ann Baldwin

Conservator of works of art on paper, Greenwich Studios, Inc
Ann Baldwin is a paper conservator in private practice in Greenwich, CT. She received an MA in art history and diploma in conservation from the Institute of Fine Arts, New York University, in 1998, studying with Margaret Holben Ellis. Ann trained with Antoinette Owen and Rachel Danzing... Read More →

Wednesday May 31, 2017 9:30am - 10:00am
Michigan 1A-B Concourse Level, East Tower

9:30am

(Textiles) Costume Loans: Challenges and Strategies
When requesting a loan of costume objects for an exhibition, institutions unfamiliar with exhibiting garments and accessories may underestimate the amount of time and work involved in preparing and installing these types of objects. Imagine a courier arrives at your institution with a costume ensemble for your exhibition, and the mannequin you've provided is too big around the waist. Or there's no head for the hat, and wait—this ensemble doesn't come with shoes?! Now imagine you are that courier, and on a tight deadline to install. Mounting a costume on a mannequin is much different than hanging a painting on a wall. But, with careful planning and preparation on the part of both the lender and borrower, a successful loan of costume is possible. This paper will offer strategies for lenders and borrowers to avoid potential costume loan pitfalls related to packing, mounting, installation, and display. Exhibiting costume has its own set of unique challenges and requirements, and this paper will detail those challenges and provide strategies for dealing with each one. Methods for packing garments for travel will be discussed, as well as standard display requirements for costume. Choosing a suitable mannequin or dress form will be addressed, keeping in mind not only the size of the garment but also the appropriate body shape for the time period. Accessories, both as museum objects themselves, as well as props to complete a total look, will also be discussed. The goal is to not only keep the objects safe during travel, installation, and display, but also to ensure the proper appearance of the ensemble. Of course, all of this takes time; this paper will aim to help in estimating the time required for preparing costumes for travel and exhibition. Examples of courier experiences at costume loan installations will provide insight into the types of issues that can arise. While much of museum loan arrangements are handled by registrars and curatorial staff, it's important that conservators and installers are included in loan discussions from the beginning, and participate in the decision making process. With so many variables, lending and borrowing costume often requires problem solving, as no two loans are the same. This paper will provide a set of guidelines to serve as a starting point for institutions without much experience in borrowing or lending costume for exhibition.

Speaker(s)
avatar for Cassandra Gero

Cassandra Gero

Assistant Conservator, Metropolitan Museum of Art
Cassandra Gero is an Assistant Conservator for The Costume Institute at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, where her main focus is preparing objects for interdepartmental and outgoing loans. She previously worked in the Collections department of the Costume Institute, and also at the... Read More →


Wednesday May 31, 2017 9:30am - 10:00am
Crystal Ballroom C Lobby Level, West Tower

9:30am

(Wooden Artifacts) A New Tool for the Traditional Toolbox
This paper details the combining of traditional French marquetry techniques with contemporary CNC inlay methods. The project is the replacement of a lost marquetry top for a writing desk base attributed to Jean Francoise Oeben. The top chosen for reproduction was the well known mechanical desk by Oeben at the Getty Museum. Topics discussed are ethical considerations, the relative advantages of each process, and similar works by Oeben in public collections. Also noted are sources of period veneers and substitutions for commercially extinct woods.

Speaker(s)
avatar for Alton Bowman-[PA]

Alton Bowman-[PA]

Senior Conservator, Alton Bowman Studio
Alton Bowman is senior conservator and owner of Alton Bowman Studio in Flower Mound Texas, near Dallas, since 1970. He studied art at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts in Philadelphia, and Northwood School of Contemporary Art. He participated in the first French Furniture Study... Read More →


Wednesday May 31, 2017 9:30am - 10:00am
Acapulco Ballroom Level, West Tower

9:40am

(Sustainability) Students for Sustainability in Conservation
Sustainability in conservation is an emerging area of concern and importance. The main focus has been on larger scale issues, such as climate control in museums, packaging/shipping, storage and lighting. Conservators individually should also be aware of smaller scale initiatives to be more green in daily practice. In order to enhance the role of sustainability in everyday conservation, it is necessary to begin incorporating eco-friendly practices into education and training programs. Doing so ensures that future generations of conservators think sustainably. In order to promote sustainability at the student level, I have started an initiative to bring the international community of students together and show how they can make a difference. SSiC, Students for Sustainability in Conservation, is an international platform for students, educators and professionals in the field to come together and share their ideas, questions and innovations regarding sustainability in conservation. SSiC presents initiatives that are easy to implement in any lab or studio, and also provides the opportunity for individuals to share their projects. SSiC promotes the concept that little changes make a huge difference. By spreading awareness, SSiC hopes to inspire the conservators of the future to a more sustainable direction.  SSiC highlights key areas in which conservators can reduce waste and become more sustainable, and particularly how students can become involved and impact the future of conservation. SSiC showcases initiatives that are easy to implement in any studio. The RightCycle Program is one such program, which is currently undergoing a trial run at the University of Amsterdam and the Rijksmuseum Amsterdam. The use of disposable gloves is a huge source of waste in conservation. Gloves are a major contributor to landfill waste and pollution from incineration. The RightCycle program can help reduce the amount of waste produced from using disposable gloves. RightCycle is a recycling program for non-hazardous disposable nitrile gloves and is easy to implement and use. RightCycle* is a propriety program from Kimberly-Clark Professional. Disposable nitrile gloves cannot be recycled through normal plastic recycling due to their composition. The newly developed program breaks down used gloves into powder using cryogenic processes to make new eco-friendly consumer products, such as patio furniture but also construction material like panels. The program is simple to use: after the gloves are used they are simply disposed of into the recycling box instead of the trash can. When the box is full, the gloves are picked up. The one stipulation for the program is that only Kimberly-Clark Professional gloves are eligible for recycling. Kimberly-Clark Professional offers a range of high quality gloves under the KIMTECH* brand for the program that meet the various standards and needs of the conservator. Programs like RightCycle are easy ways for conservation labs to become more sustainable. SSiC provides awareness about these kinds of programs and initiatives and information about how to set them up in your studio. The aim is to promote an international, unified effort to bring sustainability to the foreground.

Speaker(s)
avatar for Caitlin Southwick

Caitlin Southwick

Conservator, University of Amsterdam
Caitlin Southwick is the founder of SiC, a professional member of the AIC Sustainability Committee and the secretary of the ICOM Working Group on Sustainability. She is active in presenting on the topic of sustainability in conservation at conferences worldwide and has attended conferences... Read More →


Wednesday May 31, 2017 9:40am - 10:00am
Plaza Ballroom Lobby Level, East Tower

10:00am

Break in the Exhibit Hall
Wednesday May 31, 2017 10:00am - 10:30am
Riverside West Exhibit Hall Exhibit Level, East Tower

10:30am

(Sustainability) Fast, Cheap, and Sustainable: 3-D printing exhibition book cradles
3-D printers and Makerspaces are a growing presence in libraries. While frequently marketed as a service to students and community members, 3-D printers [also referred to as Rapid Prototyping (RP) or FFF (Fused Filament Fabrication)] can be used by conservators and exhibition designers to produce affordable custom book mounts from stable, recyclable polymers. The University of Florida's Smathers Libraries are experimenting with printing custom mounts for temporary exhibitions. Rather than purchasing generic, expensive plexi mounts, they are designed in-house, using freely available Computer-Aided Design and Drawing (CAD) software to fit unique openings of selected volumes. The mounts are printed in house on one of the Libraries' FFF printers using commercially available polymers.

This presentation will explore the Smathers Libraries' process for designing mounts, selecting polymers, printing process, and cost analysis, from the point of view of the conservator, exhibit designer, and university librarian. The presenters will also discuss issues with and limitations to the current procedures, including the possibility of recycling the mounts following exhibition into reusable filament.

Speaker(s)
avatar for Fletcher B. Durant

Fletcher B. Durant

Librarian (Preservation), Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Fletcher Durant is the Preservation Librarian at the University of Florida Smathers Libraries. His work focuses on the preventive conservation of library and archival materials, the sustainability of cultural heritage, and risk management. He is a trained book and paper conservator... Read More →

Co-Author(s)
avatar for Lourdes Santamaría-Wheeler

Lourdes Santamaría-Wheeler

Exhibits Coordinator, University of Florida George A. Smathers Libaraies
Lourdes Santamaría-Wheeler is the Exhibits Coordinator at the University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries. There she oversees an exhibition program that enhances research and learning opportunities by sharing and interpreting the Libraries’ collections. Her work addresses... Read More →

Wednesday May 31, 2017 10:30am - 10:50am
Plaza Ballroom Lobby Level, East Tower

10:30am

(Architecture) 500 Capp Street: Conservation of Interior Contemporary Finishes and Artwork by David Ireland
ARG Conservation Services (ARG/CS) was contracted by the 500 Capp Street Foundation to perform exterior and interior conservation work of a vacant residence constructed circa 1880 at 500 Capp Street, San Francisco, CA, while it underwent seismic retrofitting, elevator access, and building additions to be converted into a mansion-museum and gallery space. What sets this residence apart from the other Victorian residences in the rapidly gentrifying Latino neighborhood of the Mission District, is that it was once inhabited by famous contemporary artist David Ireland during the 1970-80s. Ireland had filled the house with his artwork and had finished all the walls and floors using commercial products of his time that have since then been discontinued. This presentation will discuss how ARG/CS approached the de-installation, packaging, storage, and re-installation of contemporary artwork, and the conservation treatments performed on Ireland's contemporary interior finishes with a focus on the lustrous ocher-colored varnished walls, which are unique and characteristic to 500 Capp Street. Conservation work of interior finishes was done room-by-room and coordinated with contractors on site doing seismic retrofitting, electrical, and building additions. Each room was sectioned off with protection and contained to prevent the transmission of dust and workers on site from accidently touching conservation work. Prior to conservation work, all contemporary artwork that could be removed was carefully assessed, recorded, dismantled, and stored. Artwork that could not be removed was assessed, recorded, and provided protection in-situ. Conservation work consisted of carefully dry cleaning all the walls of general soiling that had built up over the years. Selective wet cleaning was performed on areas with heavier staining and soiling. Areas with holes were re-plastered and in-painted to match the surrounding walls. Cracks were stabilized by injection grouting. Lastly, walls were re-varnished using an oil-based varnish similar to what Ireland may have used. The selected varnish had to be manipulated in application to mimic the high VOC (no longer legal in California) and slow setting time of the oil-based varnish used by Ireland. Varnish was applied quickly using rollers that left behind a mirror-like finish that did not detract from Ireland's brush strokes and marks. Floors were also finished in a high-gloss oil-based varnish as they had been historically. Once the conservation work of the interior finishes had been completed, stored artwork was re-installed. Re-installation depended on careful documentation of the artwork's conditions, locations, and positioning prior to de-installation. Re-installation was coordinated with the 500 Capp St. Foundation and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA). Interior spaces were acclimatized to receive artwork on loan from the SFMOMA.

Speaker(s)
avatar for Dena Kefallinos

Dena Kefallinos

Asst Project Manager, Conservator, ARG Conservation Services
Dena is an Architectural Conservator and an Assistant Project Manager at ARG Conservation Services in San Francisco, California. She has experience in performing conditions assessments on historic structures, devising technical building specifications and drawings, and formulating... Read More →

Co-Author(s)
avatar for Johana Moreno

Johana Moreno

Senior Conservator, ARG Conservation Services
Johana Moreno is a Conservator at ARG Conservation Services with seventeen years of experience working for leading art and archaeological museums, art galleries, and architectural conservation companies. Her expertise is in conservation of objects and artwork. She has taught conservation... Read More →

Wednesday May 31, 2017 10:30am - 11:00am
Crystal Ballroom A Lobby Level, West Tower

10:30am

(Book & Paper + Research & Technical Studies) - Revisiting paper pH determination: 40 years of evolving practice in the Library of Congress Preservation Research and Testing Laboratory
The pH of paper is a fundamental indicator of its long-term stability, and is routinely considered by conservators, cultural heritage scientists, and collection care professionals in the process of making decisions about collection storage, handling and access policies. The results of pH are frequently considered as part of conservation treatment planning, and are nearly always included in research studies related to paper preservation. An assortment of measurement methods are currently in use. This seemingly basic and familiar measurement, however, contains a depth and complexity that becomes apparent when pondering the differences between the industrial, ISO standard, and the numerous published variant methods, including surface measurements, miniaturized methods, cold extraction, and hot extraction. Are the results comparable from the different methods? Which approach is best? Over the last few years, the Library of Congress Preservation Research and Testing Division (PRTD) has revisited its standard protocols for pH measurement of paper and board in the contexts of quality assurance needs for collection housing and exhibition materials, special collections needs, and scientific research samples. This talk will include a short discussion of the fundamentals of paper pH measurement, focusing on how aspects of sampling, sample preparation and measurement method affect the results obtained. The various methods in use in our lab from the early 1970's to the present will be discussed, with focus on our recent efforts to streamline our semi-automated measurements, to conduct direct comparisons between methods, and to develop a reliable miniaturized pH determination method.

Speaker(s)
avatar for Cindy Connelly Ryan-[PA]

Cindy Connelly Ryan-[PA]

Preservation Science Specialist, Library of Congress
Cindy Connelly Ryan is a specialist in historic artists' practices with a background in physics (Carnegie-Mellon University) and art conservation (New York University). She held a Forbes Fellowship at the Freer/Sackler Galleries of the Smithsonian Institution before joining PRTD in... Read More →

Co-Author(s)
avatar for Eric Breitung

Eric Breitung

Research Scientist, Department of Scientific Research, The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Eric Breitung, Research Scientist, specializes in modern preservation materials and museum environment issues in the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Department of Scientific Research. His work includes the development of advanced analytical test methods for assessing commercial materials... Read More →
avatar for Lynn Brostoff

Lynn Brostoff

Research Chemist, Library of Congress
Lynn B. Brostoff holds a Masters Degree in Polymer Materials Science and a Ph.D. in Chemistry. In addition, Lynn holds a Masters Degree in Art History and a Certificate of Conservation with emphasis in Paper Conservation. For the last 25 years, Lynn has worked as a conservation scientist... Read More →
avatar for Michele Youket

Michele Youket

Preservation Specialist, Preservation Research and Testing Division, Library of Congress
Michele Youket is a Preservation Specialist in the Preservation Research & Testing Division of the Library of Congress. Ms.Youket coordinates the Quality Assurance Program, which is responsible for developing specifications and testing products procured by the Library to provide preservation... Read More →

Wednesday May 31, 2017 10:30am - 11:00am
Regency A-B Ballroom Level, West Tower

10:30am

(Electronic Media) (Not) Freaking Out Over the Videofreex: Preserving a Video Collective Archive
Video Data Bank (VDB) is a leading resource in the United States for video by and about contemporary artists. The VDB Collection includes the work of more than 550 artists and 6,000 video art titles, and work is available to exhibitors through an international distribution service. Steadfast in staying ahead of exhibitors needs, VDB has been long committed to digitization and preservation of its video archive, including the Videofreex Archive special collection. Founded in 1969, the Videofreex were one of the first video collectives in America: through the mid-1970s they produced content using newly available consumer video equipment that chronicled the counter-culture movement and broadcasted the first pirate TV station in the country from Lanesville, NY. In 2001, VDB began acquiring the Videofreex tapes from locations around the country, the majority of which are on ½” open reel. Digitizing the tapes has been a high priority for VDB, and thanks to generous donations early on, many tapes were digitized through the Bay Area Video Coalition's Preservation Access Program. In 2014, VDB received project funding to enhance ongoing, in-house digitization activities. This presentation will discuss the work involved in preserving the Videofreex Archive, from initially acquiring, cataloging, and prioritizing the tapes, to recent in-house digitization activities – notably, obtaining and repairing ½” open reel decks, as well as cleaning and stabilizing tapes against further deterioration.

Speaker(s)
avatar for Kristin MacDonough

Kristin MacDonough

Time-Based Media Conservation Fellow, Art Institute of Chicago

Co-Author(s)
avatar for Tom Colley

Tom Colley

Archive and Collection Manager, Video Data Bank
Tom Colley is the Archive and Collection Manager at the Video Data Bank at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. The VDB is a leading resource in the United States for video by and about contemporary artists. Through its distribution and preservation activities the VDB works... Read More →

Wednesday May 31, 2017 10:30am - 11:00am
Comiskey Concourse Level, West Tower

10:30am

(Objects) Archaeological Glass Conservation: Comparative approaches & practicalities of using acrylic resin films as gap fills
The conservation of archaeological vessel glass is notable for the challenges inherent in loss compensation and has seen conservators creatively manipulating many materials to varying degrees of success. Conventional gap-filling techniques using epoxy resins are now widely regarded as inappropriate. One of the latest emerging techniques is the use of customisable Paraloid B-72 films, established by Koob et al. at the Corning Museum of Glass. This talk presents two alternative approaches to loss compensation in archaeological glass using acrylic resin gap fills. The authors reflect on their independent experiences in adapting this technique and consider each against the backdrop of Koob's own recommendations. The approaches described here illustrate the practicalities, challenges and conclusions drawn from the application - through trial and error - of this technique, including:

• Casting of films of varying thickness, colour, transparency & flexibility
• Experimentation & use of different resin compositions
• Shaping of fills
• Manipulation of fills and their adhesion to the glass body

The presentation highlights the similarities and differences in decision making by conservators working separately at UCL and the Royal Albert Memorial Musuem (Exeter, UK), while replicating a given treatment methodology. It also advocates the use of collaboration and knowledge-sharing in tackling a conservation issue. Ultimately, through sharing these experiences, both case studies serve as a guide for conservators wishing to implement similar treatments in the future. It is hoped that in doing so, the professional conservator's repertoire for the treatment of archaeological glass will be expanded upon, allowing for the significance of fragmentary archaeological glass to be better preserved.

Speaker(s)
avatar for Jan Cutajar

Jan Cutajar

UCL Research Assitant, UCL
Jan Cutajar has recently finished his conservation programme at UCL in September 2016, reading for an MSc in Conservation for Archaeology and Museums. He also holds an MA in Principles of Conservation from the same institution as well as a BSc (Hons.) (Melit.) in Chemistry from the... Read More →

Co-Author(s)
avatar for Hana Bristow

Hana Bristow

Assistant Conservator, National Museum of the Royal Navy, Portsmouth
Hana Bristow recently graduated with a Distinction in MA Conservation of Archeaological & Museum Objects at Durham University in 2015, having formerly studied BA Archaeology, Anthropology & Art History (University of East Anglia) and MA Material & Visual Culture (Anthropology) at... Read More →

Wednesday May 31, 2017 10:30am - 11:00am
Crystal Ballroom B Lobby Level, West Tower

10:30am

(Photographic Materials) Uncovering Irving Penn's Chemical Treatment Techniques
Irving Penn printed a series of gelatin silver photographs in 1949 and 1950, titled the Nudes. Regarded as a departure from the smooth, sleek forms and thin models of his fashion photography, these photographs were a chance for Penn to revel in the material possibilities of the medium. In particular, Penn was intrigued by how the photographic image could be manipulated in the darkroom to produce variable densities, ranges in image tone, and even alteration of the gelatin binder. Available sources suggest he used non-standard chemistry, specifically a bleach-and-redevelopment technique, which produced the unique visual characteristics of the Nudes. However, these sources, as well as the photographer's archival records from the series, include very little technical information about his process. This research was undertaken in the hopes of discovering the cause of the material modifications Penn brought about in this body of work. This paper presents the findings of research into possible darkroom methods used for the Nudes series.

The available art historical literature on Penn proposes a bleach-and-redevelopment process, and offers a citation for the photography manual from which Penn and his printer drew their recipes. Using this as a starting point, several hypotheses were developed for potential bleaching procedures. These hypotheses were further refined after a survey of the Nudes in the collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, and following an interview with the printer, now in his 90s, who worked with Penn on the Nudes. The hypotheses sought to explain both the general technique and the specific chemistry that was used. Ultimately two bleach-and-redevelopment process were tested, as well as one process using bleaching alone.

This paper outlines the evidence in favor of each of these three darkroom techniques, including historical information, the chemical mechanisms of each, and the results of replication experiments which have been performed for each process. Preliminary XRF measurements are also presented. XRF has shown potential as a method for identifying certain bleach-and-redevelopment treatments whose chemistry may leave elemental markers in the finished print, possibly in the form of non-silver image material. Tentative results will be presented, as well as areas for further exploration. The research conducted thus far has contributed to a more complete material understanding of the Nudes series and is an example of how such work can complement art historical investigation.

Speaker(s)
avatar for Laura Panadero

Laura Panadero

Paper Conservation Fellow, Straus Center for Conservation and Technical Studies
Laura Panadero is the Craigen W. Bowen Paper Conservation Fellow at the Straus Center for Conservation and Technical Studies, Harvard Art Museums where she works on photographic materials, prints, drawings, and albums. She graduated in May 2017 from New York University's Institute... Read More →


Wednesday May 31, 2017 10:30am - 11:00am
Michigan 1A-B Concourse Level, East Tower

10:30am

(Textiles) Learning from treatments that did not go as planned
This paper will focus on an 1860s silk dress, which is in the costume collection of the Rijksmuseum Amsterdam. This dress is made from an unique moiré fabric, and still has its original construction, which is rare because costumes were often altered. The dress has features typical of the period: a wide oval-shaped skirt with a flat front and flared sleeves. The skirt would have been supported by a crinoline cage. The dress was selected for a publication featuring about a hundred of the most interesting costumes in the Rijksmuseum collection. This meant the dress needed to be photographed on a mannequin to show the appropriate silhouette. Even with minimal handling, strain on the material cannot be avoided during the process of mounting the costume onto a mannequin. To be handled and mounted interventive conservation was needed in order to stabilize the dress. In 2012 possible treatment plans were discussed by the curator and the textile conservation team. Unfortunately, during treatment it was found that the silk moiré and the threads used to stitch the different parts together were more fragile than anticipated, which made the handling of the dress especially challenging. During handling and attaching the support to the object some strain on the seams was inevitable. This caused slits in certain areas and some pleats became detached. This, in addition to a change of plans concerning the publication, was the reason that the treatment remained unfinished. In 2016 the treatment was continued by a different conservator. When re-evaluating the treatment, different questions arose. The main question was whether the negative side-effects of the treatment could have been prevented. If not, what were the consequences for the state of the object? This paper will illustrate the difficulties of dealing with a treatment that did not go as planned. In general we often only have the opportunity to learn from successful conservation experiences, but how can we learn from treatments that were not successful? Additionally, the complications associated with two conservators working subsequently on the same object in a relatively short time frame, as well as the considerations of re- or undoing previous treatments will be discussed. The silk moiré dress is a valuable case study for illustrating and discussing both practical and ethical solutions.

Speaker(s)
avatar for Suzan Meijer

Suzan Meijer

Head of Textile Conservation, Rijksmuseum
Suzan Meijer studied Textile Conservation at the State Training School for Conservators in Amsterdam (1988-1992). She started working as Textile and Upholstery conservator at the Rijksmuseum in 1993. Since 1997 she is Head of Textile Conservation. The Rijksmuseum has a very important... Read More →

Co-Author(s)
avatar for Marjolein Koek

Marjolein Koek

Textile Conservator, Rijksmuseum
Marjolein Koek works as a junior textile conservator at the Rijksmuseum Amsterdam. She graduated from the University of Amsterdam in 2014, with a Master’s and Post-Master’s Degree in Conservation and Restoration, specializing in textiles. During her training she did internships... Read More →

Wednesday May 31, 2017 10:30am - 11:00am
Crystal Ballroom C Lobby Level, West Tower

10:30am

(Wooden Artifacts) Understanding Currently Accepted Practice: Wood fills and conservation material decision-making
The process of deciding which conservation materials to use when planning a treatment is of natural interest to conservators-in-training. However, results from a series of interviews with professional object conservators in the UK indicate that material choice in conservation is worthy of scrutiny by the profession as a whole. Wood is a material that may require conservation fills for a variety of reasons. When it comes to choosing a wood fill material, there are many different combinations of adhesive and bulking agent that have been or could be used successfully. Many adhesives used on wood have been studied scientifically, with case studies published about their use in conservation. There are fewer studies on the use and properties of bulked adhesives. Without guidance from the literature, how do object conservators make decisions about what materials to use? A series of interviews were conducted with object conservators from a variety of backgrounds, working at six different museums in the UK. The results of the interviews show several obstacles in conservation practice that may at times prevent conservators from achieving high standards of material decision-making.The results of this research will be discussed during this presentation, with the goal of introducing a more open dialogue about material choice in conservation practice.

Speaker(s)
avatar for Megan Narvey

Megan Narvey

Object Conservation Intern, UCL/Canadian Conservation Institute
Megan Narvey is a recent graduate of the MSc in Conservation for Archaeology and Museums at University College London (UCL), and is currently working at the Canadian Conservation Institute as an objects conservation intern. She has also completed the MA in Principles of Conservation... Read More →


Wednesday May 31, 2017 10:30am - 11:00am
Acapulco Ballroom Level, West Tower

10:30am

(Paintings) Tips Session
Wednesday May 31, 2017 10:30am - 11:30am
Regency C Ballroom Level, West Tower

11:00am

(Architecture) Conservation in Context: Considerations in Treatment Planning in Relation to the Safety of Conservators and the General Public
One of the primary concerns for most conservators is the safety of the treatment on the material receiving treatment. However, one often overlooked consideration in treatment planning is the safety of the treatment for those carrying it out as well as the general public that may be exposed, particularly in the case of in-situ works and built heritage. Treatment dangers come in many different forms, including exposure to hazardous chemicals, extreme temperatures, vapors, particulates, falling hazards, sharp objects, and more. This presentation seeks to explore some of the common hazardous conditions created by conservation treatments, alternatives and their trade offs, and methods to offset the risk. A variety of case study sites in the New York City area will be discussed. 

Speaker(s)
avatar for Beata Sasinska

Beata Sasinska

Conservator, EverGreene Architectural Arts, Inc.
Beata is a Conservator wth Evergreene Architectural Arts, and has completed a wide array of projects in plaster, decorative finishes, stone, wood, metals, and other architectural materials at sites such as the New York Public Library, St. Paul's Chapel, and the Berlin Wall Fragment... Read More →


Wednesday May 31, 2017 11:00am - 11:30am
Crystal Ballroom A Lobby Level, West Tower

11:00am

(Book & Paper + Research & Technical Studies) - Centuries of Cellulose: Lessons Learned from the Molecular Size of Cellulose in Naturally-Aged Paper Collections
Size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) has been used successfully for many decades as a tool to quantify the molecular structures of large synthetic polymers and to draw connections between molecular size and material properties. In contrast to the success of SEC for measuring synthetic polymers, paper and cellulosic polymers provide inherent difficulties for similar chromatographic analyses. Improvements in instrumentation and experimental procedures have slowly and markedly improved the current state of molecular characterization of cellulose by SEC. This work begins to draw connections between the size distributions of cellulose molecules to the known properties of variously treated and aged collection materials. The Barrow Books Collection at the Library of Congress provided an excellent starting point for using SEC in complement with other analytical techniques, both non-invasive and destructive, to evaluate the long term stability and treatment of paper-based collections. Existing data from the well-characterized collection includes chemical-scale properties (e.g., pH and chemical functionality) up to macro-scale properties (e.g., mechanical strength and colorfastness). However, a gap has long existed between these two scales. Little data is available at the scale of polymeric macromolecules, where initially minute chemical changes eventually translate to macroscale degradation. Recent work from the Preservation Research & Testing labs at the Library of Congress has used both the Barrow Books Collection as well as a selection of paper from American sources to investigate how SEC might be used to complement existing conservation data and analyses. For example, SEC quantifiably identifies the consequence of alkali treatments on preserving cellulose polymer chain lengths, which strongly correlates to eventual paper embrittlement. Attempts at correlating new experimental data with existing data from books in Library's collection also demonstrates the inherent challenges and opportunities for using SEC to identify structure-property relationships between the molecular structure of cellulose and the properties of aged paper collections. Assessing various conversation treatments in this way could better inform conservators on predicting the efficacy of paper preservation treatments. It appears likely that minute changes in the statistical distribution of polymer sizes in aged paper, easily measured by SEC, could provide an early indicator of degradation and might allow improved design of artificial aging studies. More effectively linking micro analytical determinants to current destructive mechanical testing is critical for assessing use and condition of paper based historic collections.

Speaker(s)
avatar for Andrew Davis

Andrew Davis

Chemist, Library of Congress
Dr. Andrew Davis is a chemist and polymer scientist in Library of Congress’s Preservation Research and Testing Division. He is currently focused on collections preservation by studying the fundamental degradation science of polymer-based materials, including paper, film, and modern... Read More →

Co-Author(s)
avatar for Fenella France

Fenella France

Library of Congress

Wednesday May 31, 2017 11:00am - 11:30am
Regency A-B Ballroom Level, West Tower

11:00am

(Electronic Media) Overcoming your control issues—Arduinos as an emulation strategy
Arduinos are low-cost, open-source and easy-to-use microcontrollers, supported by a large community. As a flexible and programmable platform, they can take input, monitor processes, create output, and connect to a number of external devices and custom electronic circuits using various protocols. Their design is tailored towards a non-technical audience, which makes them accessible tools for both advanced technicians and anyone less familiar with electronics. Originally created for artists and designers, they are found in numerous contemporary art installations. By describing two case studies, this paper explores their application as part of a conservation treatment: Bruce Nauman's Life Death/Knows Doesn't Know, 1983, a neon lights installation whose sequencer stopped working; and Anthony McCall's Slit Scan, 1972, a high-speed slide projection that ran too fast with available slide projectors. While there were rather straightforward technical problems to solve, diving into each case study—together with curators and the artist or their representatives—revealed a more complex set of issues. Using Arduinos allowed for a quick change of settings and their comparison brought new facets of the works to light. With contemporary devices like these various hardware emulations are possible. Arduinos in particular have the potential to replace legacy controllers used in sequenced media artworks that have since become obsolete or difficult to source. By introducing Arduinos to a wider audience other possible applications for conservation may be revealed, leading to further research on this innovative device.

Speaker(s)
avatar for Martina Haidvogl

Martina Haidvogl

Associate Media Conservator, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art
Martina Haidvogl is the Associate Media Conservator at SFMOMA, where she has piloted documentation and preservation initiatives for the Media Arts collection since 2011. Martina has lectured and published internationally on media conservation and its implications for museum collections... Read More →

Co-Author(s)
avatar for Sasha Dobbs

Sasha Dobbs

Exhibitions Technical Assistant, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art
Sasha Dobbs is an Exhibitions Technical Assistant at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, where she installs and supports media-based artworks. Her freelance work includes consultation with artists and curators for audio-visual and interactive elements, troubleshooting and repair... Read More →

Wednesday May 31, 2017 11:00am - 11:30am
Comiskey Concourse Level, West Tower

11:00am

(Objects) An evaluation of cold paste waxes used in conservation for outdoor bronze sculpture.
The J. Paul Getty Museum has experimented with different paste wax coatings over the past decade for the protection of outdoor bronze sculptures. Various commercial waxes have been used with noticeable changes in their performance over the years. A preferred home-made mixture was developed, starting with a blend developed by the National Park Service, and modified to raise the melting point, substituting solvents, and subtraction of the polyethylene component. Evaluating the tactic of fine-tuning a custom blend has turned into a more systematic evaluation of the pros and cons of proprietary products, lab-made paste waxes, and varying application techniques. This paper will present a candid summary of observations made in the performance of various wax coatings used on the Museum's collection and introduce a pilot study that compares over twenty-three paste waxes applied to metal coupons.
In collaboration with the Getty Conservation Institute, the study includes a range of isolated wax types (natural, petroleum-based and synthetic), proprietary products, as well as lab-made paste waxes. The waxes were brush-applied cold to polished brass coupons, buffed, and naturally aged following ASTM standard protocol G50-10. The coupons were evaluated before and after aging using spot colorimetry and digital image analysis. The physical properties of the pastes and the effects of aging were characterized using direct melting point determination, acid value assay, solubility testing, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Given the expectation that waxes perform differently depending on application, preliminary results for cold application have nonetheless provided some useful comparisons between the various coatings.   

Speaker(s)
avatar for Julie Wolfe-[PA]

Julie Wolfe-[PA]

Conservator, The J. Paul Getty Museum
Julie Wolfe has an M.A. from Buffalo State College specializing in objects conservation. She obtained advanced training in conservation at the Straus Center for Conservation, Harvard University Art Museums. Julie is now a Conservator at the J. Paul Getty Museum in Decorative Arts... Read More →

Co-Author(s)
avatar for Alessa Gambardella

Alessa Gambardella

Professor, University of Amsterdam
avatar for Rosie Grayburn

Rosie Grayburn

Postdoctoral Fellow in Conservation Science, Getty Conservation Insitute
Rosie Grayburn is a Postdoctoral Fellow in Conservation Science (2015–2017). She obtained a joint PhD from the University of Warwick (Physics) and Universiteit Gent (Analytical Chemistry), where her research focused on developing synchrotron spectroelectrochemical techniques for... Read More →
avatar for Arlen Heginbotham

Arlen Heginbotham

Conservator of Decorative Arts and Sculpture, J. Paul Getty Museum
Arlen Heginbotham received his A.B. in East Asian Studies from Stanford University and his M.A. in Art Conservation from Buffalo State College. He is currently Conservator of Decorative Arts and Sculpture at the J. Paul Getty Museum. Arlen’s research interests include the history... Read More →
avatar for Herant Khanjian

Herant Khanjian

Assistant Scientist, Getty Conservation Institute
Herant Khanjian received his undergraduate degree in chemistry from California State University, Northridge and has been a member in the Science department of the Getty Conservation Institute since 1988. His research interests involve the detection and identification of organic media... Read More →
avatar for Joy Mazurek

Joy Mazurek

Assistant Scientist, Getty Conservation Institute
Joy Mazurek specializes in the identification and characterization of natural and synthetic organic materials by a number of analytical techniques including gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and ion chromatography. She also works on the classification of biomarkers produced by... Read More →
avatar for Alan Phenix-[PA]

Alan Phenix-[PA]

Paintings Conservator; Scientist
Alan Phenix is a paintings conservator, conservation educator and conservation scientist. Recently retired, from November 2006 he was employed as ‘Scientist’ at the Getty Conservation Institute (GCI), Los Angeles. In his first years at GCI he worked partly for the Museum Research... Read More →
avatar for Katrina Posner

Katrina Posner

Netherlands Institute for Conservation Art and Science
Katrina Posner is an objects conservator with 20 years experience in the fine art of looking at, within and around art and artifacts. She has worked with museums in San Francisco, Los Angeles, Brooklyn, Leiden and Amsterdam. Before moving with her family to Amsterdam in 2013, she... Read More →
avatar for Michael R. Schilling

Michael R. Schilling

Senior Scientist, Yale Institute for the Preservation of Cultural Heritage
Michael Schilling is head of Materials Characterization research at the Getty Conservation Institute, which focuses on development of analytical methods for studying classes of materials used by artists and conservators. He specializes in gas chromatography, mass spectrometry and... Read More →
avatar for Christina L. Simms

Christina L. Simms

Sculpture and Object Conservator and Assistant Project Manager, McKay Lodge Conservation Laboratory, Inc.
Christina L . Simms is currently the Assistant Project Manager and Conservator of Objects and Sculpture at McKay Lodge Fine Arts Conservation Laboratory, Inc. The company offers services for paper, objects, sculpture, and paintings conservation. It also currently holds the General... Read More →
avatar for Magdalena Solano

Magdalena Solano

Conservation Assistant, J. Paul Getty Museum
avatar for Maria Olivia Davalos Stanton

Maria Olivia Davalos Stanton

Intern, Getty Conservation Institute
A pre-program student, Maria Olivia is currently pursuing a bachelor's degree in Classics with a minor in Chemistry at Stanford University. She was a 2015 summer intern in the Department of Decorative Arts and Sculpture Conservation at the J Paul Getty Museum, and has since worked... Read More →
HW

Hope Welder

Intern, Getty Conservation Institute

Wednesday May 31, 2017 11:00am - 11:30am
Crystal Ballroom B Lobby Level, West Tower

11:00am

(Photographic Materials) Providing Access to ‘Overprotected’ Color Slides
Arnold Newman (1918–2006) is considered the father of the environmental portrait and one of the most influential photographers of the 20th Century. He published numerous books and his photographs were frequently published in magazines such as LIFE, Time, Scientific American, Vanity Fair, Harper's Bazaar, The New Yorker, among many others. His work is part of major museums and private collections within the United States and around the world. In 2006, the Harry Ransom Center, University of Texas at Austin, acquired Newman's archive. Composed by 307,923 items, the archive contains negatives, color transparencies, original contact sheets, a selection of more than 2,000 prints, Newman's original "sittings” or appointment books, business files, correspondence, early sketchbooks, photographic albums, video recordings of interviews and lectures, among others. During the cataloging process several conservation challenges were brought to light. One of them: 16 sets of Kodachrome color transparencies, with a total of 117 individual transparencies, were wrapped with three different pressure sensitive tapes, and apparently randomly labeled. This configuration blocked the access to the images and represented a conservation problem since the tapes were in direct contact with film supports and emulsion layers. Tests were performed to find the safest way to remove tapes and adhesive residues. Paper conservation techniques were, once again, successfully applied in the conservation of photographs, in this case with plastic supports and color dyes as the image–forming material. Conservation treatments allowed access to the image content, thus enabling completion of cataloging process and pairing the slide label information with Newman's cataloging system, and ultimately allowing access of his entire archive to scholars and researchers interested in his creative process.

Speaker(s)
avatar for Diana L. Diaz Cañas

Diana L. Diaz Cañas

Senior Conservator of Photographs, Harry Ransom Center
Diana Diaz is Conservator of Photographs at the Harry Ransom Center, University of Texas at Austin. Diana has post-graduate degree in Conservation of Photographs from the National School for Conservation (ENCRyM) in Mexico City, and a Bachelor degree in Conservation from the Universidad... Read More →


Wednesday May 31, 2017 11:00am - 11:30am
Michigan 1A-B Concourse Level, East Tower

11:00am

(Textiles) A Worthwhile Endeavor: The Conservation of a Worth and Bobergh Ensemble
During a time when clothing was a costly commodity, restyling, resizing, and re-purposing garments to accommodate changing fashions and bodies were common practices. Such well-worn items of dress are a common feature of museum collections and pose a number of treatment challenges to the conservators who care for them. A circa 1870 Worth and Bobergh ensemble in the collection of the Museum of Fine Arts Boston is a prime example: the evening/day bodices and skirt had each undergone multiple generations of alterations by the time the ensemble was acquired by the museum in 2002. Over the course of a year-long Mellon Fellowship in the MFA's Textile Conservation Lab, the author undertook extensive conservation of this ensemble in preparation for its inclusion in a 2017 touring exhibition entitled La Parisienne. The ensemble's silk faille fabric suffered from numerous condition issues requiring myriad conservation treatments, the successes and challenges of which will be discussed in this presentation. Losses necessitated custom-dyed materials to compensate for parts of the skirt that had been cut away. Two different dyeing procedures were used to approximate the early synthetic purple of the garments' primary fabric and the off-white tint of the contrasting patterned fabric. A large stain on the front of the skirt in a section of the patterned fabric further involved generating a digitally printed reproduction of the pattern to mask the stain for exhibition. Heavy creasing throughout the fabric and trimmings required multiple humidification treatments using both water vapor and steam. Splits and tears in weakened areas of ruffle and lace trimmings had to be stabilized with both stitch- and adhesive-based repairs. The scope of these treatments provided the author with the opportunity to experience and compare the implementation and efficacy of different conservation techniques. In addition to the fabric damage wrought by wear and aging, changes made to the construction of the garments also had to be addressed in this treatment. Inexpertly worked alterations drastically changed the silhouette of the skirt and, by permanently joining the skirt to the evening bodice, made it impossible to dress it interchangeably with either day or evening bodice as has been originally intended. Returning the skirt closer to its original configuration involved a study of Worth and Bobergh construction methods seen in other extant examples, an in-depth analysis of evidence remaining in the skirt itself, and the construction of a half-scale mock-up based on the garment's conjectured configuration. The early alterations made to the ensemble to keep current with fashions during the transitional period of the late 1860s and early 1870s also had to be carefully considered when determining the best approach to its treatment and display. This treatment involved a wide-ranging approach that drew from both 21st-century conservation methods and 19th-century dressmaking techniques, exemplifying the breadth of knowledge and skill that is often called upon in costume conservation.

Speaker(s)
avatar for Johanna Tower

Johanna Tower

Assistant Conservator of Costume and Textiles, Windsor Conservation
Johanna Tower was the Andrew W. Mellon Fellow for Advanced Training in Textile Conservation at the Museum of Fine Arts Boston from November 2015 to November 2016. She received her Master of Science degree in 2015 from the University of Rhode Island's Department of Textiles, Fashion... Read More →


Wednesday May 31, 2017 11:00am - 11:30am
Crystal Ballroom C Lobby Level, West Tower

11:00am

(Sustainability) Tips Session
Wednesday May 31, 2017 11:00am - 12:00pm
Plaza Ballroom Lobby Level, East Tower

11:00am

(Wooden Artifacts) Business Meeting
Wednesday May 31, 2017 11:00am - 12:00pm
Acapulco Ballroom Level, West Tower

11:30am

(Architecture) Beyond Treatment: Monitoring before during and after conservation of the mural, América Tropical, by David Alfaro Siqueiros, 1932
América Tropical was painted by renowned artist David Alfaro Siqueiros in 1932 on the second story exterior wall of the historic Italian Hall, located in El Pueblo Historic Monument in downtown Los Angeles, and is the only mural painted by Siqueiros in the U.S. which remains in situ today. Measuring approximately 18 x 80 feet, América Tropical depicts a Mexican Indian, crucified on a double cross beneath an American eagle. Two sharpshooters are taking aim at the eagle from a nearby rooftop. Given the significance of the mural and its conservation problems, in 1988 the Getty Conservation Institute (GCI) entered into a collaborative partnership with El Pueblo de Los Angeles Historical Monument, a department of the City of Los Angeles, to conserve, protect and interpret the mural, and provide public access to view it. In the years that followed, the GCI measured environmental conditions, analyzed the paint and plaster, performed conservation treatment, and digitally documented condition and treatment; while the City of Los Angeles built a protective shelter, viewing platform, and interpretive center. These combined activities aimed to preserve and present the mural in its historic and artistic context. The project was completed in 2012. As part of the conservation component, the GCI committed to carry out post-treatment monitoring for ten years. Over the course of the project, a variety of monitoring techniques were used to understand conditions, follow construction activities, and track changes following treatment. This presentation will discuss the monitoring carried out at each phase of the project, and elaborate on the objectives, techniques, and results achieved. The monitoring activities include environmental monitoring; monitoring of condition before treatment; monitoring of construction activities using a time-lapse camera while the protective shelter was being constructed; and post-treatment monitoring based on a comprehensive monitoring plan developed by the project team to ensure the long-term preservation of the mural and the site. The objective of post-treatment monitoring is to detect and address any change to the condition of the mural, the integrated window shutters and door, the shelter, viewing platform, and surrounding environment, then report this information to the General Manager of El Pueblo de Los Angeles Historical Monument, who is responsible for the maintenance and presentation of the site. The different methods of monitoring each had a specific objective, and were relatively low-cost and easily implemented. They provided valuable information needed at each stage of the work to inform planning and decision-making. Going forward, the monitoring procedures put into place will continue to aid the understanding of the efficacy of current maintenance and management procedures, the conservation treatment, and performance of the shelter. While not all mural conservation projects may carry out monitoring to this degree, the methods used can be easily adapted for use on other sites with similar issues.

Speaker(s)
avatar for Leslie Rainer, [PA]

Leslie Rainer, [PA]

Wall Paintings Conservator, Senior Project Specialist, Getty Conservation Institute
Leslie Rainer is a wall paintings conservator and senior project specialist at the Getty Conservation Institute. She has been involved in the conservation of wall paintings on projects in the US, France, Italy, West Africa, China, Mexico, Guatemala and Peru. She is currently project... Read More →

Co-Author(s)
avatar for Kiernan Graves

Kiernan Graves

Wall Painting Conservator, Getty Conservation Institute
Kiernan Graves graduated from the Courtauld Institute of Art with a master's degree in the conservation of wall paintings. She spent the first part of her career in private practice working on a range of UNESCO World Heritage Sites. In the United States, her professional collaborations... Read More →

Wednesday May 31, 2017 11:30am - 12:00pm
Crystal Ballroom A Lobby Level, West Tower

11:30am

(Book & Paper + Research & Technical Studies) - Characterization of Aniline Dyes in Colored Papers of Jose Posada’s Prints Using (ToF-SIMS)...
Characterization of the Aniline Dyes in the Colored Papers of Jose Posada's Prints Using Time of Flight-Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) to Aid in Developing a Treatment Protocol for the Removal of Oxidized Tape

Jose Guadalupe Posada (1852-1913) was a prolific and influential Mexican printmaker; he produced thousands of images printed on a variety of poor-quality papers, often colored with vibrant but fugitive aniline dyes. The Amon Carter Museum of American Art has a large collection of approximately 400 prints attributed to Posada, many of which retain their bright color. A number of these are unstable due to oxidized pressure-sensitive tape residue, penetrating and weakening the short-fibered paper. In addition, aniline dyes are sensitive to solvents, complicating treatment.
Because aniline dyes have varying sensitivities to different solvents it is necessary to characterize them before an appropriate treatment protocol can be developed. A previous study of Posada's prints identified several aniline dyes using Fourier Transform (FT)-Raman spectroscopy. Of these, the yellow dyes could not be fully characterized. In this study, time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF SIMS) was used to discern the dyes present in the colored papers with particular focus on the yellow dyes.
TOF SIMS is a valuable analytical technique for the identification of organic and inorganic components. Its high sensitivity and small sample size requirements make it potentially useful for the analysis of dyes and works on paper. For this study a selection of Posada's prints in various colors from the Amon Carter's collection were examined using TOF SIMS. Preliminary analysis has produced significant data for all the dyes analyzed. FT-Raman analysis was also conducted on these prints to verify the results.
As part of developing a treatment protocol for the Posada prints, an experiment was set up using artificially aged paper and tapes to simulate the removal of oxidized tape from fragile dyed papers. A variety of methods were employed. Samples were created by applying Scotch MagicTM tape (acetate backing; acrylic adhesive), 3M 2214 paper tape (crepe paper backing; rubber adhesive), gummed brown paper tape (kraft paper backing; starch adhesive), and Slime rubber cement to several c.1900s dyed and undyed broadsides, mimicking the Posada prints. The samples were then ‘treated' with solvent and suction, solvent vapor, solvent through Gore-tex sandwich, and rigid Gellan gum with solvent. The samples were imaged using visible light and Ultra-Violet (UV) before and after treatment, along with spectrophotometer readings to monitor and record any changes in the samples.
Because aniline dyes are prevalent in many turn of the century objects, as are oxidized tapes, developing an effective treatment protocol has tremendous potential benefit.

Speaker(s)
avatar for Stacey Kelly

Stacey Kelly

Paper Conservator, University of UtahnJ. Willard Marriott Library
Stacey M. Kelly is the current paper conservator at the J. Willard Marriott Library at the University of Utah. She has previously held positions at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, and the Amon Carter Museum of American Art. Kelly graduated with an MA in Conservation of Fine Art... Read More →

Co-Author(s)
avatar for Ashley Ellsworth

Ashley Ellsworth

PhD Candidate, University of Texas at Dallas, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry
Ashley Ann Ellsworth graduated with her PhD in Chemistry at the University of Dallas in January 2017. She previously received her bachelors’ degrees in Chemistry and Biology and the University of Texas at Tyler. Her PhD research aimed to develop novel ways to deposit and direct... Read More →
avatar for Jenny K. Hedlund

Jenny K. Hedlund

PhD Candidate, University of Texas at Dallas, Department of Chemistry
Jenny Hedlund earned her B.S. degree in Chemistry from the University of Iowa in 2012. Prior to graduation she held a summer internship position at Argonne National Laboratory in the Center for Nanomaterials. After graduation, she returned to Argonne National Laboratory for an internship... Read More →
avatar for Jodie Utter-[Fellow]

Jodie Utter-[Fellow]

Conservator of Works on Paper, Amon Carter Museum of American Art
Jodie Utter is the conservator of works on paper for the Amon Carter Museum of American Art. She has worked in paper conservation as a technician, contract conservator, sole proprietor, and staff conservator in private practice and in institutions for the past twenty-five years. She... Read More →
avatar for Amy Walker

Amy Walker

Professor, University of Texas at Dallas, Department of Materials Science and Engineering
Amy V. Walker is an Professor of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas. She was previously an Assistant Professor of Chemistry and an inaugural member of the Center for Materials Innovation at Washington University in St. Louis. She holds a B.A. in physics... Read More →

Wednesday May 31, 2017 11:30am - 12:00pm
Regency A-B Ballroom Level, West Tower

11:30am

(Objects) Local Treatment for Outdoor Painted Metal Sculptures: designing Suitable Paints for Retouching
Outdoor painted sculptures are constantly exposed to aggressive environments and therefore highly prone to surface damages. Surface damages are not only disfiguring but will also accelerate degradation mechanisms and in the long-term will lead to invasive and costly repainting campaigns. Local retouching can be an efficient solution to postpone these campaigns when paint losses occur on outdoor painted sculptures, as a temporary measure to restore the aesthetic integrity while preventing further damage to the exposed substrate. Carrying out unnoticeable repairs on flat monochromatic surfaces can be challenging, as is finding materials with the desirable handling properties. A wide range of materials and methods for priming, filling and retouching metal painted surfaces were investigated at the Getty Conservation Institute (GCI). The study builds on previous research, in which primarily industrial paints were tested for retouching. While industrial paints designed for the outdoor are undeniably the more durable option, they are costly, difficult to procure in small quantities, and can be hard to apply and manipulate to obtain the desired appearance (gloss and color). At the GCI, artist's- and conservation paints usually employed indoors were tested instead, since they offer a number of advantages including their ease of handling (i.e., application, manipulation) and their availability in small quantities at low costs. The main focus of the study was to test a number of additives to enhance the longevity of the paints investigated. In consultation with paint manufacturer Golden Artist's Colors these were: Mineral Spirits Acrylics (poly(n-butyl methacrylate)), Fluid Acrylics and Heavy Body Acrylics (both poly(n-butyl acrylate/methyl methacrylate)butyl acrylate). Paraloid B48-N (methyl methacrylate/butyl acrylate) with pigment-pastes was also included. For all paints, a variety of additives were tested, separately and in combination: adhesion promoters, UV-stabilizers and matting agents. A number of paints and additives combinations were custom formulated by Golden for the project. To evaluate the durability of the paints and the influence of the additives, samples with and without additives were prepared and exposed to artificial and natural aging. The natural ageing was performed in collaboration with Dow Chemicals at several of their exposure sites. For both natural and artificial aging, visual changes were recorded and FTIR-, color- and gloss measurements were carried out at regular intervals. To assess the workability of the materials, local treatments were simulated on mock-ups. The mock-ups were exposed outdoors, to observe the long-term durability of the repairs. The data on natural ageing is still being gathered, but the artificial ageing indicated that all manipulated paints would show high outdoor durability; the modified Mineral Spirits Acrylics showed especially promising results. From a practical perspective Fluid Acrylics were the best performers: they are easy to handle, have high hiding-power and can be applied with an airbrush, allowing for almost invisible touch-ups. The research provides technical and practical information of a broad range of materials for local treatment. If natural ageing confirms the positive outcomes of artificial aging than a possible application of the study could be to make the paint formulas commercially available to the conservation field.

Speaker(s)
avatar for Nikki van Basten

Nikki van Basten

Private Practice
Nikki van Basten is a conservator of modern and contemporary art. She completed a Professional Doctorate in Conservation and Restoration (PDRes) at the University of Amsterdam in 2015. Nikki worked as a specialist at the Getty Conservation Institute (GCI) and carried out treatments... Read More →

Co-Author(s)
avatar for Ulysses Jackson

Ulysses Jackson

Formulator, Golden Artist Colors, Inc.
avatar for Rachel Rivenc

Rachel Rivenc

Associate Scientist, Getty Conservation Institute
Rachel Rivenc has been working within the Modern and Contemporary Art Research Initiative at the GCI since 2006. She is currently an associate scientist. She studies the diverse materials and techniques used by contemporary artists, and their conservation. She is currently leading... Read More →

Wednesday May 31, 2017 11:30am - 12:00pm
Crystal Ballroom B Lobby Level, West Tower

11:30am

(Textiles) A Treatment Returns Undone
Often treatments do not go as planned. Well thought out treatment proposals often need a small or sometimes a large change of plan as the work unfolds. We do our best and the outcome is usually successful. Completion of a treatment for conservators in private practice includes instructing the client on how to care the object, and then it's out of our hands. Occasionally, the intended treatment does not go as planned due to the actions of the object's owners. This was the case of an Onodagah/Iraqis feathered headdress I treated 17 years ago. The ceremonial headdress was made and presented to the owner's grandfather in 1930 in honor of his friendship and service to the tribe. The headdress, a man's felt hat decorated with 28 eagle feathers and beadwork, was in poor condition. The hat was fragile and many of the feathers were detached. The headdress was covered in dust and there was extensive loss of feathers due to insect damage. The family admitted that the headdress had never been protected and confessed that it had often been worn for the carving of the turkey at Thanksgiving. The treatment included surface vacuuming, cleaning and stabilizing the beadwork, reattaching feathers to the hat and constructing a solid interior mount for support, The interior mount was also attached to a solid baseboard to help support the lower feathers. The owners picked it up and promised to protect it in an exhibit case. In 2016 I received a referral through the University of Pennsylvania Museum about treating a ceremonial feathered headdress. It was the same headdress, and now it was in very poor condition. The hat was more fragile, and more feathers were detached. The headdress was again covered in dust and there was more loss of feathers due to insect damage. Also, part of the mount was missing. The owner's were extremely embarrassed and were determined to have the headdress conserved and properly protected. A new treatment was devised to attach the feathers through the hat into a solid interior mount for stabilization. This treatment did not go as planned. The owners felt that attaching the headdress to the solid mount would make it a sculpture. They wanted the headdress to be removable from the solid mount in keeping with it's original intent. Eventually a compromise was reached that satisfied both conservator and clients. The owners have built a glass front bookcase to protect the headdress. As they wisely said, "We can't do this again”.

Speaker(s)
NL

Nancy Love, [PA]

Owner, Philadelphia Textile Conservation
Nancy Love is the owner of Philadelphia Textile Conservation. She specializes in historic and ethnographic textiles and costumes. She is a Professional Associate of the AIC and a member of the Philadelphia Art Conservation Association. Nancy received her Masters of Art Conservation... Read More →


Wednesday May 31, 2017 11:30am - 12:00pm
Crystal Ballroom C Lobby Level, West Tower

11:30am

(Photographic Materials) Business Meeting
Wednesday May 31, 2017 11:30am - 12:00pm
Michigan 1A-B Concourse Level, East Tower

11:30am

(Electronic Media) Demonstration & Discussion: Open Source Hardware and Media Conservation
With an eye toward time-based media conservation uses, Mark Hellar
(Mark Hellar Studios) and Sasha Dobbs (SFMOMA)  will showcase some
examples of microcontrollers such as Arduino, Raspberry Pi, and
Beaglebone as implemented in an art-making and conservation context.
They will discuss these tools' wide-ranging capabilities, a few case
examples, and review best practices for documentation when utilizing
these systems.

Speaker(s)
avatar for Sasha Dobbs

Sasha Dobbs

Exhibitions Technical Assistant, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art
Sasha Dobbs is an Exhibitions Technical Assistant at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, where she installs and supports media-based artworks. Her freelance work includes consultation with artists and curators for audio-visual and interactive elements, troubleshooting and repair... Read More →
avatar for Mark Hellar

Mark Hellar

Arts Professional, Hellar Studios
Mark Hellar is a leading technology consultant for cultural institutions throughout the San Francisco Bay Area and beyond and owner of Hellar Studios LLC. Mark is currently working on new media conservation initiatives at SFMoMA, including the conservation and care of their software-based... Read More →


Wednesday May 31, 2017 11:30am - 12:30pm
Comiskey Concourse Level, West Tower

11:30am

(Paintings) Business Meeting
Moderator(s)
avatar for Noelle Ocon-[PA]

Noelle Ocon-[PA]

Conservator, North Carolina Museum of Art Foundation
Noelle Ocon has served as the conservator of paintings at the North Carolina Museum of Art since 1997. Ocon’s focus is on the examination, documentation and conservation of the 17th century Dutch and Flemish collection, as well as the implementation of technology, including infrared... Read More →

Wednesday May 31, 2017 11:30am - 12:30pm
Regency C Ballroom Level, West Tower

12:00pm

(Health and Safety) Asbestos Safety and Current Practices in Cultural Properties Lunch
The treatment and handling of materials containing, or contaminated with, asbestos is a complicated issue for collection care professionals. Poor handling can result in health risks and regulatory problems. Ensuring safe access, display and installation of these collections requires proper protective equipment, training, engineering controls, isolation, and labeling. For conservators, questions about identification methods and safe work protocols will depend upon intended use, installation requirements, storage conditions, and how the proposed work has been classified according to federal and state regulations. Collaboration with health and safety experts is critical to each of the following steps: material testing, exposure monitoring to develop adequate controls per OSHA and EPA, receiving the correct level of regulatory training and medical certifications, and protecting collections during contracted abatement.

Health and safety professionals from the Art Institute of Chicago and Environmental Analysis, Inc., will provide examples of asbestos-containing building and collection materials, offer resources for certified contractors to conduct testing and abatement, and describe the questions you should be asking.  Advice will be given on how to prepare for collection storage and work area restrictions during asbestos removal activities. Presenters will also discuss the levels of OSHA training, engineering controls and best practices required to prevent asbestos exposures, as well as where to find EPA-accredited training providers.
Conservators experienced in working with asbestos-related collections will present case studies involving consolidation, isolation and decontamination, along with discussion on the complexities involved in making decisions about the right treatment and safety protocols for handling objects that are made from asbestos-containing materials.

A plated lunch will be served.

Cost: $39

Speaker(s)
avatar for Peter Dennis

Peter Dennis

Vice President of Operations, Environmental Analysis, Inc.
Peter Dennis is currently the Vice President of Operations for Environmental Analysis Inc. Mr. Dennis has more than 27 years of diversified environmental management experience, including environmental planning, resource management, staff scheduling, project management, building inspections... Read More →
avatar for Lisa Goldberg

Lisa Goldberg

Conservator, Goldberg Preservation Services, LLC
Project leader for STASH, AIC News Editor and conservator in private practice. Lisa Goldberg is a private conservator with a focus on preventive care as well as health and safety issues. She is a member of SPNHC and AAM, and is a Professional  Associate of AIC. As long time editor... Read More →
avatar for Kathryn Makos

Kathryn Makos

Industrial Hygienist (Retired), Smithsonian Institution (Ret.)
Kathryn Makos, Certified Industrial Hygienist, Masters of Public Health (University of IL), retired (2013) from the Smithsonian Institution's Office of Safety, Health and Environmental Management, where she was responsible for developing industrial hygiene programs and conducting... Read More →
avatar for Sara Munoz-Abramowicz

Sara Munoz-Abramowicz

President and CEO, Environmental Analysis, Inc.
Sara Munoz-Abramowicz is President and CEO of Environmental Analysis Inc. (EAI), Mrs. Munoz-Abramowicz has a staff of more than ten specialists, which include, Industrial Hygienists, Lead Designers, Inspectors and Project Managers. After more than 22 years in the environmental consulting... Read More →
avatar for Margaret Skimina

Margaret Skimina

Associate Director for Environmental Health, Safety, and Fire Protection, Art Institute of Chicago
Margaret Skimina, Certified Safety Professional and Certified Environmental Trainer, 18 years as Associate Director for Environmental Health, Safety, and Fire Protection with the Art Institute of Chicago’s Office of Museum Facilities’ Department where she is responsible for developing... Read More →
avatar for Lisa Young

Lisa Young

Supervisory Conservator, Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum
Lisa Young has served as objects conservator at the National Air and Space Museum since 2009. She earned her B.Sc. in Conservation at the University of Wales, Cardiff. She has worked at NASM since 1997, where she researched the preservation of spacesuits. From 1999-2006 she was the... Read More →

Sponsors
avatar for Atlas Preservation Inc.

Atlas Preservation Inc.

Atlas Preservation
Atlas Preservation was conceived based on the need for a one stop source for all monument restoration supplies. Our mission quickly expanded to include many other fields relating to conservation & historic preservation. such as products for metal conservation, historic window repair... Read More →



Wednesday May 31, 2017 12:00pm - 2:00pm
Water Tower Concourse Level, West Tower

12:00pm

JAIC Editorial Board Meeting
By invitation only.

Wednesday May 31, 2017 12:00pm - 2:00pm
Wrigley Concourse Level, West Tower

12:15pm

Sacred Spaces Walk
Limited Capacity full

What better way to recharge during a lunch break than to take a tour downtown Chicago striking and architecturally significant houses of worship. Visit several of these sites, including "the tallest church in the world"—a skyscraper building specifically designed for multiple functions including worship and commercial office space. We will see both spaces that were built specifically for the groups that use them and others, former office buildings and private clubs that have been re-purposed. Be surprised by the interiors we will enter, including one with an enormous expanse of stained glass and another with an intimate chapel for the Loop's burgeoning student population.

While you can't eat in the churches, you can bring food and drink in a purse or tote bag and nibble as you walk. A lunch break for both body and soul. Cost = $25


1:00pm

(Archaeological Conservation) Discussion Group Business Meeting
The ADG Business Meeting is open to all Annual Meeting attendees with an interest in archaeological conservation. Topics that will be discussed at the meeting include the progress of the ADG's goals and future activities. 


Moderator(s)
avatar for Molly C. Gleeson, [PA]

Molly C. Gleeson, [PA]

Schwartz Project Conservator, Penn Museum
Molly Gleeson is the Schwartz Project Conservator at the Penn Museum. Since 2012 Molly has worked in the museum’s open conservation lab, which was recently renamed “The Artifact Lab: Conservation in Action.” In the Artifact Lab, she treats artifacts in full public view, interacts... Read More →

Wednesday May 31, 2017 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Gold Coast Concourse Level, West Tower

2:00pm

Introduction of Sessions by Moderators 2
Speaker(s)
avatar for Margaret Holben Ellis, [Fellow]

Margaret Holben Ellis, [Fellow]

Eugene Thaw Professor of Paper Conservation, NYU Institute of Fine Arts
Margaret Holben Ellis received her Bachelor’s Degree in Art History from Barnard College, Columbia University (1975) and completed her Master’s Degree in Art History and Advanced Certificate in Conservation at the Institute of Fine Arts, New York University (1979). In... Read More →
avatar for Patricia Silence, [PA]

Patricia Silence, [PA]

Director of Preventive Conservation, Colonial Williamsburg Foundation
Patricia Silence is Director of Preventive Conservation at the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation, where she manages an extensive preventive conservation program. Patty manages the IPM program, working closely with a dedicated technician as well as specialists in architecture, landscape... Read More →
avatar for Suzanne Davis-[Fellow]

Suzanne Davis-[Fellow]

Curator and Head of Conservation, Kelsey Museum of Archaeology, University of Michigan
Suzanne Davis is an associate curator and the head of conservation at the University of Michigan's Kelsey Museum of Archaeology. Prior to joining the Museum in 2001, she was a conservator for the Underwater Archaeology Branch of the Naval Historical Center in Washington, D.C. She... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Corina E. Rogge-[PA]

Dr. Corina E. Rogge-[PA]

Andrew W. Mellon Research Scientist, The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston
Corina E. Rogge is the Andrew W. Mellon Research Scientist at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston and the Menil Collection. She earned a B.A. in chemistry from Bryn Mawr College, a Ph.D. in Chemistry from Yale University and held postdoctoral positions at the University of Wisconsin-Madison... Read More →


Wednesday May 31, 2017 2:00pm - 2:05pm
Hyatt Regency Chicago 151 East Wacker Drive, Chicago, Illinois 60601

2:05pm

(Beyond Treatment) What's so ethical about doing nothing?
This conference is a celebration of the importance of treatment and of the necessary intellectual preparation for action. In the description of the conference theme the ‘no treatment at all' option is referred to as ‘the ultimate decision'. Yet there seems to be a growing trend within the conservation profession for ‘no treatment at all' to be considered the one and only ethical choice.

There are several reasons for this trend. One of the causes concerns social and academic attitudes to working with the hands. The academic professionalization of conservation can aggravate the prejudice that intellectual skills are more desirable and laudable than manual dexterity. Most conservation treatments demand both types of skill in equal measure. Yet if time is not allowed in school and college for the development of manual ability, practical intervention tasks will not be carried out with the necessary speed and skill. This may lead to mistakes and irreversible damage to artifacts. This leads to a process of ethical drift where certain treatments are deemed unethical rather than just difficult, downright wrong rather than requiring skill and experience.

College conservation courses fill their curricula with more and more non-practical content. Specialist conservators in large institutions fill their time with administration and with short-term activities such as loans, ostensibly to reduce immediate risk. They engage with storage projects with long-term aims of preservation and risk reduction. Conservators in smaller museums cannot hope to specialize. This leads to the development of members of the conservation profession who have not learned, and do not desire, to carry out interventive treatments.

Arguments that preventive conservation is more economical and less risky than intervention seem to generate unwarranted attitudes of moral superiority that can fuel the ethical drift. This drift means that treatment options that were considered perfectly allowable become at first questionable and then unethical. This is excused as the necessary progress of a developing profession. In extreme cases the supremacy of the ‘no treatment at all 'policy could be construed as ‘depraved indifference' to the aesthetic and educational potential of individual objects.

There is a concurrent trend in the wording of codes of conduct and ethics that no longer include explicit guidance about practical intervention. The limits of intervention are blurred, yet conservators continue to act as though they were following unequivocal and universally acknowledged guidelines. Sensible elegant solutions to problems are deemed to be both sensible and elegant but ‘not what a conservator would do'.

This presentation will provide evidence of this trend and discuss the limits of arguments about the safety and economy of doing nothing. A process will be proposed that will promote discussion of the full range of options and allow the construction of explicit policies for interventive treatments. These will be locally determined and locally relevant. Any national or international body attempting to regulate conservation practice need only insist that this policy has been discussed, locally approved and made universally accessible.

Speaker(s)
avatar for Jonathan Ashley-Smith

Jonathan Ashley-Smith

Head of Conservation (Retired), Victoria and Albert Museum
Jonathan trained in chemistry to post-doctoral level, worked as a metalwork conservation apprentice and then, from 1977 to 2002, was Head of the Conservation Department at the Victoria and Albert Museum, London. The book ' Risk Assessment for Object Conservation', now sorely in need... Read More →


Wednesday May 31, 2017 2:05pm - 2:30pm
Regency A-B Ballroom Level, West Tower

2:05pm

(Treatment: Don't Go it alone) Unraveling the past to inform the present: conservation of Egyptian Mummies at the Penn Museum
Central to the collections of the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology (Penn Museum) is the Egyptian collection, which is one of the largest collections of Egyptian and Nubian material in the United States. Housing approximately 50,000 individual objects, the collection was assembled over nearly a century, beginning with purchases and gifts but mostly through excavations led or sponsored by the Museum. Included in the Egyptian collection are the mummified human remains of multiple individuals, spanning the whole of ancient Egyptian history. These mummies, while representing just a fraction of the Penn Museum's extensive collection, continue to be one of the biggest visitor attractions and many have been on display for decades. Over the last four years, there has been a concerted effort to address conservation needs for the Egyptian mummies in the collection, thanks to the Penn Museum's public conservation lab, "In the Artifact Lab: Conserving Egyptian Mummies.” Opened in 2012, the lab was set up in a gallery, which provided the necessary space to conserve the mummies and was also an exhibition in its own right. This configuration has allowed the mummies to remain on view while undergoing conservation treatment, and the work includes daily public outreach which has heightened awareness of the museum's collection and the field of conservation. Before this project, the most recent conservation and in-depth examination of mummies was carried out in 1980 in preparation for the exhibition: "The Egyptian Mummy: Secrets and Science.” While treatment records and photography exist from this time period for most of the mummies in the gallery, they are brief and often lack details about decision-making processes or materials testing. Prior to this exhibition, it is evident that the mummies were worked on but there are minimal records of these interventions, including the autopsy of four mummies in the early 1970s. In many cases, the same repairs have been observed on multiple mummies and on objects in the Egyptian collection, which may be associated with preparation for their display in the museum in the 1930s. This implies that there was a consistent treatment approach, even though few treatment records exist. In an effort to establish best practices and suitable treatment protocols for the mummies, Penn Museum conservators, along with curators and collections staff, have spent the last several years reconstructing the histories of these mummies through careful examination, scientific analysis, and research into their excavation records, collection circumstances, exhibition, and past treatment. Lacking formal guidelines for the treatment of mummies, the conservators developed a standard approach to treating mummies in the collection, informed by the way these mummies have been displayed and treated in the past, and building on methods developed by colleagues in the field. This, combined with the public outreach efforts, is changing the way both colleagues and the public perceive and interact with the mummies and the larger collection.

Speaker(s)
avatar for Molly C. Gleeson, [PA]

Molly C. Gleeson, [PA]

Schwartz Project Conservator, Penn Museum
Molly Gleeson is the Schwartz Project Conservator at the Penn Museum. Since 2012 Molly has worked in the museum’s open conservation lab, which was recently renamed “The Artifact Lab: Conservation in Action.” In the Artifact Lab, she treats artifacts in full public view, interacts... Read More →

Co-Author(s)
avatar for Alexis North

Alexis North

Project Conservator, Penn Museum
Alexis North is the Williams Project Conservator at the Penn Museum, currently working on the Museum's renovation of their Mexico and Central America gallery. She is a graduate of the UCLA/Getty Conservation Program, and has worked at the Brooklyn Museum, the Michael C. Carlos Museum... Read More →

Wednesday May 31, 2017 2:05pm - 2:30pm
Regency C-D Ballroom Level, West Tower

2:05pm

(Treatment: Going Big) Go Big or Go Home: Broader Considerations in the Treatment of Oversize Objects at the Art Institute of Chicago
Whether in the private sector or within institutions, conservators seem to be under increasingly urgent and constant pressure. Exhibition schedules and treatment deadlines are drawing ever tighter with ever-fewer resources—both material and personnel—allocated to satisfy these demands. At times, certainly, realizing even a minimum level of treatment feels like an impossibility. Over the past several years, various initiatives at the Art Institute of Chicago have necessitated major re-treatments of several oversize works of art: a pair of 17th-century Islamic tile spandrels; a Renaissance terracotta altarpiece; and a Classical Greek marble funerary monument. The treatments themselves were of considerable interest, requiring investigation into new materials and techniques; exploiting trusted materials from the conservator's arsenal but utilizing them in novel ways; and demanding ample bench skills. These aspects of each treatment will be discussed. However, the more salient theme that the three campaigns will highlight is the degree to which the treatment design for each object went beyond the strictures mandated by the profession (i.e., retreatability, minimal intervention, etc.) and incorporated the broader exigencies of numerous staff members outside of conservation. For instance, a specific goal of each treatment was to ensure that installation be as straightforward and expedient as possible. A further goal was to reduce the object's footprint within available storage space in the event of its being taken off view. Not least, the treatment design incorporated sound shortcuts to accommodate the project deadlines as closely as possible. These and other goals will be enumerated in greater length to reinforce the notion that it behooves conservators to think beyond the bench and tailor treatment designs to dovetail neatly with the needs of clients or the institution as a whole. In the face of dwindling budgets and burgeoning administrative hurdles it makes increasing sense to function as collaborative partners with a full understanding of how conservation fits into the bigger picture. At the same time, the three objects serve as good case studies for discussion as to the extent of treatment and when it is critical to insist on wholesale re-treatment. The reservoir of goodwill that builds from a track record of problem solving, not just for the benefit of the objects in our care, but on behalf of the many other members of staff whose work may appear tangential but is nonetheless allied with our own, makes it easier to hold the line and push for those treatments which might not otherwise have full support or the luxury of undivided attention. 

Speaker(s)
avatar for Rachel C. Sabino-[PA]

Rachel C. Sabino-[PA]

Associate Conservator of Objects, Art Institute of Chicago
RACHEL C. SABINO has been Associate Conservator of Objects at the Art Institute of Chicago since 2011 where, in addition to treatment-related activities, she has been a co-author of the museum's online scholarly catalogue of Roman art. Rachel held previous positions at the National... Read More →


Wednesday May 31, 2017 2:05pm - 2:30pm
Crystal Ballroom A Lobby Level, West Tower

2:05pm

(Unique Objects/Unique Treatment) The 40 year conservation story of Bruce Conner’s CHILD
Bruce Conner's CHILD was created in 1959 as a response to the sentencing of death-row inmate Caryl Chessman who had been incarcerated for the kidnapping and sexual molestation of a woman in Los Angeles. Conner responded to this high-profile capital punishment case and his visceral repulsion to it by creating a frightening sculpture of a deformed corpse-like child. Made from casting wax, the figure appears strapped to a wooden highchair with belt and twine, the head tilted backwards with a gaping or screaming mouth, and body veiled in torn and stretched nylon stockings. The disturbing and emotionally charged imagery of CHILD served as a lightning rod upon its initial exhibition at the De Young Museum in 1959-1960. CHILD was acquired by MoMA in 1970, and while the sculpture was lent to three venues since its acquisition it has never been on view at MoMA nor included in a Conner retrospective until 2016. This paper will overview three main aspects of the project: the history of CHILD and its condition at MoMA, the treatment process, and the documentation and analysis implemented to record the treatment and monitor its current and future condition. In 2015 MoMA hosted a group of scholars and conservators to review CHILD's history and come to a consensus on if and to what extent a conservation effort was possible or appropriate. Since its creation in 1960 the wax figure had taken on an increasingly slumped position due to a gradual delamination along the original tacked joins. The nylons had pulled away from the sculpture during an earlier restoration attempt in 2000 and hung tenuously from the chair in small bundles. CHILD's condition in 2015 was ultimately deemed unexhibitable and a treatment attempt was decided upon. The goal of the treatment of CHILD was to return the figure and the nylon stockings as close as possible to their 1960 orientation and, once in place, stabilize the sculpture so that it could withstand exhibition and travel in the present and future. We will review our treatment processes: removing sections of CHILD from its original chair, the production of a mock chair, stabilization and armature building of the wax components, and replacement of small sections of missing nylons. The overall treatment design was formulated in real time in response to the condition of the wax and trial and error of various armature designs. Rebuilding the wax figure was iterative and required the use of an armature material that could be reworked. We used a thermoplastic polyester resin, polycaprolactone, embedded in a variety of mesh and scrim materials to construct the armature. And finally this paper will review the documentation procedures we implemented to visualize the treatment including a GoPro timelapse, x-radiography, and photogrammetry. Material analyses of the treatment materials and wax were also performed by the MoMA science conservation department. These sets of information will also be used to monitor CHILD's condition and stability as it moves to other venues in the exhibition.

Speaker(s)
avatar for Megan Randall

Megan Randall

Conservation Fellow, Museum of Modern Art
Megan Randall is an Assistant Projects Conservator at the Museum of Modern Art. She completed her conservation training at the Conservation Center at the Institute of Fine Arts. Megan spent her internship year at the Museum of Modern Art (2014-2015). She has also completed internships... Read More →

Co-Author(s)
avatar for Roger Griffith

Roger Griffith

Associate Conservator, Museum of Modern Art
Roger Griffith is an Associate Sculpture Conservator at The Museum of Modern Art since 1998. He received his MA from the Royal College of Art/ Victoria & Albert Museum London England in 1997. Prior to MoMA he was an inter/fellow at the Sherman Fairchild Center for Objects Conservation... Read More →

Wednesday May 31, 2017 2:05pm - 2:30pm
Crystal Ballroom B Lobby Level, West Tower

2:30pm

(Beyond Treatment) Active conservation treatments and virtual retouching: what do people actually see?
The aging and discoloration of objects eventually lead to changes in their appearance and a loss in materiality and value. Active conservation treatments are meant to bring them back to some acceptable condition. However, at some point, an object is considered a “total loss” because it can no longer be treated according to accepted conservation ethics. Virtual retouching techniques have been shown to be a promising method for the non-invasive treatment of objects, allowing total-loss objects to be exhibited again, or at least to help conservators visualize treatments before making treatment decisions. With the use of corrective color lighting, at least some semblance of the original color or color balance in an object can be brought back without physically altering the object surface. Still, even with non-invasive virtual retouching, critical questions are being raised about what the acceptability of a virtually retouched appearance is. For example, various articles about the virtual treatment of five Rothko paintings at Harvard University show the diversity of opinions, ranging from the initial enthusiastic “Wow!” effect, to discussions about site-specific works, or the disturbing reflection of corrective light from a painting which produces its own light (New Yorker 2015). The Cultural Heritage Agency of the Netherlands (RCE) is examining these issues of acceptability and perception within the framework of research on the local virtual retouching of objects, that is, where only part of the object has changed. Case studies, perception tests, and eye tracking experiments are being used to determine what people actually see in a work of art before and after treatment. In an initial set of tests, subjects with widely different backgrounds were asked to look at two works in an exhibition setting, a virtually treated portrait by Van Gogh, “The Old Arlésienne”, and an untreated mixed-media work by the contemporary Dutch artist, Ger van Elk, “Adieu”, considered to be total loss. Further, subjects were asked to look at several solutions for the active or virtual retouching of a monochrome painting by the Dutch artist, Jan Roeland. For the Van Gogh and Roeland works, they were asked to evaluate the treatments. For the Van Elk work, they were simply asked to describe what they saw. In all three cases, no introductory information was provided. The results show that while descriptions and opinions differ widely as expected, explanations for the differences cannot be simply categorized into technical exhibition conditions or personal background. In fact, in the case of the Van Gogh painting, a small but significant number of subjects including both professionals and non-professionals did not even see the changes due to the virtual treatment which they were meant to see. Such results clearly have implications for the role of virtual retouching methods in conservation, but also for traditional forms of active conservation. Further work is being carried out to determine whether virtual retouching is an acceptable method for exhibiting locally aged works of art, or more an important tool to help conservators visualize and make treatment decisions.

Speaker(s)
avatar for William Wei

William Wei

Senior Conservation Scientist, Rijksdienst voor het Cultureel Erfgoed
Dr. Wei (1955) is a senior conservation scientist in the Research Department of the Cultural Heritage Agency of the Netherlands (RCE - Rijksdienst voor het Cultureel Erfgoed). He has a B.S.E. in mechanical engineering from Princeton University (1977) and a Ph.D. in materials science... Read More →


Wednesday May 31, 2017 2:30pm - 2:55pm
Regency A-B Ballroom Level, West Tower

2:30pm

(Treatment: Don't Go it Alone) A Pole with a Story: Innovative Conservation and Documentation of an American Indian Story Pole
This paper will describe a structural, yet reversible, treatment of a 5.75 foot tall painted wood story pole carved c. 1930 by Chief William Shelton of the Tulalip tribe. The treatment and innovative documentation were carried out at the Hibulb Cultural Center in the summer of 2014. Totem or story poles that have spent decades outdoors are invariably structurally compromised due to rot, insects, and other biological growth. In order to restore structural stability, past treatments of wooden totem/story poles have involved serious interventions that were neither reversible nor re-treatable, including impregnating the rotted wood with epoxy resins. While this treatment has been beneficial and allowed many deteriorated poles to be preserved and displayed (indoors and outdoors), treatment goals were sought that would impart stability to the object in a highly reversible and re-treatable manner, particularly because this story pole would remain indoors. Consolidation of the rotten and insect-eaten wood was conducted with Butvar®B-98 (polyvinyl butyral resin) and a removable, flexible epoxy resin fill system (Conserve Epoxy W200, a conservation grade epoxy resin) was devised to fill deep, irregularly shaped voids within the pole section. During the treatment, an exciting discovery was made in the identification of this pole section as belonging to the "Comeford Park Pole”, long thought to have been lost. In addition, by researching historic photographs of the Comeford Park Pole in the HCC archives and consulting with Tulalip tribal members, the top section of the pole was revealed to be another unidentified pole section located in storage and confirmed through photodocumentation techniques. These discoveries generated excitement within the community, and in consultation with native Tulalip carver and artist James Madison, plans were developed to reunite the pole sections with a strong back to be carved by Madison. Sharing the conservation treatment with the Tulalip community was important to the conservators in order to generate interest in and display transparency about the conservation treatment. To this end, the treatment was documented using a time-lapse camera and edited videos were shared on the Hibulb Cultural Center Facebook page.

Speaker(s)
avatar for Lesley A. Day

Lesley A. Day

Samuel H. Kress Foundation Conservation Fellow, Shelburne Museum
Lesley Day is a recent graduate of the UCLA/Getty Program for the Conservation of Archaeological and Ethnographic materials. Lesley began her conservation training as a pre-program intern in the Sherman Fairchild Center for Objects Conservation at the Metropolitan Museum of Art from... Read More →

Co-Author(s)
avatar for J. Claire Dean

J. Claire Dean

Conservator, Dean & Associates Conservation Services
J. Claire Dean is a professional conservator in private practice, based out of Portland, Oregon, USA. She has a B.A Hons. in archaeology from the University of Leicester, England, and a postgraduate degree in conservation from the University of Durham, England. She is an accredited... Read More →
avatar for Ellen Pearlstein-[Fellow]

Ellen Pearlstein-[Fellow]

Professor, UCLA/Getty Program in the Conservation of Archaeological and Ethnographic Materials
Ellen Pearlstein is a professor and member of the founding faculty in the UCLA/Getty Program in the Conservation of Archaeological and Ethnographic Material, where she teaches graduate classes in the conservation of organic materials, ethics of working with indigenous communities... Read More →

Wednesday May 31, 2017 2:30pm - 2:55pm
Regency C-D Ballroom Level, West Tower

2:30pm

(Treatment: Going Big) When what went up must come down: Triage treatment and disassembly of two 15th century Chinese mud plaster murals
In the spring of 2016 two monumental, mud plaster murals (~20ft. x 30ft.) at the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Anthropology and Archaeology underwent stabilization treatment and deinstallation. During the early twentieth century, each mural had been cut away from the walls of a Buddhist temple in Central China and removed to art dealer C.T. Loo's Paris atelier for mounting and restoration. The panels were subsequently purchased by the Penn Museum and installed in the Rotunda gallery in the late 1920's. After approximately 90 years on view, the murals displayed a range of condition issues including friable and powdering substrate, bulging and delaminating surface, as well as a heavy layer of dirt and grime over a thick, white shellac coating. Prompted by the impending demolition and construction at a site immediately adjacent to the museum, conservators were allotted 6 months to plan and complete this daunting project. The goal of this paper is two-fold: First, to present the dynamic inter- and intra- disciplinary collaboration by Penn Museum conservators to design the treatment methodology, including collaboration across specialties (objects, painted surfaces, and architecture) as well as with allied museum professionals (registrars, collections managers, and riggers); and second, to present as a case study the demanding, in-situ, triage treatment and dismantling of two monumental, unique museum artifacts. Specifically, we will describe the treatment process of gel cleaning, consolidation, and facing used to stabilize the surface, as well as the rigging and packing methodology employed to prepare the panels for movement to offsite storage.

Speaker(s)
avatar for Madeleine Neiman

Madeleine Neiman

Project Conservator, Penn Museum
Madeleine Neiman is a graduate of the UCLA/Getty Program on the Conservation of Archaeological and Ethnographic Materials and is currently a project conservator at the Penn Museum. Her previous conservation work includes a fellowship Kelsey Museum of Archaeology as well as internships... Read More →

Co-Author(s)
avatar for Emily Brown-[PA]

Emily Brown-[PA]

Mellon Fellow in Decorative Arts and Sculpture, Philadelphia Museum of Art
Emily Brown is a graduate of the Winterthur-University of Delaware Program in Art Conservation and is currently a Mellon Fellow in Objects Conservation at the Philadelphia Museum of Art. Including her previous work at the Penn Museum, Emily has completed graduate internships at the... Read More →
avatar for Lynn Grant-[PA]

Lynn Grant-[PA]

Head Conservator, Penn Museum
Lynn Grant joined The University of Pennsylvania Museum's Conservation Laboratory in 1988 as conservator for loans and Traveling Exhibits and has been Head Conservator at the Penn Museum since 2008. She received her degree in Archaeological Conservation from the Institute of Archaeology... Read More →

Wednesday May 31, 2017 2:30pm - 2:55pm
Crystal Ballroom A Lobby Level, West Tower

2:30pm

(Unique Objects/Unique Treatment) How important is knowing the ropes? Thoughts on the ethics and practice of conserving ship model rigging
The Rijksmuseum Amsterdam holds a significant collection of ship models transferred from the Dutch Navy in the 1880s. One particularly miniature model, the Thetis, is a 1:150 scale (estimated) fully-rigged model of a 24 gun, three deck ship. The model is polychrome and has decorative elements such as a crowned lion figurehead and stern carvings both carved from wood, and painted lead fishtail drops on the lower portions of the quarter galleries. Additional fittings include two anchors, two launches hanging above the waist, a ship’s bell, and a capstan on the main deck under bone grating. Though it is thought that the model represents a frigate named Thetis built in Amsterdam in the 18th century, it is unclear exactly which vessel the model represents, nor is it understood who made the model or for what purpose it was built, meaning that it is considered a non-technical model. Although the Thetis has been subject to at least three previous restoration campaigns, the thread rigging and textile sails of the ship model were found to be in an overall poor state and unstable condition. While rigging is often considered an important aesthetic component representative of a vital functional element on ship models, it may not always be accurate to the ship or the period that is represented for a variety of reasons. These materials are often the first part of the ship model that experience damage. On the Thetis, most of the silk sails were damaged, with tears and losses throughout. Additionally, much of the cotton thread that represents the running rigging was desiccated and broken. There is little to no formal literature regarding materials commonly utilized in ship model rigging, the conservation issues associated with ship model rigging, or the potential conservation treatments for this aesthetically complex portion of ship models. Traditionally, ship model makers, historians, and hobbyists have restored ship models, often completely removing and re-rigging the model as part of the restoration process. As part of this, damaged, desiccated, or what is considered incorrect rigging is often removed and replaced. The Thetis is no exception: it is likely that the rigging and sails were replaced sometime after it was accessioned into the Rijksmuseum in 1883. However, an additional crucial issue that required further consideration prior to conservation process is that the model has been incorrectly rigged in many areas. The historic practice of re-rigging still remains common in the field of ship model restoration on an international scale within both private and institutional collections. However, the ethics of performing full and even partial re-rigging on these unique objects must be carefully considered, especially in regards to miniature scale and non-technical ship models. This paper will use the most recent conservation treatment of the rigged portion of the Thetis as the lens to explore the ethical considerations in the conservation of ship model rigging, with the goal of providing a suggested practical methodology.

Speaker(s)
avatar for Davina Kuh Jakobi

Davina Kuh Jakobi

International Fellow (consulting conservator), Deutsches Schiffahrtsmuseum
From 2015-2017, Davina Kuh Jakobi served as the Junior Conservator for Ship and Scale Models at the Rijksmuseum, working primarily with the ship models in the Marinemodellenkamer (Navy model room) collection. Prior to this, Davina Kuh Jakobi has undertaken numerous conservation internships... Read More →


Wednesday May 31, 2017 2:30pm - 2:55pm
Crystal Ballroom B Lobby Level, West Tower

2:55pm

(Beyond Treatment) In Support of the Bigger Picture: Preventive Conservation as a Recognized Specialty
In recent decades, preventive conservation has become an increasingly larger and better defined part of every conservator's job. Innovations in environmental monitoring, pest management, archival materials, and overall collections care have enabled conservators to prevent damage or loss of cultural heritage more holistically, more sustainably, more economically, and on a larger scale than ever before. This growing body of knowledge has caused the field to rethink preservation, as preventive conservation action in the present can reduce the amount of interventive treatment needed in the future. This growth has been reflected internationally in both conservation-related education and membership groups. Many training programs in Europe and the U.K. now offer student specialization in preventive conservation, and at least one training program in the U.S. is planning to add it as a specialization soon. Preventive conservation sub-groups exist in the ICOM-CC, ICON, and now AIC with the recent founding of the Collections Care Network. Will we ever acknowledge and respect preventive conservation as its own independent specialty? Preventive conservation is developing as other specialties have historically; most recently, photography and electronic media grew from paper and became their own specific areas of concentration. Some practicing conservators have moved to become consultants focusing on museum environment, storage facilities, exhibition or conservation planning and surveying – yet may or may not already call themselves preventive conservators. Can one still be accepted as a conservation professional, even if they don't do hands-on treatment? At present, the AIC accepts many individuals who do not actively treat objects as conservation professionals, such as scientists, educators, and administrators. But other non-conservators share and engage in critical types of conservation activities, too. Can collection managers, registrars, art handlers, curators, and architects also be included as members of AIC so they can share in the many benefits that professional membership has to offer? Conservation has many parts that enable the whole to function, and all specializations are equally important. Treatment-based activities would not be effective without preventive-based activities, and vice-versa. It is important that conservators support one another in the common goal of preserving art and cultural heritage. This paper will discuss what should define a preventive conservator, the status of preventive conservation in AIC, and the wisdom of including preventive conservation specialization in conservation training programs.

Speaker(s)
avatar for Elena Torok

Elena Torok

Assistant Objects Conservator, Dallas Museum of Art
Elena Torok is the Assistant Objects Conservator at the Dallas Museum of Art (DMA), where she works on the treatment, research, and long-term care of the collection. She earned her M.S. from the Winterthur/University of Delaware Program in Art Conservation in 2013 with concentrations... Read More →

Co-Author(s)
avatar for Meg Loew Craft-[Fellow]

Meg Loew Craft-[Fellow]

Conservator, The Walters Art Museum

Wednesday May 31, 2017 2:55pm - 3:20pm
Regency A-B Ballroom Level, West Tower

2:55pm

(Treatment: Don't Go it Alone) Treatment of a White Louise Nevelson Installation
The Louise Nevelson Chapel of the Good Shepherd installation at the Saint Peter's Church in New York City consists of seven sculptural elements. An all covering thick, white chalky restoration paint, applied from 1986-2006, has disfigured the sculpture surface. This paper will discuss paint analysis, the interaction between the original paint and the restoration paint, the condition of each paint layer and the final treatment plan as well as the art historical background supporting the treatment, the sustainable approach to the treatment and the church community involvement. The ethics behind the treatment, justifying removal of the restoration layers will also be discussed. Through examination of the Saint Peter's Nevelson surface and cross sections, as well as eight additional white Nevelson sculptures, it was determined that the original paint surface was a homogeneous cream white coating. Deterioration of the restoration layers had created a problematic surface that was actively flaking, deteriorating and discolored. Additionally, the restoration paint is dirty, uneven with bumps, ridges, brush hairs, and is lifting, peeling, and pulling up original paint. Devising a treatment method to stabilize and clean the surface has been a multiphase process dependent on the art historical research, paint analysis, and church funding. Scientific analyses of the sculptures involving Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR), Gas Chromatography (GCMS), X-Ray fluorescence (XRF), and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) indicated that the original paint is an alkyd resin with titanium dioxide pigment. The restoration layer was identified as polyvinyl acetate paint (PVA) with titanium dioxide pigment as the colorant. Analysis of a brown streaking residue and white bloom indicate that pentaerythritol (PE) (degradation products of the alkyd) have leached into the PVA and deposited on the restoration surface, somewhat merging the two paints. The analysis was central to designing the treatment, allowing identification of a cleaning system that would solubilize the restoration paint layer without disturbing the original paint. Environmental management was key to stabilizing the sculptures. The environmental conditions of the chapel were studied to allow for a comprehensive plan that will be implemented through renovation of the HVAC system and a new lighting system. This paper will discuss treatment goals including the decision to use funori to consolidate the paint and PVA Nanorestore gels to separate the restoration paint and reveal the original. The success and method for applying the funori will be examined and the gel application approach described. Waste reduction, minimizing toxicity and minimizing the environmental impact of the treatment were a goal of the treatment plan. A life cycle analysis (LCA) of the cleaning options influenced the treatment choices and methods. The progression of the project through funding applications, and the conservator involvement in discussions with the church community lead to the resulting execution of the project in phases and was a major part of the project success. Educating the church community, and working with the church pastors and congregation was a key part of the treatment process and a learning experience for all.

Speaker(s)
avatar for Sarah Nunberg

Sarah Nunberg

Conservator, The Objects Conservation Studio, LLC
Sarah Nunberg, principal of The Objects Conservation Studio, LLC, has been working as a conservator since 1989.  She specializes in conservation of archaeological, ethnographic, decorative and contemporary art, treating objects made of wood, ceramic, stone, metal, glass, skin, leather... Read More →

Co-Author(s)
avatar for Carolyn Tomkiewicz, [PA]

Carolyn Tomkiewicz, [PA]

Paintings Conservator, Conservator of Paintings, Private Practice
Carolyn Tomkiewicz works in private practice in Brooklyn. She worked as Paintings Conservator at the Brooklyn Museum from 1986, caring for the collection, as well as supervising interns. She retired from the museum in 2012. She has co-taught workshops on “Adhesives for Conservation... Read More →
avatar for Soraya Alcala

Soraya Alcala

Paintings Conservator, American Museum of Natural History
Soraya Alcalá is a Museum Conservator. Currently, she is a consultant to The Hispanic Society of America, and she is collaborating with Conservator John Scott in the maintenance and conservation of the Outdoor Sculpture Collection of Princeton University. She organizes training workshops... Read More →
avatar for Jens Dittmer

Jens Dittmer

Professor of Physics, Institut des Molécules et des Matériaux du Mans Université du Maine
Dr. Dittmer is NMR spectroscopist focusing on material science.
avatar for Mathew Eckelman

Mathew Eckelman

Professor of Civil Engineering, Northeastern University
Matthew Eckelman is an Assistant Professor at Northeastern University in Civil and Environmental Engineering, with a secondary appointment in Chemical Engineering. His research covers life cycle assessment, environmental systems modeling, and green engineering, with a focus... Read More →
avatar for Michael Henry

Michael Henry

Principal Engineer/Architect, Watson & Henry Associates
Michael C. Henry, PE, AIA, is Principal Engineer/Architect with Watson & Henry Associates. He consults on sustainable environmental management and building envelope performance for preventive conservation of museum collections. He consults throughout the United States and in Cuba... Read More →
CK

Cindie Kehlet

Associate Professor, Pratt Institute
avatar for Chris McGlinchey

Chris McGlinchey

Conservation Scientist, Museum of Modern Art
Chris joined the Museum of Modern Art in 1999 to setup the science section of the conservation department. Prior to that he worked in the paintings conservation department at the Metropolitan Museum of Art where he assisted with technical analysis of the collection and the development... Read More →

Wednesday May 31, 2017 2:55pm - 3:20pm
Regency C-D Ballroom Level, West Tower

2:55pm

(Treatment: Going Big) Puvis de Chavannes’ Philosophy: Condition Issues and Strategies for the Removal of a Severely Detached Mural, its Conservation Treatment and Remounting
This paper describes condition issues and strategies for the treatment of Puvis de Chavannes' Philosophy mural, one of nine canvasses at the Boston Public Library. Painted by the artist in France on linen canvas, the 14' x 7' mural was shipped to America and marouflaged to the plaster wall with a lead white in linseed oil adhesive in 1896. For more than half a century, intermittent moisture infiltration had caused gradual partial separation of the canvas support from the plaster. In 2015, however, it was discovered that 80% of the canvas had completely detached. Furthermore, failure of a large section of plaster and metal lath support near the top of the mural was exerting outward pressure on the already loose canvas causing it to sag downwards, forming large undulations and a severe bulging crease. Left unchecked, collapse of the plaster would have ultimately led to catastrophic damage including tearing of the canvas and extensive paint loss. Any potential structural intervention to treat the mural was complicated by a number of factors. The mural is set within a marble faced niche making access to the edges of the canvas difficult. During the initial examination, attempts to detach the portions of the canvas still attached to the plaster using a micro-spatula revealed that both the paint and canvas are extremely brittle. The deteriorated condition of the plaster and other factors precluded the possibility of re-adhering the loose canvas to the wall. Although several structural treatment options were considered, it became evident that removal of the mural from its niche was necessary. It was recognized from the outset that the procedures required to perform such work would be complex, challenging and not without considerable risk. The brittleness of paint, ground, canvas and lead white adhesive excluded the possibility of detaching the mural at the interface between the canvas and the wall. Moreover, the strong bond between the undetached canvas and plaster along the left and bottom of the mural dictated that a partial stacco a masello process be employed, all the while, keeping the canvas intact and minimizing paint loss. The mural was first faced with Kozo tissue adhered with UVLS artist's varnish emulsified with a small amount of water followed with linen canvas adhered with the same adhesive fortified with BEVA Gel. The plaster was then severed from the bottom up while lightweight rigid support panels were progressively attached to the face of the mural and locked together to form a continuous solid support. Once it was completely detached, the mural was lowered face down and transported to a work space in the Library. There, removal of plaster from the reverse of the canvas was carried out followed by removal of facings, lining of the mural onto an aluminum honeycomb panel and reinstallation in its niche. The discussion will focus not only on the successes of the treatment but also underline the challenges and problems encountered during the project and aspects of the process that warrant improvement.

Speaker(s)
avatar for Gianfranco Pocobene

Gianfranco Pocobene

Conservator, Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum
Gianfranco Pocobene specializes in the treatment of easel paintings and murals and is presently the John L. and Susan K. Gardner Chief Conservator at the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, a position he has held since 2004. He received his Master of Arts in Conservation from Queen’s... Read More →

Co-Author(s)
avatar for Ian Hodkinson

Ian Hodkinson

Emeritus Professor, Queen's University
Ian Hodkinson received an M.A with honours in fine art and an art teaching diploma from Edinburgh University and the Edinburgh College of Art respectively in 1958. He then spent a year at the Istituto Centrale Per Il Restauro in Rome after which he joined the staff of the National... Read More →

Wednesday May 31, 2017 2:55pm - 3:20pm
Crystal Ballroom A Lobby Level, West Tower

2:55pm

(Unique Objects/Unique Treatment) Reattaching without adhesive? Yes we can! The reactivation of paint on animation cels.
Research is underway at the Getty Conservation Institute (GCI) and the Walt Disney Animation Research Library (ARL) to investigate storage and treatment strategies for animation cels. Animation cels are transparent sheets of cellulose nitrate, cellulose diacetate, -triacetate or polyester that are inked on the front - which is the viewing side - and painted on the reverse. A condition survey of animation cels, selected from productions between 1937 and 1989 from the ARL collection, revealed that only a small percentage of cels show evidence of paint cracking, delamination or flaking. This paper will present recent innovations in paint reattachment, based on research findings, which rely on intrinsic hygroscopic properties of the cel paints. As described in lab notebooks, paint recipes and other documents in the Disney Archives, paints made at the Disney Ink & Paint Department between 1936 and 1986 were formulated with gum-based binding media. Surfactants and humectants were added to the paints to improve application to the plastic sheets and impart flexibility to the dried paints. Verification of the archival information was carried out using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) on a selection of cel paints, which also provided useful estimates of pigment-to-binder ratios and precise information about additive compositions. Time-lapse video of an experiment, placing a cel in an environmental chamber and fluctuating between 15 and 75 percent relative humidity (%RH), revealed the responsive behavior of the sheet and paint. Surprisingly, previous delaminated paint reattached in some areas at elevated RH levels. To investigate the causes of these phenomena and assess the relative hardness of paints as a function of RH, selective paints were studied using manually applied indentation on a micro-scale ranging from 30-85%RH. Interestingly, some colors became almost fluid above certain %RH levels, but regained their firmness as the RH was reduced. Analysis of these paints by a nano-indenter instrument is planned for comparing to the results of manual indentation. Time-lapse studies of cels undergoing temperature cycling will also be conducted for comparison. Based on these findings, the conservation approach aims to investigate the reactivation of hygroscopic additives in the paint media, thus minimizing the creation of a moisture barrier. A number of application techniques are explored that utilize humidity, solvents and combinations of both, with limits imposed by the solubility parameters of the paints and plastic sheets. Use of a specially constructed workstation based upon approaches for reverse-glass paintings conservation, where the object is elevated onto a glass plate and a mirror is placed underneath, permits simultaneously viewing and imaging the front and reverse of cels during tests and treatments. The use of humidity and solvents to treat flaking paint by reactivation is a balancing act that poses interesting practical and ethical issues. Can treatments cause permanent distortions in the plastic sheets? When can migration of additives in the paints and sheets occur? To what extent can paint be re-solubilized without changing its original characteristics? Responses to these issues will be discussed.

Speaker(s)
avatar for Katharina Hoeyng

Katharina Hoeyng

Katharina Höyng
Katharina Hoeyng recently moved to Amsterdam where she works as a freelance conservator. Prior to that Kathariana joined the Getty Conservation Institute from 2015-2018. As part of the Preservation of Plastics project, she researches and evaluates treatment methods for reattaching... Read More →

Co-Author(s)
avatar for Vincent L. Beltran

Vincent L. Beltran

Assistant Scientist, Getty Conservation Institute
Vincent Beltran joined GCI Science in 2002. He has been an active participant in a range of research projects including the mechanical characterization of historic materials, the effect of reduced oxygen environments on color change, evaluations of packing case performance during... Read More →
avatar for Carolyn Carta

Carolyn Carta

Research Lab Assistant, Getty Conservation Institute
Carolyn Carta joined the GCI in 2016 as a research lab assistant to lead scientific studies as part of the GCI's collaborative research project with the Disney Animation Research Library. She graduated in 2011 with a BA in art history, studio art, and chemistry from Trinity College... Read More →
avatar for Art Kaplan

Art Kaplan

Research Lab Associate, Getty Conservation Institute
Art Kaplan has spent a decade working on the application of analytical instrumentation to the identification and study of photographic processes and materials. His research focuses on the use of noninvasive and nondestructive techniques in the identification of photographic processes... Read More →
avatar for Joy Mazurek

Joy Mazurek

Assistant Scientist, Getty Conservation Institute
Joy Mazurek specializes in the identification and characterization of natural and synthetic organic materials by a number of analytical techniques including gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and ion chromatography. She also works on the classification of biomarkers produced by... Read More →
avatar for Kristen McCormick

Kristen McCormick

Art Exhibitions and Conservation Manager, Walt Disney Animation Research Library
Kristen McCormick has been at the Walt Disney Company for over a decade and a half where she has been responsible for the safe keeping, care and transport of a broad range of artworks from African Art to Animation. In her current role she oversees the conservation care of the Walt... Read More →
avatar for Michael R. Schilling

Michael R. Schilling

Senior Scientist, Yale Institute for the Preservation of Cultural Heritage
Michael Schilling is head of Materials Characterization research at the Getty Conservation Institute, which focuses on development of analytical methods for studying classes of materials used by artists and conservators. He specializes in gas chromatography, mass spectrometry and... Read More →

Wednesday May 31, 2017 2:55pm - 3:20pm
Crystal Ballroom B Lobby Level, West Tower

3:30pm

Break in the Exhibit Hall
Wednesday May 31, 2017 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Riverside West Exhibit Hall Exhibit Level, East Tower

3:30pm

001. (Architecture) Identification and Analysis of Hard Water Staining on Granite in the Western United States and Comparative Study for Cleaning Methods
Hard water staining on granite is a matter that affects many outdoor and indoor monuments. This is exceptionally worrisome for memorialists, monument builders, cemetery staff, and families. The severe delimitation of granite headstones in the Western United States, particularly in Colorado, Utah, New Mexico, and Nevada is a topic of concern. The stones in these geographic regions are weathered, stained, cracked, and covered in mineral deposits and scaling; some granite headstones exhibit delimitation after only four years. The scaling and delamination from hard water exposure has weakened the granite structurally and is cosmetically; the stones have become visually detracting and unstable, potentially posing a safety hazard for visitors. This paper aims to provide the reader with the knowledge required to make an informed decision when faced with an issue of hard water staining on granite. This study investigates both chemical and mechanical treatment of the stones as well as preventative maintenance practices to consider. All of the treatments tested are commercially available and have been evaluated based solely on their performance results. Projects Aims: The main objection of this project is to inform people of the issue: hard water staining on granite, particularly in the Western region of the United States. We aim to discern what is causing the staining and delamination of the granite through scientific testing and replication of the scaling on monitored samples and controls. And, we aim to test treatment and cleaning options, both mechanical and chemical. Once the data has been analyzed we want to inform the public about the most effective procedure for removal.

Speaker(s)
avatar for Alex Beard

Alex Beard

Materials Conservation Research Assistant, National Center for Preservation Technology and Training
I graduated from Xavier University in May of 2014 with a Bachelor of Fine Arts Degree with a Fiber Arts Concentration and a minor in Art History. I have also completed a major-level chemistry track and Italian track. My career plan upon completing my Masters of Arts and Certificate... Read More →

Co-Author(s)
avatar for Jason Church-[PA]

Jason Church-[PA]

Materials Conservator, National Center for Preservation Technology and Training (NCPTT)
Jason Church is a Materials Conservator in the Materials Conservation Program at the National Center for Preservation Technology and Training (NCPTT) in Natchitoches, LA. NCPTT is a research and training office of the National Park Service. Jason divides his time between original... Read More →
avatar for Caitlin R. O'Grady

Caitlin R. O'Grady

Lecturer in Conservation, Institute of Archaeology, University College London
Dr. Caitlin R. O’Grady is a Lecturer in Conservation at University College London where she teaches in the MA and MSc conservation programmes at the Institute of Archaeology. With an undergraduate degree from Case Western Reserve University, she trained as a conservator and conservation... Read More →

Wednesday May 31, 2017 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Riverside West Exhibit Hall Exhibit Level, East Tower

3:30pm

002. (Architecture) Rescuing schools: Conservation program of historical educational buildings in the city of Rosario, Argentina
The aim of this paper is to highlight an ongoing conservation program developed at the Universidad Nacional de Rosario concerning the establishment of an innovative management model regarding the conservation of educational heritage in the city of Rosario. Background In the Province of Santa Fe, the Ministry of Education is responsible for school buildings. While new schools have been built, there is no formal conservation program regarding historical educational buildings. Unfortunately, the budget towards their maintenance is insufficient. The resources are used when the only alternative is repairing these centenary buildings when they are on the verge of collapsing. Program Rescuing Schools program has proposed an innovative, participative and decentralized management where the educational community is linked to the inhabitants of the neighborhoods where the schools are located, to the University, to the Ministry of Education and to the companies that are interested in contributing to the protection of educational heritage. This model is based on a management protocol, which is at the same time the regulatory framework of all actions. The program under my direction is developed by three academic units: Architecture, Law, and Humanities and Art. The working teams include students, professors and staff of the selected schools for the beta trial. The aim of our program is to optimize the maintenance and preservation of the buildings, and ultimately to promote the development of a Conservation Program of Historical Educational Buildings. The first actions were focused on the survey and registry of the buildings, and the assessment of the socio-educational contexts of each school. In a second stage began the development of a digital data base –available on line- that will allow the enquiry of the information gathered and the proposed actions. Currently, we are compiling an inventory and catalogue of goods that includes their conservation status that will allow us to establish priorities for future interventions. To properly preserve the educational heritage, it is necessary to document, study and define intervention projects that include instances of survey, analysis and diagnosis of pathologies, in conformity with international conservation standards, and make a commitment to monitoring and fulfilling preventive maintenance actions. This stage will be formulated in agreement with the Provincial administration and implemented by the interdisciplinary teams of the University. Preliminary conclusions • The community feels committed to preserving the education heritage. • By optimizing the processing times of the proposals and making rational use of the available resources, we get closer to a sustainable conservation program for the local educational heritage. • Through the articulation of public-private financing, the adaptation and rehabilitation of educational establishments can be addressed. The Ministry of Education has found the program as a suitable model to be applicable in different areas of the province. Cooperation agreements have been signed with the University to: • Conduct periodic monitoring of the state of conservation of buildings. • Document the conservation projects. • Establish a commitment regarding the maintenance of the buildings -a preventive conservation program- which reduces the need for interventional conservation treatments.

Speaker(s)
CR

Carolina Rainero

Professor, Universidad Nacional de Rosario, Facultad de Arquitectura, Planeamiento y Diseño
Current Position 1986 – still. Professor. Facultad de Arquitectura.Universidad Nacional de Rosario. Principal Professor. Theory and Practice of the architectural project Department. 1986 – still. Arch. Del Rio & Rainero Bureau. Conservation and restoration of private listed historic... Read More →


Wednesday May 31, 2017 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Riverside West Exhibit Hall Exhibit Level, East Tower

3:30pm

003. (Book and Paper) Cellulose nanocrystals and nanofibrils for coating of paper artefacts
Paper artifacts constantly demand conservation and restoration treatments. Nanocellulose (namely cellulose nanocrystals, CNC, and cellulose nanofibrils, CNF) has been studied for filling paper losses on cultural objects (Camargos 2013; Camargos 2016). CNC have great crystallinity, which enhance their chemical stability, and CNF have improved mechanical behavior (superior tensile strength and stress-strain performance). Previous research is patented under Brazilian National Institute of Industrial Property (Camargos et al. 2014). Therefore, recent developments aim at improving processes of coating paper for both protect and consolidate paper objects. Cellulose nanocrystals consist essentially of crystalline domains of cellulose in nanometric scale obtained by the acid hydrolysis of cellulose fibers. Cellulose nanofibrils, on the other hand, are micrometer-long entangled fibrils that contain both amorphous and crystalline cellulose domains (Habibi et al. 2010; Abitbol et al. 2016). pH measurements indicated that both CNC and CNF polymers have stable pH around neutral values. Crystallinity index was estimated by X-ray diffraction and FTIR. Results showed superior crystallinity for CNC (86,0 - 100,0%) than for CNF (66,2 - 64,4%) and Eucalyptus fibers (76,7 - 67,0%), which revealed a higher chemical stability for CNC polymer. Mechanical testing was provided by stress-strain measurements. CNC polymer is too brittle and Eucalyptus fiber sheet (without any additives) is too weak, so these materials were not tested by stress-strain test. CNF, otherwise, presented great tensile strength (255,3 MPa) and maximum strain (25,4%). These results indicate that a material made with CNC and CNF can be suitable for both stability protection and mechanical consolidation when used as paper coating nanomaterial. Preliminary assessment of CNC and CNF coating was carried out combining both nanostructures in three different materials composition: 25% CNC 75% CNF, 50% CNC 50% CNF, 75% CNC 25% CNF. The polymers were applied upon 20th century paper sheets (wood pulp). Best results were observed for 50% CNC 50% CNF, which presented high transparence, homogeneous dispersion upon paper surface and noticeable increment on mechanical strength. Abitbol, T. et al., 2016. Nanocellulose, a tiny fiber with huge applications. Current Opinion in Biotechnology, 39, pp.76–88. Camargos, C., 2016. Compósitos de Nanocristais e Nanofibrilas de Celulose: Preparação, Caracterização e Potenciais Aplicações em Processos de Restauração de Documentos e Obras de Arte sobre Papel. UFMG. Camargos, C., 2013. Obtenção e avaliação de polpa de papel de nanocelulose (whiskers) como material para reintegração de lacunas em documentos e obras de arte em papel. UFMG. Camargos, C. et al., 2014. Polpa de papel de nanocelulose, processo para obtenção e uso na restauração de obras de arte e documentos em papel (nanocellulose paper pulp, preparation process and use in the restoration of paper artworks and documents), BR1020140073639. Habibi, Y., Lucia, L. a. & Rojas, O.J., 2010. Cellulose nanocrystals: Chemistry, self-assembly, and applications. Chemical Reviews, 110, pp.3479–3500.

Speaker(s)
CC

Camilla Camargos

Substitute Professor, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais
Camilla Henriques Maia de Camargos has a Master of Science degree in Chemistry (Physical-Chemistry, UFMG, Brazil, 2016) and a Bachelor of Science degree in Conservation and Restoration of Movable Cultural Heritage (UFMG, Brazil, 2013). Among several interests, she has extensively... Read More →

Co-Author(s)
avatar for Dr. João Figueiredo Junior

Dr. João Figueiredo Junior

Professor, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais
João Cura D’Ars de Figueiredo Junior has Phd in Inorganic Chemistry (UFMG, Brazil, 2008). He works with chemistry applied to cultural heritage with emphasis on corrosion of bronze and silver and the use of corrosion inhibitors as dithiocarbamates and aminoacids. Other field of... Read More →
DF

Dr. Fabiano Pereira

Professor, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais
Fabiano Vargas Pereira obtained the PhD at Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, in 2004, on polymer liquid crystals. Between 2005-2009 he worked at State University of Bahia and 2009 moved to Federal University of Minas Gerais. His research interest include biomaterials... Read More →

Wednesday May 31, 2017 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Riverside West Exhibit Hall Exhibit Level, East Tower

3:30pm

004. (Book and Paper) Local cleaning of stained artworks on paper: the new possibilities of rigid gels
The recent introduction of rigid or semi-rigid gels (gellan gum, agarose, agar, xanthan gum etc.) to the field of paper conservation opened new possibilities for treatments, especially for local cleaning. Such gels can be used with aqueous cleaning systems optimized via pH and conductivity adjustment and through the addition of buffers, chelating agents or antioxidants. To the best of our knowledge, parameters including chemical additives as well as the long-term consequences of such treatments remain open questions. Those questions are particularly important regarding local cleaning of stained artworks, due to the tendency of rigid gels to create a new wet/dry interface (or tideline) during treatment. A first investigation was started in 2015, in collaboration with the CRC (Centre de Recherche sur la Conservation des Collections, Paris) during a master's thesis research. The study was devoted to the specific use of agarose gel with adjusted pH and conductivity for local treatment of tidelines on paper. Tidelines were created on samples of artificially aged Arches® paper. Different combinations of pH and conductivity were tested to evaluate which are best for cleaning. It appears that alkaline pH and high conductivity were efficient for the cleaning of tidelines on the samples. Nevertheless, comparison with other solutions used to prepare the gels showed that calcium hydroxide solution is best for the cleaning of tidelines. The long-term effect of local treatments was also investigated using hygrothermal ageing of the cleaned samples. Despite the use of cyclomethicone solvents and pre-humidification to limit the diffusion of water, UV fluorescence was observed. This resulted from the creation of a second wet/dry interface during treatment. Fluorophores being precursors of colored compounds, this result emphasizes that local cleaning should be approached with caution. A "sandwich” configuration was also tested, by applying on one side of the sample the agarose gel prepared with a calcium hydroxide solution to clean locally the tideline and on the other side gellan gum covering the whole sample surface. This configuration showed promising results in terms of cleaning, aging and avoiding the creation of a second wet/dry interface during treatment. This sandwich method is nevertheless only applicable to artworks that can be wetted on their entire surface. The research will be continued starting in the fall of 2016 at the Smithsonian American Art Museum, and will be dedicated to the use of rigid gels and the optimization of the aqueous systems for local treatment of stained artworks on paper with water-sensitive media. Colorimetry measurements will be used to determine the cleaning efficacy of different gels made with buffers, chelating agents and antioxidants. The long-term consequences of those chemical agents, coupled with local cleaning will be evaluated by using artificial aging. As previous research has shown that local treatment can lead to unwanted long-term effects, new solutions will be tried to avoid formation of tidelines such as using an interface made of paper or applying cyclododecane. The paper's surface will be examined using optical microscopy. The first results of this research will be presented here.

Speaker(s)
avatar for Sophie Barbisan

Sophie Barbisan

Fellow, Smithsonian American Art Museum
Hi there! My name is Sophie Barbisan and I recently graduated from the National Institute of Cultural Heritage (Institut National du Patrimoine, Paris, France), specializing in paper and parchment conservation. | | I am currently a Postgraduate Fellow in Conservation of Museum Collections... Read More →
avatar for Catherine Maynor

Catherine Maynor

Paper Conservator, Smithsonian American Art Museum
Catherine I. Maynor specialized in paper conservation at the Cooperstown Graduate Program, receiving her Master of Arts degree and Certificate of Advanced Study in 1983. She worked in the Department of Prints and Drawings at the Art Institute of Chicago until 1986. Ms. Maynor served... Read More →

Co-Author(s)
avatar for Anne-Laurence Dupont

Anne-Laurence Dupont

Paper Conservation Scientist, Centre de Recherche sur la Conservation (Research Center for Conservation), Muséum National d'Histoire Naturelle, Sorbonne Universités
Anne-Laurence Dupont is Researcher at CNRS and Heritage Scientist at the Research Center for Conservation (CRC, Muséum National d’Histoire Naturelle, Sorbonne Universités). She completed a MSc in Biochemistry at the University of Montpellier in 1988, graduated from the Conservation... Read More →

Wednesday May 31, 2017 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Riverside West Exhibit Hall Exhibit Level, East Tower

3:30pm

005. (Book and Paper) Analysis of synthetic dyes and the Treatment of 1910's - 1950's Historic Chinese Wedding Documents
New technology can unlock the secret of dyes used in historical artifact and facilitates the formulation of appropriate conservation strategies for preserving cultural heritage. The application of advanced analytical techniques, initially developed in the field of analytical Science, provides conservators a tool to identify composition and to review information of where, when and how the artifact be formed. The result provides insights to conservators to devise a comprehensive treatment proposal. In recent decade, numerous literatures had been reported in the identification of dyes used in historical paintings or textiles with various analytical techniques [5-7]. Yet, the analogous studies of dyes on Chinese documents are less explored [8]. With continuous interest to investigate the dye used in Pearl River Delta region in China [9], herein we describe an investigation of synthetic red dyes used in a set of Chinese wedding documents predates from 1910's to 1950's which are the collection of Hong Kong Museum of History. Marriage is of fundamental significance in the rituals of traditional Chinese culture, which are generally known as the "Three Covenants and Six Rites”[1]. "Three covenants” are the wedding documents exchanged between the two families to confirm the engagement of marriage, which are important records for the Chinese heritage and thus of great historical significance. Most of the documents have suffered from various degrees of paper damages such as tears, lose, distortion and running of the colour. Hence, an effective and safe conservation treatment is of stark importance. Red is an auspicious color which usually corresponds to good fortune and happiness, hence the traditional wedding documents are all made in red [2]. Natural red dyes such as Ocher (mineral dyestuffs), Alizarin (plant dyestuffs) and Carminic acid (animal dyestuffs) were originally used in ancient time [3]. They were the only source of red until synthetic dyes were introduced to China in the late 19th century. Since then, natural dye had been entirely replaced by synthetic dyes due to the wider color ranges, composition uniformity, low costs and stability towards fading [4]. However, most of them are water-sensitive required special attention. To shed light on their histories and associated chemistry of the dyes, samples from the wedding documents taken at ten-year intervals were subject to study by various analytical methods including UV-Vis spectroscopy, TLC and Ultra-performance liquid chromatography with both diode array UV-Vis detector and time-of-flight mass spectrometer (Reverse phase UPLC-DAD-ESI-Q-TOF-MS). In the preliminary investigation, four synthetic dyes (Rodamine B, Rodamine 575, 2-Napthol orange and Aniline yellow) have been identified, indicating that they were already commonly applied during that period of time. Given the identified dyes are all relatively water soluble, conservators should consider alternatives to traditional wet treatment method, such as a dry lining Chinese mounting method for this type of wedding documents. This paper will extensively discuss on the new findings and this special technique in the course of treatment.

Speaker(s)
avatar for Paul CW Chan

Paul CW Chan

Assistant Conservator in Paper Conservation, Conservation Office, Leisure & Cultural Services Department, HKSAR
Paul Chan received his BSc(Hon.) in Chemical Technology and PhD in Organic Chemistry from Hong Kong Polytechnic University. In 2016 he joined the Conservation Office, LCSD and is presently an assistant conservator in paper conservation. His research focuses on the treatment and chemical... Read More →

Co-Author(s)
EC

Edward Chun-Yiu Law

Conservation Office, Leisure & Cultural Services Department, HKSAR
avatar for Angela Wai-Sum Liu

Angela Wai-Sum Liu

Conservation Manager, FIIC, Conservation Office, Leisure and Cultural Services Department, HKSAR
Angela LIU graduated with a master degree in Preventive Conservation at the Northumbria University in the UK. She has received formal training on Paper Conservation at the Camberwell College of Art, followed with a fellowship at the Freer Gallery of Art, The Smithsonian Institute... Read More →

Wednesday May 31, 2017 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Riverside West Exhibit Hall Exhibit Level, East Tower